Anti-anti-vaxxers megathread -

mr.moon1488

kiwifarms.net
I don't believe in forcing vaccines unless absolutely necessary, but people should know that if they don't get vaccinated, and then get sick, that's just on them.
 

ColtWalker1847

kiwifarms.net
I wish the vaccine existed when I was a kid. Chicken pox sucks. Shingles doesn't sound pleasant either.

I'm glad kids don't have to deal with that shit anymore. Unless they are a dumbass who refuses the vaccine. In which case, lol. Dumbass.
 
  • Agree
Reactions: Trilby and cactus

cactus

Cactus Juice Connoisseur
kiwifarms.net
Are there people saying there shouldn't be too many vaccines? It's not like pumping the kids full of antibiotics and if you can reduce the illnesses your hell spawn can catch, take fucking advantage of that shit.
 
  • Agree
Reactions: ColtWalker1847

Cosmos

Soldier of Love and Bitching on the Internet
Supervisor
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Kentucky teen who sued over school ban for refusing chickenpox vaccination now has chickenpox

Jerome Kunkel's family has no regrets about his inaction which could have prevented the highly preventable childhood malady.
https://www.nbcnews.com/video/anti-vaccination-kentucky-teen-reacts-to-contracting-chickenpox-59290693855
A northern Kentucky teenager banned from school for refusing the chickenpox vaccination due to his religious beliefs has come down with the childhood malady, his attorney said Wednesday.

Jerome Kunkel, a student at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Assumption Academy, first started showing chickenpox symptoms last week and hopes to have recovered by next week, a lawyer for the 18-year-old told NBC News.


Kunkel and his family have no regrets about their decision to not be vaccinated.

"These are deeply held religious beliefs, they're sincerely held beliefs," family attorney Christopher Wiest said. "From their perspective, they always recognized they were running the risk of getting it, and they were OK with it."

Some ultraconservative Catholics oppose chickenpox vaccinations because it was developed in the 1960s from cell lines of two aborted fetuses.

A chickenpox outbreak at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Assumption Academy in March prompted state health officials to order unvaccinated students to stay away from school. Kunkel unsuccessfully challenged the state ban in court.

Now that Kunkel has had the chickenpox, and is thus immune to it, he hopes to be back in class soon for the first time since March 15.

Kunkel said he's looking forward to his recovery and his life's getting back to normal.

"Thing are somewhat normal except ... for homework I got to catch up with," he told WLWT, an NBC affiliate in Cincinnati.

Had state health officials not intervened, the family's lawyer, Wiest said, his client would have had the chickenpox earlier this year.

"The ban was stupid," Wiest said. "He could have contracted this in March and been back to school by now."

Once the banned student can show that all of his chickenpox lesions have scabbed over, he'll be allowed to return to school, according to Doug Hogan, spokesman for Kentucky's Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

State health officials also lashed out at Wiest, accusing him of "downplaying the dangers of the chickenpox."

"Encouraging the spread of an acute infection disease in a community demonstrates a callous disregard for the health and safety of friends, family, neighbors and unsuspecting members of the general public," according to a statement by Laura Brinson, a spokeswoman for the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

Earlier this year, opponents of mandatory vaccinations seemed to pick up support from Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, who admitted he's exposed all nine of his children to chickenpox.

“We found a neighbor that had it, and I went and made sure every one of them got it. They were miserable for a few days and they all turned out fine," Bevin told WKCT, a radio station in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in March.

Despite his unorthodox actions, Bevin urged parents to get their kids vaccinated.
A case of karmapox, it seems.
 

An Account

kiwifarms.net
I'm honestly just happy that his reasoning wasn't the usual "It'll gimme the 'tism!" Kinda sad that it's gotten to that point, but what can you do?
 
Why are people in this thread acting like there's any validity whatsoever to the autism - vaccine link? It was utterly falsified, there's no more reason to believe in that connection than the connection between masturbation and blindness. It's just a thing some dumbass said.
 

Gazed too deep

The more I see, the more I regret.
kiwifarms.net
Why are people in this thread acting like there's any validity whatsoever to the autism - vaccine link? It was utterly falsified, there's no more reason to believe in that connection than the connection between masturbation and blindness. It's just a thing some dumbass said.
Because they'd like to blame their obvious autism on something.
 
Geez, people are hard on those who have had chicken pox! The vaccine didn't exist when I was a kid, so I got chicken pox. My dad caught it from me, he was about 30 or so, and it was pretty bad.

I hope I never suffer from shingles, I know people who have and it sounds fucking awful. Basically the herpes that causes chicken pox flares up around your nerves, causing incredible pain, sort of like a cold sore but over a significant section of skin.

It's the same virus, and from what I understand, the chicken pox vaccine is supposed to also prevent shingles. Wish I got it as a kid...
 

Trilby

I got stupid cool hip-hop style!
kiwifarms.net
Geez, people are hard on those who have had chicken pox! The vaccine didn't exist when I was a kid, so I got chicken pox. My dad caught it from me, he was about 30 or so, and it was pretty bad.

I hope I never suffer from shingles, I know people who have and it sounds fucking awful. Basically the herpes that causes chicken pox flares up around your nerves, causing incredible pain, sort of like a cold sore but over a significant section of skin.

It's the same virus, and from what I understand, the chicken pox vaccine is supposed to also prevent shingles. Wish I got it as a kid...
I do too, reading of Shingles just bugs me a bit.

There is a shingles vaccine but I think it's only recommended if you're over 50?
A few pharmacies in my area constantly have Shingles warnings when you come in, though they tend to say over 60 is when you should get one.
 

ConspiracytoLaugh

Colonel, we've managed to avoid drowning!
kiwifarms.net
Honestly, all I’m wondering is why people think the government would try to give people autism with vaccines. Why would they spend millions upon millions of dollars just to give the people products that “don’t work” and “give you autism”? If they just wanted to make money they could just use placebos. I’m honestly curious, maybe the anti-vaxxer in this thread can answer me.
 

greengrilledcheese

kiwifarms.net
Despite Measles Warnings, Anti-Vaccine Rally Draws Hundreds of Ultra-Orthodox Jews
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/nyregion/measles-vaccine-orthodox-jews.html (http://archive.fo/31p3C)
A “vaccine symposium” in Rockland County was denounced by health authorities and some ultra-Orthodox rabbis, who said the speakers were spreading dangerous propaganda.


MONSEY, N.Y. — An ultra-Orthodox rabbi falsely described the measles outbreak among Jews as part of an elaborate plan concocted by Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York to deflect attention from “more serious” diseases brought by Central American migrants.

A pediatrician questioned whether Jews were being intentionally given “bad lots” of vaccines that ended up giving children a new strain of the virus. And Andrew Wakefield, the British doctor whose study linking measles vaccines with autism was widely discredited and condemned, appeared via Skype to offer an almost apocalyptic vision of a world in which vaccines were giving rise to deadlier immunization-resistant diseases.

“We Hasidim have been chosen as the target,” said the rabbi, Hillel Handler. “The campaign against us has been successful.”

Since the measles outbreak began last fall, the health authorities have embarked on a sweeping and exhaustive campaign, repeatedly urging people to get vaccinated and fighting the spread of misinformation. They have made special efforts in the ultra-Orthodox communities of Brooklyn and Rockland County, N.Y., where the disease has been spreading most quickly.

But the rally on Monday in Monsey, a Rockland County town about 30 miles northwest of New York City, vividly illustrated how the anti-vaccine fervor is not only enduring, but may be growing: Hundreds of ultra-Orthodox Jews packed a ballroom for a “vaccine symposium” with leaders of the anti-vaccination movement.

Organized by a Monsey-based Jewish group, the event also showed how the movement was gaining ground: Greg Mitchell, a Washington-based lobbyist who represents the Church of Scientology, attended the meeting and addressed the crowd, offering to be their“voice in the public-policy game.”

The gathering was denounced by local elected officials, health authorities and some ultra-Orthodox rabbis, who said the speakers were spreading propaganda that could cause the outbreak to deepen, risking the health of countless people.

The event was held in a large ballroom. As is customary at ultra-Orthodox gatherings, the men were separated by an improvised wall from the women. Speakers were introduced and applauded as if they were celebrities.

The remarks — and the rapt audience — illustrated how the anti-vaccination movement can exploit fear and anxiety within relatively insular communities, especially religious ones, to undercut scientifically sound warnings from health experts.

“They are doubling down and increasing their messaging — capitalizing on fear,” Dr. Jane Zucker, the assistant commissioner of immunization for the New York City health department, said in an interview. “Parents are afraid of who and what to believe.”

Rabbi Handler, a 77-year-old from Brooklyn who said he was a Holocaust survivor, set the tone for the night, claiming that Jews were being persecuted as disease carriers and were being attacked on the street in New York City for sneezing. (The Anti-Defamation League has strongly objected to the appropriation of Holocaust symbols by vaccine critics.)

Mr. de Blasio has issued a public health emergency for four ZIP codes in Brooklyn where ultra-Orthodox Jews live. That decision appeared to have earned him the ire of Rabbi Handler, who described Mr. de Blasio as a “sneaky fellow” and a closet German — “Wilhelm, his real name, was named after Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany.”

(In fact, none of this is true. Mr. de Blasio was born Warren Wilhelm Jr., and later decided to take his mother’s last name as his own after becoming alienated from his father.)

In a telephone interview on Tuesday, Rabbi Handler sought to soften his anti-vaccine remarks.

“I don’t mind if someone takes a vaccine. It’s not my business,” he said. “What am I, a fascist? Am I going to bring down the law?”

The pediatrician who spoke on Monday night, Dr. Lawrence Palevsky, is regularly cited in pamphlets circulated in New York City that urge women not to get their children vaccinated. His views have no basis in science, experts said.

At the rally, he talked at length about mutating viruses and falsely claimed that failed vaccines were producing a new strain of measles. Women scribbled into notepads as he spoke. Others filmed his comments, sending them to their contacts on WhatsApp. Essentially, he said, there were no studies available to show how the vaccine affects the human body.

“Is it possible that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine that is somehow being given in this lot to communities in Williamsburg and Lakewood and Monsey, maybe in Borough Park, is it possible that these lots are bad?” he asked, referring to areas in New York and New Jersey with large ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities.

“It’s fascinating because we’re told how contagious the disease is, but somehow it’s centered in the Jewish community.”

Dr. Palevsky could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

Mr. Wakefield, who was stripped of his medical license in his native Britain some two decades ago for fraudulent claims linking vaccines to autism, accused the health authorities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of misleading the public. But before doing that, he insisted on his own innocence.

“I wanted to reassure you that I have never been involved in scientific fraud,” he said via Skype from a darkened room, his face appearing eerily white as it was projected onto two large overhead screens. “What happened to me is what happens to doctors who threatened the bottom line of the pharmaceutical companies.”

Rockland County has the highest number of recorded cases after New York City. But there are other pockets of large outbreaks as well, and not all of them in are in religious communities.

The C.D.C. said on Monday that the number of measles reported across the country rose by 75 last week, bringing the total to 839 in 23 states, the highest number of cases the United States has seen since measles was declared eliminated in 2000.

New York City alone has seen 498 confirmed cases of the disease since September. In the rest of New York state, there have been 274 confirmed cases, according to official figures. About 80 percent of those cases were located in Rockland County.

New York authorities have used a number of tactics to force people to get immunized, including excluding unvaccinated children from going to schools with low vaccination rates or threatening thousand-dollar fines on parents for failing to vaccinate their children.

The strategies have been largely successful, health officials have insisted, even though there have been setbacks.

In Rockland County, for example, a state of emergency declaration in March that banned unvaccinated children from public spaces was challenged by parents and halted after a judge ruled that the outbreak did not legally merit an emergency declaration.

The county executive, Ed Day, issued a new declaration last month that sought to prevent people who were exposed to measles from being in public places.

Local officials, including Mr. Day and Rabbi Chaim Schabes, expressed outrage in a joint statement at the “outsiders” who organized Monday’s rally and “are targeting our community.”

“Tonight’s event and the misinformation being shared at it runs counter to every statement from the medical experts and elected officials of our county,” the statement read.

“This type of propaganda endangers the health and safety of children within our community and around the world, and must be denounced in the strongest language possible.”
 

Lissamine Green

kiwifarms.net
Measles is legit fucking awful. One of the things that can happen is permanent damage to vision, and when my older relatives had it back in the day they had to basically recuperate in darkened rooms to prevent them from losing their eyesight.

Shirk that vaccine at your peril. (Mumps and Rubella aren't much fun either from what I understand)
Mumps can make your testicles swell uncontrollably and as if that weren't bad enough by itself, it can result in lifelong sterility. Rubella causes horrible birth defects. Bad times.
 
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