Science Astronomers spot ‘cosmic web’ that sticks the universe together -

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Iwasamwillbe

The Black Man, The Crawling Chaos
kiwifarms.net

The cosmic web responsible for “gluing” the far-flung galaxies of the universe together has been directly observed for the first time ever.
Scientists using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope were able to spot an ancient cluster of galaxies 12 billion light-years away that are linked together by a network of gas filaments.

The cosmic web theory is central to current explanations of how the universe formed after the Big Bang.
However, until this observation, there had only been indirect evidence to suggest it existed.
Michele Fumagalli, an astrophysicist at Durham University and co-author of the work, said: “It is very exciting to clearly see for the first time multiple and extended filaments in the early universe.”
“We finally have a way to map these structures directly and to understand in detail their role in regulating the formation of supermassive black holes and galaxies.”


The research team was able to directly detect the web by using intensive equipment designed to pick up the faintest of structures.
Galaxy clusters are known for being the most tightly gravitationally bound structures in the universe.
They can contain hundreds of thousands of galaxies.
It has been predicted that 60% of the hydrogen created during the Big Bang can be seen as long filaments strung out across space in the cosmic web.
By mapping out some of the light emitted by hydrogen within a galaxy cluster called SSA22, the team were able to identify individual filaments of gas that make up a web-like structure between galaxies.
Erika Hamden, an astrophysicist at the University of Arizona said: “These observations of the faintest, largest structures in the universe are a key to understanding how our universe evolved through time, how galaxies grow and mature and how the changing environments around galaxies created what we see around us.”

It is thought that the cosmic web is the scaffolding of the cosmos and provides the framework for galaxies to form and evolve.
The latest observations support this theory by revealing supermassive black holes, starbursting galaxies and lots of active stars all at the intersections between the filaments.
First author of the research Hideki Umehata said: “This suggests very strongly that gas falling along the filaments under the force of gravity triggers the formation of starbursting galaxies and supermassive black holes, giving the universe the structure that we see today.”
The cosmic web has been observed before but only as short blobs of gas beyond galaxies.
Umehata noted: “Now we have been able to clearly show that these filaments are extremely long, going even beyond the edge of the field that we viewed.
“This adds credence to the idea that these filaments are actually powering the intense activity that we see within the galaxies inside the filaments.”
The findings have been published in the journal Science.
 

Positron

Subconsciously Suberogatory
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
The cosmic web theory is central to current explanations of how the universe formed after the Big Bang.
It is thought that the cosmic web is the scaffolding of the cosmos and provides the framework for galaxies to form and evolve.
Not so sure about that. As far as I'm aware the formation of cosmic structures is believed to be the result of quantum fluctuation within a "uniform" distribution of radiation after the Bang. The area that started off getting a tiny tiny bit denser got progressively denser still, thanks to gravity (which recalls how the rich get ever richer). As radiation cooled down and became matter, the dense masses became the progenitor of galaxy cluster.

"Cosmic filaments" that attracts gas through gravity recall the once-fashionable theory of Cosmic Strings -- mysterious, hyperdense entity that push matter together through the creation of gravitation waves.
 

Your Weird Fetish

Intersectional fetishist
kiwifarms.net
So, will we be able to determine exactly where the Big Bang happened with this information?

Either way, fucking cool!
No unfortunately. There was no where when the big bang happened because there was no space (or time, for that matter) until the big bang happened. Everything in the universe was part of a singularity. Beyond that, as far as I'm aware there is no arbitrary point within our light envelope we could call the center of the universe. So if there is such a place, and if that even means anything, we could only discover it with FTL. Really, REALLY fast FTL.
 

Vecr

"nanoposts with 90° spatial rotational symmetries"
kiwifarms.net
No unfortunately. There was no where when the big bang happened because there was no space (or time, for that matter) until the big bang happened. Everything in the universe was part of a singularity. Beyond that, as far as I'm aware there is no arbitrary point within our light envelope we could call the center of the universe. So if there is such a place, and if that even means anything, we could only discover it with FTL. Really, REALLY fast FTL.
Yeah, the entire universe is where the Big Bang happened.
 

DragoonSierra

kiwifarms.net
No unfortunately. There was no where when the big bang happened because there was no space (or time, for that matter) until the big bang happened. Everything in the universe was part of a singularity. Beyond that, as far as I'm aware there is no arbitrary point within our light envelope we could call the center of the universe. So if there is such a place, and if that even means anything, we could only discover it with FTL. Really, REALLY fast FTL.
Wormholes. You cant go FTL.
 
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