Science Astronomers spot ‘cosmic web’ that sticks the universe together -

How close are we to finally piercing the veil of nature and discovering the secrets of the universe?

  • Very close

    Votes: 6 4.1%
  • Close

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • Halfway there

    Votes: 8 5.4%
  • Far away

    Votes: 4 2.7%
  • Very far away

    Votes: 5 3.4%
  • We've barely even started yet, really

    Votes: 124 83.8%

  • Total voters
    148

Your Weird Fetish

Intersectional fetishist
kiwifarms.net
How does that get around the "no FTL is possible" rule? You still end up thousands of light years from where you started and it only took a moment to get there. You got there faster than light could get there by taking the "long way."

Not trying to be difficult, btw. I'm genuinely perplexed.
The issue is that from your frame of reference you absolutely did not break the speed of light but from the frame of reference of much of the rest of the universe you did. I don't know what that would do because there is no privileged frame of reference and they'd both be true. But I have a dumb meat brain that evolved for organism scale stuff and works on ideas like velocity is an absolute and objective quality of something and that causes must always precede their effect. A universe with wormholes doesn't care about that stuff.
 
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No Exit

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How does that get around the "no FTL is possible" rule? You still end up thousands of light years from where you started and it only took a moment to get there. You got there faster than light could get there by taking the "long way."

Not trying to be difficult, btw. I'm genuinely perplexed.
It's like creating a localized doorway or secret tunnel. The two points in space are connected and thereby local. So while everything around the wormhole is a crazy amount of lightyears away the two points of the wormhole are basically a doorway. Admittedly I've forgotten a lot of the deeper explanations behind it so I don't think I could go into much more detail without making some guesses.
 

moocow

Moo.
True & Honest Fan
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It's like creating a localized doorway or secret tunnel. The two points in space are connected and thereby local. So while everything around the wormhole is a crazy amount of lightyears away the two points of the wormhole are basically a doorway. Admittedly I've forgotten a lot of the deeper explanations behind it so I don't think I could go into much more detail without making some guesses.
I understand the "two points mashed together" part of the theory. What confuses me is how are those two points so close together yet so far apart? Why is moving through the doorway faster than moving past it on the outside, just a bit off the side?

For that matter, how do two distant points in space become connected in the first place? Do they just "bend" space towards each other for some reason instantly (traveling at FTL speeds to reach each other) or do they drift for millennia at sublight speeds to reach each other? What happens to objects that travel through/across the "warped" space the "long way around"? Do they just warp to conform with the shape of the warped space, or do they get torn apart, or does something else happen?

It just seems like these are contradictory or incompatible ideas -- the notion that nothing can ever travel faster than light but also using wormholes or warped space you can still cover light years in seconds by crossing a special threshold. The fact remains you've still moved further than you could possibly move if you couldn't exceed the speed of light.

Don't get me wrong, I'd love for it to work and I wouldn't second-guess it if you put me on a ship with a working warp drive and drove us to the Planet of the Blue Babes. I don't understand electricity either but I still accept that it works anyway because it hurts like hell plugging in a pair of keys into an outlet bare-handed.

Meh. This is why I'm not a physicist.
 

No Exit

Boss of succ-e posts
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I understand the "two points mashed together" part of the theory. What confuses me is how are those two points so close together yet so far apart? Why is moving through the doorway faster than moving past it on the outside, just a bit off the side?

For that matter, how do two distant points in space become connected in the first place? Do they just "bend" space towards each other for some reason instantly (traveling at FTL speeds to reach each other) or do they drift for millennia at sublight speeds to reach each other? What happens to objects that travel through/across the "warped" space the "long way around"? Do they just warp to conform with the shape of the warped space, or do they get torn apart, or does something else happen?

It just seems like these are contradictory or incompatible ideas -- the notion that nothing can ever travel faster than light but also using wormholes or warped space you can still cover light years in seconds by crossing a special threshold. The fact remains you've still moved further than you could possibly move if you couldn't exceed the speed of light.

Don't get me wrong, I'd love for it to work and I wouldn't second-guess it if you put me on a ship with a working warp drive and drove us to the Planet of the Blue Babes. I don't understand electricity either but I still accept that it works anyway because it hurts like hell plugging in a pair of keys into an outlet bare-handed.

Meh. This is why I'm not a physicist.
Oh. Imagine that the entire universe is on the skin of an inflated balloon like object and just push two opposite end together. The two ends meld together and create a gap.
Another way of imagining moving faster than light is thinking of the universe in higher dimensional planes. Like you would move way faster than light if you traveled on a 4th or 5th dimensional plane similar to how walking across a room (3D) is faster than having to hug the walls to get around (2D).
 

Yotsubaaa

Happy Halloween!
kiwifarms.net
I read the article a couple times ... reads more like science fiction that reality. So much speculation, not a lot of solid information.
So basically astrologists observed galaxies inside of huge Nebulea . OK, cool ? How is this helping with ( insert world problems here ) :?:
That's just the media article. If you're curious about their "solid information", the preprint for their research paper is up on arXiv. Here's what I could make of their paper without getting bogged too down in the specifics:
Whenever we look at large images of the universe, we see stuff like this (picture courtesy of Wikipedia):
filamentuniverse.gif

Each of those white dots is a galaxy. Looking at this picture, it almost looks like the galaxies align themselves along thin lines (filaments) in some sort of a cosmic web structure.

But that could just be a coincidence, right? (I mean, probably not; there's a bit too much structure there. But we are wise to start from a skeptical position.) It's possible that each of those dots are just discrete galaxies, completely separated from each other. Unless there's something connecting them, like maybe sparse streams of gas fall along these filaments? Our working physics models of how the universe structures itself support that idea, so let's see if we can detect gas along these filaments.

Well, damn. This kind of sucks for us, because these filaments are so sparse that it'd be really difficult for us to even detect that gas above the level of background radiation noise. However, our physics models also predict that the gas in the filaments emits the Ly-α spectral line. That's still nigh-undetectable for us, but in regions of concentrated submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the local radiation field is boosted and we can detect the Ly-α line.

So let's set up an experiment. We have such a region of concentrated SMGs and AGNs in the galaxy proto-cluster SSA 22. So let's point the European Southern Observatory's aptly-named Very Large Telescope at it and see what we can find!

Once you've run the observation experiment and analyzed the data, you get this (from their research paper):
cosmicweb.png

That picture on the left is a still image from their data collection (that massive white circle is an artifact error: their instruments weren't able to accurately measure radiation at those points.) There is one filament running up the lefthand side of the picture (i.e. a line of squares and circles that they use to depict their SMGs and AGNs), and another filament running up the righthand side.

The two pictures on the right are their resulting colormaps. We can see evidence that yeah, it looks like streams of gas fall along the filaments (keep in mind that away from the SMGs and AGNs we can still barely detect the stuff, but it looks to be the case). The middle picture colors by Ly-α surface brightness (again, that massive black circle is because they had insufficiently accurate data for that region). The picture on the right colors by apparent gas velocity: we expect the gas falling along filaments to exhibit coherent velocity trends, and that colormap is evidence that it does.

As for how this is helpful to anyone? I mean, not really. At the end of the day, it really is just a bunch of autists looking at stars and trying to understand how the universe works. But hey, it keeps them off the streets! And we've got plenty of autists working on real-world problems too.
 
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