Boy hit by cheese and dies, mother lashes out at bully - So allergic that even seeing the word cheese could kill him.

AnOminous

do you see what happens
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I'll have to reserve judgment until I actually read an autopsy report and get some more details from the cops and other students but right now it sounds like another case of a kid getting fucked over because it took so long to get his emergency medication, then everybody got scared to use the other available Epi-Pens because of muh liability and so they instead stood around with their thumbs up their asses.
There has already been a coroner's inquest and it returned a verdict which was more or less that.

Apparently, there was a "spreadsheet error" which means human error to me which led to the out of date medicine.

Then after the first didn't work they incorrectly thought they couldn't administer another for ten minutes.

Just another bongland disaster where they take away your rights to take care of yourself and then kill you with bureaucratic stupidity, although I could easily see this happening in the U.S. because the U.S. educational system is full of bongland tier idiots too.

the epipen thing was a mistake on the school's part. Obviously they should have used an unexpired pen from another kit since there were so many others available.
In reality, if a kid needs something where it needs to be immediately administered or they fucking die, they have it on them at all times, not in a locked filing cabinet where some failure who couldn't get a real EMT job has to be woken up from a drunken stupor to administer it minutes later.

But no, nobody is allowed to have so much as an aspirin for any reason at all.
 

repentance

True & Honest Fan
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They should not have used expired medication in the first place (some medicines become less potent after expiring, some become more potent, some toxic, it is impossible to tell once you put the drugs into a patient so you can't give subsequent doses with confidence). I also wonder why there is not a regular audit of medications in the nurses office (or a calendar for recording expiration dates) so they can be disposed of/replaced. This is absolutely standard procedure for every health profession. It is a stretch to make the mom responsible for checking the date written on the pen that had been left at the school's office a long time ago.

the death looks more and more like the school's fault.
A school is not a health care provider. It's not prescribing the drugs or obtaining them for the students. They're being provided by the parents, so yes it is ultimately the parents' responsibility to ensure that they're providing the school with medication that has a long enough expiry date to last the school year (you'd want to send a new Epipen every year precisely because they have a relatively limited shelf life), just as it's the parents' responsibility to ensure that any medication for home use is within date.

It's not reasonable to expect schools to know the ins and outs of each student's particular health issues. The best you can expect is that they'll follow a written plan from the student's doctor - something which they didn't have in this instance (again, it's the responsibility of the parent to ensure they have this). The level of first aid training teachers and other staff have is generally extremely limited, making them largely dependent on external guidance in an emergency.

This is just one of those "seconds from disaster" situations where a series of events combined to produce a catastrophic outcome.

In reality, if a kid needs something where it needs to be immediately administered or they fucking die, they have it on them at all times, not in a locked filing cabinet where some failure who couldn't get a real EMT job has to be woken up from a drunken stupor to administer it minutes later.

But no, nobody is allowed to have so much as an aspirin for any reason at all.
Maybe there also need to be special allergen-free schools for these kids instead of trying to force mainstream schools to accommodate them when they don't really have the resources to do so.

The coroner mentioned that there is little awareness of allergies at a national level, so I expect that her recommendations would have addressed that. Likewise, her recommendations likely included more and better education at the school level and some kind of standardised emergency first aid protocol which doesn't rely on what people think is the correct course of action. I expect that her recommendations won't be binding, though.
 
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sperginity

everything is terrible
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A school is not a health care provider. It's not prescribing the drugs or obtaining them for the students. They're being provided by the parents, so yes it is ultimately the parents' responsibility to ensure that they're providing the school with medication that has a long enough expiry date to last the school year (you'd want to send a new Epipen every year precisely because they have a relatively limited shelf life), just as it's the parents' responsibility to ensure that any medication for home use is within date.
who said anything about prescribing or obtaining? I was talking about a system to avoid dispensing expired medication, which is the duty of people who dispense medication (like nurses), which would give parents a chance to obtain non-expired medications in a timely manner. epi pens are good for 18 months. The drug physically stays at the school, it is more practical for someone who works there to check the dates while they dispense drugs each day. It is hard to say if that would have made a difference in this case, but maybe it would.

this is basically a non-issue in this specific case because they had non-expired epi pens available and failed to use them, and failed to tell the ambulance about the allergy so they were not aware of the need for it.
 

AnOminous

do you see what happens
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who said anything about prescribing or obtaining? I was talking about a system to avoid dispensing expired medication, which is the duty of people who dispense medication (like nurses), which would give parents a chance to obtain non-expired medications in a timely manner.
They had such a system and it didn't work.
 

repentance

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who said anything about prescribing or obtaining? I was talking about a system to avoid dispensing expired medication, which is the duty of people who dispense medication (like nurses), which would give parents a chance to obtain non-expired medications in a timely manner. epi pens are good for 18 months. The drug physically stays at the school, it is more practical for someone who works there to check the dates while they dispense drugs each day. It is hard to say if that would have made a difference in this case, but maybe it would.

this is basically a non-issue in this specific case because they had non-expired epi pens available and failed to use them, and failed to tell the ambulance about the allergy so they were not aware of the need for it.
The coroner was unable to find that the kid would have survived had he been given two doses of in date epi. The most she could say was that it might have increased his chance of survival. His reaction was atypical - to the point of being called "unprecedented" by an expert in the field - even for someone known to experience anaphylaxis.

The ambulance dispatcher might not have been told that he was experiencing an anaphylaxis, but those who first arrived on scene would have asked what happened and what treatment - if any - he'd been given. It's unclear exactly when he was given the expired epi relative to the arrival of the ambulance. It was a 4 day inquest and only tiny snippets of information have appeared in the media, so a lot of crucial information is missing.

I absolutely think the staff should have used the Epipens they had available. If they were worried about the domino effect, then they could have sent another staff member to a pharmacy with some petty cash to immediately replace them.

I also understand, though, why they don't use other students' medication as a matter of policy. When it comes to asthma inhalers and insulin/glucagon, you don't want to risk the student needing it before it can be replaced. The range of medications schools are now expected to dispense to students has become ridiculous (there was no such thing as a medication bell when I was at school) and keeping on top of it is beyond the scope of basic management systems which were probably created decades ago. I expect that most schools would rather not have to deal with it at all.
 
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sperginity

everything is terrible
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They had such a system and it didn't work.
wow that's quite a thing to fuck up, a system that is as difficult as the cafeteria workers having to follow the lunch schedule. It seems like the only people who actually want to work in public schools tend to be this fucking stupid. Most people with an ounce of intellectual curiosity won't settle for teaching really rudimentary concepts to ungrateful kids year after year.
 

repentance

True & Honest Fan
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wow that's quite a thing to fuck up, a system that is as difficult as the cafeteria workers having to follow the lunch schedule.
Despite sophisticated medication management systems and an educated workforce, medication errors happen in hospitals all the time.

It seems obvious from the outside that the expiry dates of medications should have been logged when they were provided to the school so that a report could be generated each week of those which would need replacement soon.

Additionally, there needed to be regular physical audits to ensure that medication was where it should be and that the information on the spreadsheet was correct, as well as to confirm that the school had current action plans.

All of this stuff should be standardised across the education system rather than individual schools coming up with their own plans.
 

AnOminous

do you see what happens
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All of this stuff should be standardised across the education system rather than individual schools coming up with their own plans.
But that would require the intervention of an intrusive national government that was given such incredible power and prominence for the good of the people. . .right?

Seriously if you're going to have a fucking nanny state it should do some competent nannying but apparently it can't.

This shit is why you don't trust governments in the fucking first place.
 

Echo_Ender

Doggo
kiwifarms.net
Never heard of just TOUCHING something to cause shit like this...

Either the kid had a freakishly bad allergy that made him a ticking time bomb...

...or the dumbass ingested something else he was allergic to and the cheese just made him freak out and accelerate the reaction from that.
 
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Belvedere

kiwifarms.net
Sorry to be blunt but this is natural selection at work. Someone that is allergic to so many sources of nourishment is a detriment to the human gene pool. The whole reason why humans are the only mammals that are able to consume dairy even after the lactation period is over is because in some moment in the past a common ancestor developed the resistance to lactose which proved to be an advantage over those who didn't. A human group with that tolerance has access to a source of protein other groups did not and that helped them flourish. It is bad enough that Pakistani "culture" perpetuate practices that produce offspring who are a destined to be a burden to the rest of society due to their lower IQs and genetic malformations but they are undoing millennia of human evolutionary adaptations in the process. There is just so much modern society can do to protect these individual but at some point nature is going to step it and wreck your shit for over reaching beyond certain bounds.
 

LegoTugboat

True & Honest Fan
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The mother's done another interview.

I'll just do a tl;dr and mention some other bits that have come up.

Rina Cheema's son Karan was at school when another pupil threw cheese at him, causing him to have a severe allergic reaction.

Now, the 53-year-old has revealed the family hadn't wanted to switch off the life support machine, but that a comforting look on the 13-year-old's face helped her get through the ordeal.

Speaking to Holly and Phil on This morning she said: 'We didn’t want to switch it off – it wasn’t fair on his little body to go through this.

Karan was in hospital for ten days before the decision was taken to turn off his life support machine. In that time his body had deteriorated, going into cardiac arrest and suffering from brain damage and lack of oxygen to the brain.

The cheese thrown at Karan, no bigger than half the size of a Post-It note, caused an 'extraordinary reaction' after coming into contact with his skin, one which an expert at the inquest described as 'unprecedented' in medical circles.

When asked by Phil where the situation all went wrong, Ms Cheema said 'education'.

She has now called for more education in schools and from parents, as she says allergies continue to cause deaths due to a lack of education.

She highlighted that education starts at home with other parents. To understand now that allergies are so common. If someone said to your you're going to have a heart attack, you would respond straight away.

'If somebody said you have got an allergy, it's not taken so seriously.

'I'm numb, still devastated, it's hard to forgive, hard to believe there was a lack of understanding especially when the child was warned not to do it. My son wasn’t safe guarded.

When asked on her opinion of the boy who flicked the cheese at her son, Ms Cheema said it's 'hard to forgive'.
 

Far Queue

kiwifarms.net
But that would require the intervention of an intrusive national government that was given such incredible power and prominence for the good of the people. . .right?

Seriously if you're going to have a fucking nanny state it should do some competent nannying but apparently it can't.

This shit is why you don't trust governments in the fucking first place.
This is why nanny states never work out. They don't have any real incentive to be competent. If they fuck up it isn't like you can just go down the street so some other nanny state for better service.
 

DanteAlighieri

Anti authoritarian asshole asshole
kiwifarms.net
The mother's done another interview.

I'll just do a tl;dr and mention some other bits that have come up.



The older a woman is when she has a kid, the more complications there can be with the child, and deathly allergies is one of them. And holy shit how the fuck can you blame a child when yours is weak enough that skin contact cheese is enough to send him to the hospital?!
 

Fish-Eyed Fool

How'd you like one across your lip?
kiwifarms.net
The older a woman is when she has a kid, the more complications there can be with the child, and deathly allergies is one of them. And holy shit how the fuck can you blame a child when yours is weak enough that skin contact cheese is enough to send him to the hospital?!
Grief ain't logical.
 

Bunny Tracks

Addicted to a certain kind of sadness
kiwifarms.net
But really, you knew this kid was allergic and you decided to throw it anyway.
The article said that he knew Karan was allergic to bread, but not to dairy. When Karan told him he was after he threw the cheese at him, he apologized. He was also apparently throwing food at other kids. I don't think he should've been arrested for attempted murder, or arrested for anything. While his actions were indeed dickish, and considering what they resulted in, more than worthy of him getting expelled, he should not be prosecuted for them. If anything, the school be prosecuted since they dropped the ball so fucking hard.

I can't really be mad at the mom, or blame the son in this case, either. Grief makes you do illogical things, and this kid just got a really shitty hand dealt to him.
 
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