Bread Bakin' Bitches - Bitches bakin' bread and other yeasty shit

kcbbq

Once.
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I don't do bread machines. Any other hand-crafted bread bitches hand knead in the bowl?
Rather than turn the dough onto the counter (what a mess), I use one hand to hold the bowl and one hand to knead it in the bowl. I've made hundreds of loaves and rolls this way with many compliments.
I'm too lazy to not use my stand mixer + dough hook.

Not too lazy to not mill flour for the bread, or at least half the flour. Can't match the fineness of commercial flours at home and using too much stone ground flour is just one more thing that slows down fermentation.

I used to hand knead in a bowl, too, but now I just want the smell of baking bread asap.
 
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MerriedxReldnahc

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I make fuckin' delicious biscuits in general, but the ones I made last night were amazing. I wanted to test out my 7-well cast iron pan and was looking for a good recipe and came across one from the Lodge website: http://www.lodgemfg.com/recipe/briggs-buttermilk-biscuits
I never use self-rising flour, so I took a Pioneer Woman recipe and based the dry measurements off of her biscuits. I did some other fudging and the results were amazing. All you need is some butter, honey, and maybe some Jimmy Dean sausage patties.
 

malucifer

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Reviving the thread because there's no reason to create another one.

I love baking (cookies, bread, muffins, cupcakes, etc), my current dream (I dream small, please forgive me) is a Kitchenaid mixer. I mix my bread dough by hand - I make bread at least once a week - and it's fine, especially since I make small batches. I'm always happy to try new recipes, if anyone wants to share.
 
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AnOminous

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I've been trying the no-knead bread that's been popular lately and I really like the toothy crust it gets. I don't have a dutch oven but have seen others using a skillet and this mostly works.

Whether I do it covered or not, though, the inside seems damp-ish when it cools down, and this is slightly less than optimal. Obviously, I don't want it dry, but using any less water (than in the recipe) doesn't result in a very usable dough.

(The point of these no-knead recipes is taking a really basic bread, flour, water, salt and yeast, but only a very very small amount of yeast, and then letting it rise a long time. After the long rise, it's really airy and puffy as if it had been kneaded in the first place.)
 

assburger-king

you cant spell therapist without the rapist
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I find that doing a light mix where the dough is still somewhat shaggy, combined with long rest times and 2-3 folds works really well. I find it helps keep the bread a lot more tender. Also if you have the time starting with a an autolyse, which is a rough mix of just your flour, water and yeast/sourdough starter, and letting it rest about 30 minutes before adding your salt, really increases the activity of the yeast and gives great flavor
 

DuckSucker

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Whether I do it covered or not, though, the inside seems damp-ish when it cools down, and this is slightly less than optimal. Obviously, I don't want it dry, but using any less water (than in the recipe) doesn't result in a very usable dough.
High hydration dough is usually like this. What's good to do when it's like that, is griddle it. Put butter on both sides, and throw it on a griddle until youve got toast. You get a nice crust and the inside is soft and delicious. Put some jam or something.

What do you mean damp, like it wasnt fully cooked?

Tartine's recipe is something Ive memorized and I believe it's similar to a lot of the no-knead breads, it's 500g flour, 375g water, 100g starter and 10g salt, I think its something like 75% hydration when accounting for the starter, but he says it's 70% (He also uses a not-entirely proofed starter so there isnt a lot of acid but it's still got some sourdough flavor, it's like 4 hours into the starter cycle instead of the usual 8 where it peaks and collapses). When cooked at high heat it gets a nice toothy crust, but the inside is soft and almost custardy, but it isnt like raw or par-cooked dough, you can press it and it will spring back. It's just sort of soft, springy but delicate and moist in a way.

It's hard to describe but if it's a real issue, you can probably play around with temperature and time to try and balance how the crust cooks versus the internal temperature of the dough.
 
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AnOminous

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I find that doing a light mix where the dough is still somewhat shaggy, combined with long rest times and 2-3 folds works really well. I find it helps keep the bread a lot more tender. Also if you have the time starting with a an autolyse, which is a rough mix of just your flour, water and yeast/sourdough starter, and letting it rest about 30 minutes before adding your salt, really increases the activity of the yeast and gives great flavor
I just started with the water and yeast this time and let it bloom for a while, then aerated the flour before using it. This had somewhat better results. I may just not like the results of the most popular no-knead recipe.

What do you mean damp, like it wasnt fully cooked?
It was fine when it started hot, but just seemed somehow too cool and damp once it cooled down. The next batch was better and less dense. It also expanded a lot more to the point it overflowed the container I was using, which wasn't really an issue.

I think the salt seems to inhibit the yeast activating.
 
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Pizza Munch

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Bumping this thread. Just got into making bread and would love to try some new recipes. Been making this basic loaf lately it’s p fire

 
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StrawberryDouche

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Bumping this thread. Just got into making bread and would love to try some new recipes. Been making this basic loaf lately it’s p fire

Every recipe I have tried from this woman SLAPS. These are two of my favs. Nothing I have tried from her has failed.



Like assburgerking said, always do an autolyse. You can also do an overnight pre-ferment if you remember. Both will dramatically improve your finished product.

Add about 1ts of gluten per cup of flour. This significantly improves chew and pull for products like pizza dough and bagels. Home cooks don't have access to the super high protein level flours commercial bakeries do. This fixes that.

If you don't have a fancy ass cast iron dutch oven, go to the thrift store and get an old ceramic insert for a crock pot with a glass lid. Bonus use for this is, you can heat the fuck out of it then throw in a whole chicken. You get rotisserie level chicken in about an hour.
 

Mr. Skeltal

Calcium fortified at your own risk
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My go to bread recently has been a King Arthur Flour recipe for their French styled country loaf. It's a great all rounder bread, useful in many dishes as breadcrumbs or on its own. I like letting my dough cold ferment to get some nice flavor but not too much like sourdough.

Oddly enough challah bread is one of my favorites to make despite me not being a one of Trump's Chosen People. Egg breads are always good and braiding dough is a very fun process once you get the hang of it. I do like my challah mildly sweet, so I tend to go a bit overboard on the honey, not that it impacts leavening much.
 
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Nanook Rubs It

The Naughty Eskimo
kiwifarms.net
I've been trying the no-knead bread that's been popular lately and I really like the toothy crust it gets. I don't have a dutch oven but have seen others using a skillet and this mostly works.

Whether I do it covered or not, though, the inside seems damp-ish when it cools down, and this is slightly less than optimal. Obviously, I don't want it dry, but using any less water (than in the recipe) doesn't result in a very usable dough.

(The point of these no-knead recipes is taking a really basic bread, flour, water, salt and yeast, but only a very very small amount of yeast, and then letting it rise a long time. After the long rise, it's really airy and puffy as if it had been kneaded in the first place.)
That sounds horrible. You poor man.
 

SmileyTimeDayCare

This is pleasure!
kiwifarms.net
I make almost all of my bread products. Everything has been infiltrated by questionable oils and additives. Grands for example no longer have dairy in them. They use like palm oil and some other oil to make up the flavor so any that you don't finish have a creep film that coats your mouth.

One of the biggest benefits of doing it that way is that you don't have bread sitting around.

There is also the positives of the smell of baking bread. Swear it is an effective mood booster.
 

BONE_Buddy

/milsperg/
kiwifarms.net
Mini-necro of this thread, but I have recent gotten back into wanting to bake bread.

So, I started with the most dead simple recipe I could find:

And yes, it was the simplest bread I have ever made. Of course it used dry-active yeast, and I used Bread-Flour because, ironically enough, it was the only thing I had on hand.

So, how did it turn out?

For a bread that had about 10 minutes of actual hand on work, not bad at all.

Of course, I want to move on to better things. Like maintaining/using a starter again, and recipes by weight.
_
Also, because this is a thread for bread, I thought I might repost @Mr. Skeltal 's recipe (I hope that is OK with you).

Keeping a written/printed record of commonly used recipes is essential. In a doomer SHTF scenario telecom is probably one of the first utilities to go.
425g starter (normally around 400g but my recipe uses no instant yeast)
450-480g flour (unbleached bread flour preferred, can mix all purpose and whole wheat if desired)
1 1/2 - 2 1/4 tsp salt to taste
14g sugar Anything high in sugar will work (honey, brown sugar, molasses, maple syrup, etc...), but white sugar has a neutral flavor.
227g of lukewarm (~100°F) water

Process
Make desired amount of starter, let bloom until an active sponge is achieved.
Mix starter, sugar, and warm water.
Add flour and fold until dough is a shaggy but coalesced mass - add salt at this stage if you don't mind slightly inhibited yeast and longer ferment time.
Let autolyse for 20 minutes to one hour to allow flour to fully hydrate, aids in gluten formation.
Knead dough until smooth, pliant, and tacky (not sticky); about 10 to 12 minutes. You may add up to 3/4 cup of flour if dough is overhydrated, use best judgement.
Move to a lightly oiled bowl to rise. Any (edible) oil will work, oil is present to facilitate dough removal when rising is complete. Cover with clean kitchen towel if rising for a short time, plastic wrap if longer than 16hrs.
Let dough rise for no less than 2 hours and no more than 16hrs at room temperature. Maximum of three days if cold fermented inside a refrigerator.
Gently deflate dough and move to lightly floured surface, shape into one or two loaves.
Let rest and rise on a parchment lined, cornmeal/semolina lined baking sheet.
Preheat oven to 475°F
Score loaves with a baker's lame (regular old safety razor or very sharp knife works just fine) and place in oven after loaves double in size.
Bake for 25-30 minutes. Smaller loaves bake faster.
With a clean spray bottle, mist the inside of the oven. Repeat this periodically for the first 15 minutes of baking. Alternatively a cast iron pan brought to temperature and scalded with boiling water can be used to provide needed humidity.
Reduce heat to 450 after the first 15 minutes, turn baking sheet if necessary.
Remove from oven when bread reaches 190°F internally (lol, using a thermometer for bread) or when crust is a deep golden brown.
Remove from oven, cool bread to room temperature.
Bread should be a deep golden brown and have a hollow sound when tapped.
Eat fresh within one week, refrigerate for up to 2 weeks, freeze for month+ storage.

To sourdough this recipe, allow for longer fermentation time. Allowing the starter to ferment beforehand is also a good method to impart a fermented flavor to the finished bread.
Another fun bread is challah oy vey, but it keeps worse due to being an egg bread. Never sourdough egg breads.

EDIT: Use an iodine fortified sea salt if possible to give the finished bread a compliment of essential micronutrients/minerals if in a SHTF scenario. It will yield a slightly unpleasant taste but the last thing you need is to be iodine deficient in a doomer's wet dream scenario.
 
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