bad art advice -

Saffronette

🍖Meat Muncher🍖
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Part of that may be due to the monopoly of proprietary image processing software in the early days of computers.

As for free art programs, I love Medibang's cross-platform service.
Yeah, that makes sense. I think Fire Alpaca and Medibang would be great starters for beginners. Krita has a bit of a learning curve that takes some getting used to, but it's worth the time in my opinion.
 

Marissa Moira

kiwifarms.net
Every word of bad art-advice, I know; most, already mentioned, from reading this thread. I'll keep mine short: just the three most common points of bad advice the most basic-bitch-brained "artists" defend, religiously, makes their (terrible and mediocre) art "acceptable." 1) Use guide (construction) lines/frames, or "stick-men" drawing, for figure drawings. 2) [Digital] Flip your image to make sure there's no asymmetry in human or animal bodies. 3) Develop your own style before you try others. Keeping this post short, I'll elaborate if asked, one point at a time.
I dunno I've always found under drawing/construction lines/ovals useful, even when doing sculpture. You build something complex up from simplicity. Like I'll get the motion of the pose down draw in the ovals for hips, head, and chest and build it up from there.
 
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CoronaVenom

TWISTED-GRAPHIX/ KODY AARON WALTERS
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I dunno I've always found under drawing/construction lines/ovals useful, even when doing sculpture. You build something complex up from simplicity. Like I'll get the motion of the pose down draw in the ovals for hips, head, and chest and build it up from there.
Learning to draw organic subjects without construction lines seems counterproductive, however, drawing without construction lines teaches your hand and eye how to draw things with a natural flow. Construction lines tend to give organic subjects an unnatural appearance, a stiffness to human form, for example. My college teachers were absolute on removing the "construction crutch," as they called it. Every student is often resistant against learning to draw without something they've learned from cheap "how to draw" books, but, once learned there's a greater pay off, a natural flow and organic look to the human figure.
 

sadbird

kiwifarms.net
"gesture" is becoming a bit of a meme, it's good for learning how to bang out a quick pose and put life into one but it's not the end all be all and barely the start. So I don't like how it's presented as being anything more than a tool to help your poses.
Personally speaking I have a big disregard for nitpick criticisms "x looks wrong" type things, which is the only examples of bad advice I've ever been given. I don't think all criticisms are somehow equal in their worth, and I've found a lot of the time the nitpicking comes from those with limited art experience or people holding something against you the same way sjws moan when they see anime girls with tiny waists or big boobs.

Every word of bad art-advice, I know; most, already mentioned, from reading this thread. I'll keep mine short: just the three most common points of bad advice the most basic-bitch-brained "artists" defend, religiously, makes their (terrible and mediocre) art "acceptable." 1) Use guide (construction) lines/frames, or "stick-men" drawing, for figure drawings. 2) [Digital] Flip your image to make sure there's no asymmetry in human or animal bodies. 3) Develop your own style before you try others. Keeping this post short, I'll elaborate if asked, one point at a time.
afaik image flipping was supposed to keep you from drawing things leaning to one side too much
 

Xolanite

Caffeinated Idol <3
kiwifarms.net
I don't know if this counts as bad art advice exactly, but it bothers me when people suggest only using Paint Tool SAI and Photoshop for digital art.

People often torrent SAI which is very antiquated by now and it has issues saving PNGs. Plus, installing brushes on it is a chore. Photoshop isn't suited for drawing at all and lacks stabilizers. Whenever I mention free alternatives like Krita, they scoff at it and claim it's not good enough. Even though Krita is often updated with new features and has very helpful tools.
I use Clip Studio Paint. It's a great Photoshop alternative, if you're willing to wait on a sale.
 

Jewelsmakerguy

Domo Arigato
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I dunno I've always found under drawing/construction lines/ovals useful, even when doing sculpture. You build something complex up from simplicity. Like I'll get the motion of the pose down draw in the ovals for hips, head, and chest and build it up from there.
That's pretty much how I feel most of the time. Construction's great if you're trying to nail down a pose, learning to draw something for the first time or even for certain parts of the body (I can never get hands right without them, even with visual reference) or even hard inorganic objects like buildings and cars. But for most other things I just get a few shapes down, maybe add a basic skeleton and motion lines and go from there.
 
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Trilby

Sorry, but not sorry!
True & Honest Fan
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I use Clip Studio Paint. It's a great Photoshop alternative, if you're willing to wait on a sale.
Too bad I couldn't, but I didn't mind paying $50 for the "Pro" version.
 
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DDBCAE CBAADCBE

Buying a Switch & Animal Crossing with Trump bucks
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I had a friend who was taking art lessons through Utemy or whatever it's called. Anyways he turned out to be a total sped. He could apparently only draw when being instructed. Attempts to do so when not being instructed looked only slightly better that what Chris Chan can do. With Utemy however he could manage to make really amazing pencil drawn art that was incredibly lifelike and professional. I argued with him constantly that he could do it on his own but he would insist that he needed Utemy to show him how to "draw with his shoulder."
 

Pixy Misa

Your local evil magical girl.
kiwifarms.net
I had a friend who was taking art lessons through Utemy or whatever it's called. Anyways he turned out to be a total sped. He could apparently only draw when being instructed. Attempts to do so when not being instructed looked only slightly better that what Chris Chan can do. With Utemy however he could manage to make really amazing pencil drawn art that was incredibly lifelike and professional. I argued with him constantly that he could do it on his own but he would insist that he needed Utemy to show him how to "draw with his shoulder."

Wha a coincidence I was going to talk about this....

My #1 advice on how to avoid that is this::

You need to know exactly what you want to acomplish. You see actually a lot of art instruction can be divided in two big categories:

Artists that want to mostly Capture life vs Artists mostly draw from imagination.

Yes, all artists use reference,
But those two huge branches do exist. Ignoring this will cause people a lot of headaches. Let me explain: A lot of people want to draw from imagination, be it cartoons, or manga, comics etc, but they go with teacher that teaches how to "capture the model" instead and then be confused why their drawings from imgination are shit.

Artists that "capture life" usually aim at having their art in galleries: Think people that just want to copy a nice landscape or draw hyper realistic pencil drawings of a celebrity to share on facebook or a boomer that justs wants to draw their kids.

Take for example this:


1581135241388.png

100% done in ballpoint pens by a lawyer. It's amazing. But there is a catch: he can only do this by copying a photo. And that's the weakness of these "capture" artist. They are married to their reference. He couldn't draw this girl looking up or down from his mind.

Nothing wrong with that. Those artists were taught things like using grids as if it was a coloring book which are amzing for getting a likelness, but useless if you want, say, to draw manga or cartoons from imagination. Grids lke this:

1581136405248.png
.

This is in part due to deceptive marketing. There's a lot of scams in art education in places like udemy and youtube... so you will think you will be able to draw like your teacher from memory.... but turns out the course you are in is for copying. but I digress.

Point is if you want to draw manga and anime, and you aren't being taught construction (aka drawing with 3d from imagination), so you can draw your characters in any pose you wan from your mind, they're wasting your time.
 
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Megaroad 2012

I'M SO FUCKED UP.
kiwifarms.net
afaik image flipping was supposed to keep you from drawing things leaning to one side too much
Definitely helps if you can just sense something is off by a pinch but can't figure it out until you hold up your work reversed into the light.
 

Damn Furfag

S-S-Senpai, it's so big~
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I don't understand why people think that either medium will suddenly make their art better? That's not how it works.
It's the same with a lot of things. People think buying that shiny new tool will instantly turn them into a master, and that's in part because of the marketing may intentionally or unintentionally demonstrates the grand possibilities of said tool. This goes hand in hand with how the world lacks patience and discipline, because we now expect instant gratification out of everything and refuse to humble ourselves when we think we're the best in the world. But clearly 99.99999% of people aren't.
 
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Pixy Misa

Your local evil magical girl.
kiwifarms.net
One of the worst advice out there:

Relying 100% on youtube tutorials/udemy/ skillshare/ [Insert crappy paid site here] for art education

No. Just no.

OK, I can already see the pitchforks out there, but hear me out. Yes, there are some good art channels out there(ex Proko), but I can say with 100% confidence that 90% of the "art education" out there is either really bad or filled with nothing but con-artists and scams.

The few reputable ones, (CGMA, Watts Atelier, NMA etc) can be ridiculously expensive and they are only truly worth it for people trying to go pro in an illustration career. If you aren't into "drawing like the old masters", past a certain point you will be going off a huge tangent, especially if all you wanted was just drawing comics/manga/ fan art for fun. A lot of amazing fanart is made by hobbyists that have never even heard of any of those sites.

Bad news? This is controversial in art communities, but truth be told, is that a lot of artist do gatekeep a lot of knowledge because they want you to depend on them for you to pay their patreons or to keep selling you shit courses. Lots of paid material is so bad that even after pirating it you would still feel scammed. I have seen $600 courses that are basically worthless

Even youtube isn't immune. It's free, but a lot of artists simply will conveniently not mention a lot of essential information when they make tutorials to sell you something.

*Ross Draws* *cough cough* Say this:


Can't draw amazing portraits after seeing that video? Using a soft brush and layer dodge doesn't make your art look great? Congratulations! You are a normal person.

Notice how he doesn't mention anything actually useful like "planes of the face" or soft vs hard edges? Texture? That's not a bug, it's a feature. (Spoiler: his Patreon content is also worthless for learning). That's what gatekeeping is.

Good news? Most of the best info is in books, And not even obscure ones. How to draw the Marvel way, Loomis, Scott Robertson, etc. All are more worth your time, and the best part is that they are free.
 
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Trilby

Sorry, but not sorry!
True & Honest Fan
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Good news? Most of the best info is in books, And not even obscure ones. How to draw the Marvel way, Loomis, Scott Robertson, etc. All are more worth your time, and the best part is that they are free.
I would vouch for the Loomis books, pdf's of all of then have floated around the web for years and some are back in print too.
 

Imposteroak

Actually the real Oak
kiwifarms.net
Its important to know that almost every piece of art advice or illustration "rules" have been broken or disregarded entirely by many talented and successful artists. The rules your favorite artists swear by are useful if you want to draw like them, but aren't the end all be all.

Learning to draw organic subjects without construction lines seems counterproductive, however, drawing without construction lines teaches your hand and eye how to draw things with a natural flow. Construction lines tend to give organic subjects an unnatural appearance, a stiffness to human form, for example. My college teachers were absolute on removing the "construction crutch," as they called it. Every student is often resistant against learning to draw without something they've learned from cheap "how to draw" books, but, once learned there's a greater pay off, a natural flow and organic look to the human figure.
This is pretty interesting, I know there are artists that draw without construction lines, (generally the more talented ones.) but I haven't run across many people discouraging the use of them. I generally study stuff related to cartoons and comics, and construction lines are pretty useful when you have to reproduce the same figure over and over again. I've even seen rough construction lines in some story boards and animatics. That being said you don't have to be a terribly great draftsman to animate or create comics. Would I be wrong in assuming you were an illustration student?

Edit: Spelling
 
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