2021-04-07 - Patrick Sean Tomlinson subpoenas Cloudflare -

CaesarCzech

Person of Interest
kiwifarms.net
I think he's just trying to get information on me to fuck with me
He is pinging a hornet nest, i mean does he believe you can restrain us all if we decide to have fun ?

We've made too many compromises already, too many retreats. They invade our space, and we fall back. They assimilate entire internet worlds, and we fall back.

Not again. The line must be drawn here. This far, no further. We've made too many compromises already, too many retreats.

The line must be drawn here. This far, no further.
I wonder does anybody here have any drawing skills i think drawing his fatass in various enviroments including medieval just being fat and disgusting might be decent idea.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Glowie

Terry Davis' inner voice
kiwifarms.net
Holy shit you're going to transition as a pure slav ? What would be your pronouns, or as they are called out there : brands of alcohol ?
Hungary doesn't give a shit that or Poland.

Also if memory serves there is a company that provides tight as all hell privacy and DDoS proof servers in Switzerland, unless you host terrorist shit or CP you're golden. I forgot the company name though

Found it https://www.hostpoint.ch or
opinions @Null ?
 
Last edited:

moocow

Moo.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
This is strange, the owner of patrickstomlinson.net got the same subpoena from GoDaddy on the same day (albeit with only 3 days to respond). They both decided to wait exactly 38 days before informing their customer of the subpoena?
It's common practice by businesses and lawyers to wait until the very last possible moment to comply with court orders, subpoenas, filing deadlines and the like. Same goes for compliance with their own terms of service and contractual obligations. If they say they have 30 days to after [some event] to notify you, you'll get that notice on day 30.

If you're braving the legal system on your own, it's not a bad idea to emulate that practice so long as you can absolutely guarantee you can prove you did what you were supposed to do by the deadline (because you're playing with fire if you screw that up). The exception to this is that you might want to object to things you don't like as quickly as you reasonably can in some cases (like this one, where the customer got a whopping 3 days to respond to a subpoena -- that ridiculous deadline deserves a legal challenge just by itself).

It's done for an assortment of reasons. To be blunt, the biggest reason is that it lets them put off having to actually do the work, e.g. "why do it now when I can do it tomorrow?" It also allows time to fight the demand and allows for the possibility that something could happen that makes it unnecessary to comply (e.g. case is settled, motion to quash is granted, order is vacated, demanded information is obtained by other means, etc.).

It's also "tactically advantageous" during litigation to minimize the amount of time your opponent has to review and respond to whatever you furnish to them, file with the court, or do in response to (or compliance of) an order. It gives them less time to strategize and can result in more billable hours for them if their counsel has to "burn the midnight oil" to properly research and respond, and so it can drive up costs. It's a dick move, but everybody does it, and it's pretty much expected.

Also if memory serves there is a company that provides tight as all hell privacy and DDoS proof servers in Switzerland, unless you host terrorist shit or CP you're golden. I forgot the company name though

Found it https://www.hostpoint.ch or
Nah, they may talk a big game, but their privacy policy makes it pretty clear that they'll buckle the moment somebody rattles the sabers:

Hostpoint.ch said:
To the extent that courts or authorities request and we are legally required, we will pass on your personal data to them or other third parties.
They'll roll over if they get subpoenaed.
 

DumbDude42

kiwifarms.net
Hungary doesn't give a shit that or Poland.

Also if memory serves there is a company that provides tight as all hell privacy and DDoS proof servers in Switzerland, unless you host terrorist shit or CP you're golden. I forgot the company name though

Found it https://www.hostpoint.ch or
opinions @Null ?
both hungary and poland will criminally prosecute you for holocaust denial, antisemitism, and probably some other hate speech shit too
 

Glowie

Terry Davis' inner voice
kiwifarms.net
It's common practice by businesses and lawyers to wait until the very last possible moment to comply with court orders, subpoenas, filing deadlines and the like. Same goes for compliance with their own terms of service and contractual obligations. If they say they have 30 days to after [some event] to notify you, you'll get that notice on day 30.

If you're braving the legal system on your own, it's not a bad idea to emulate that practice so long as you can absolutely guarantee you can prove you did what you were supposed to do by the deadline (because you're playing with fire if you screw that up). The exception to this is that you might want to object to things you don't like as quickly as you reasonably can in some cases (like this one, where the customer got a whopping 3 days to respond to a subpoena -- that ridiculous deadline deserves a legal challenge just by itself).

It's done for an assortment of reasons. To be blunt, the biggest reason is that it lets them put off having to actually do the work, e.g. "why do it now when I can do it tomorrow?" It also allows time to fight the demand and allows for the possibility that something could happen that makes it unnecessary to comply (e.g. case is settled, motion to quash is granted, order is vacated, demanded information is obtained by other means, etc.).

It's also "tactically advantageous" during litigation to minimize the amount of time your opponent has to review and respond to whatever you furnish to them, file with the court, or do in response to (or compliance of) an order. It gives them less time to strategize and can result in more billable hours for them if their counsel has to "burn the midnight oil" to properly research and respond, and so it can drive up costs. It's a dick move, but everybody does it, and it's pretty much expected.



Nah, they may talk a big game, but their privacy policy makes it pretty clear that they'll buckle the moment somebody rattles the sabers:



They'll roll over if they get subpoenaed.
I could've sworn there was third private one which is Swiss Bank equivalent server host. Back to digging, optimism
 

moocow

Moo.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I could've sworn there was third private one which is Swiss Bank equivalent server host. Back to digging, optimism
I swear I'm not picking on you, but Swiss banks aren't as bulletproof, private and safe as they used to be either:

NPR said:
This week Swiss bank UBS agreed to provide the U.S. government with details of more than 4,000 accounts. The IRS is going after clients suspected of hiding funds in UBS banks in Switzerland.
They're still hoarding shit tons of Nazi-related assets (cash, gold, artwork, etc.) too but people are still chipping away at that iceberg and slowly but surely various Swiss banks are caving in to the pressure and cooperating with foreign law enforcement now too.
 

Melissa Sanchez

kiwifarms.net
Statelessness is even less preferred than keeping citizenship, so I have to sort out new citizenship. I will be renouncing as soon as possible.
Ah Jeez dude. If you eventually find yourself in a situation where you can't do this Kiwi Farms thing anymore and you gotta get a normal job, your US citizenship is a giant asset. For all its flaws, USA has the highest salaries for what you do. Also if you ever have any kids (even in other countries), they can at any point in their life decide to become citizens. I understand your frustrations 1000%, but don't renounce your US citizenship man it's not worth it.
 

NerdShamer

International Glownigger Commander
kiwifarms.net
Judges everywhere (not just America) are astonishingly stupid and clueless about practically everything, even including law outside their narrow field of practice (from back when they were attorneys), and sometimes they even suck at that. They seem especially allergic to knowledge of anything technological. Watching judges struggle to run a Zoom conference would be funnier if it wasn't such a depressing demonstration of their level of competence dealing with the piece of technology they're most familiar with in their courtrooms.
It's not just the judges, too.

 

NulWillBecomeTranny

IGGER
kiwifarms.net
Statelessness is even less preferred than keeping citizenship, so I have to sort out new citizenship. I will be renouncing as soon as possible.

If you renounce your citizenship you can say goodbye to your rights to protection by your state and federal government. If someone kills you, don't you want them to be presecuted?
 
Last edited:

AnOminous

とても可愛い
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
kiwifarms.net
Statelessness is even less preferred than keeping citizenship, so I have to sort out new citizenship. I will be renouncing as soon as possible.
You know you can acquire a second citizenship without renouncing. The U.S. doesn't formally recognize dual citizenship but you also can't lose it just by adopting a second one.
 

Null

Ooperator
kiwifarms.net
Ah Jeez dude. If you eventually find yourself in a situation where you can't do this Kiwi Farms thing anymore and you gotta get a normal job, your US citizenship is a giant asset. For all its flaws, USA has the highest salaries for what you do. Also if you ever have any kids (even in other countries), they can at any point in their life decide to become citizens. I understand your frustrations 1000%, but don't renounce your US citizenship man it's not worth it.
Matthew 16:26 fuck the US
 
Top