Brenton Tarrant posts on 8chan, shoots up Mosque killing 49 muslims in New Zealand, livestreams from GoPro -

Take away the Guns, Censor the Video, Throw people in Jail for Having the Video, or do it all?

  • Just take the guns, it'll work out fine.

    Votes: 55 6.3%
  • Doesn't matter, it's Trump's Fault.

    Votes: 216 24.7%
  • Just ban the video, it's totally doable.

    Votes: 30 3.4%
  • DO EVERYTHING!

    Votes: 176 20.1%
  • Make Null turn us over, that'll make us safe.

    Votes: 398 45.5%

  • Total voters
    875

millais

The Yellow Rose of Victoria, Texas
kiwifarms.net
I think it's kind of hilarious that the FBI is trying to introduce bog-standard CNN-style Russophobia into the white supremacist scene.

This could mean one of two things:

(a) That agent is deliberately doing one of the dumbest things I could imagine and getting paid for it.

(b) His boss is ordering him to do it which makes the FBI's upper echelons even dumber than the guy posting on /pol/
even if the Russians had been involved, the alt righters would have still supported it and gone on at length about Based Slavs. As long as kebab is being removed, I'm sure they are not very picky about who is doing the removal
 

AnOminous

do you see what happens
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
kiwifarms.net
I think it's kind of hilarious that the FBI is trying to introduce bog-standard CNN-style Russophobia into the white supremacist scene.
And being a complete idiot and not understanding the culture in the least, the result will be anyone remotely critical of Russia is going to be called a fed and probably banned on sight on 8/pol/
 

Coldgrip

Dragon Kick your ass into the Milky Way.
kiwifarms.net
I think it's kind of hilarious that the FBI is trying to introduce bog-standard CNN-style Russophobia into the white supremacist scene.

This could mean one of two things:

(a) That agent is deliberately doing one of the dumbest things I could imagine and getting paid for it.

(b) His boss is ordering him to do it which makes the FBI's upper echelons even dumber than the guy posting on /pol/
It's the FBI, so could be both.
 

V0dka

I'm drunk.
kiwifarms.net
It's been 3 months since his attack and there hasn't been some huge terrorism wave nor has the USA called for gun confiscation squads. If anything his big worldwide influence was speeding up the process of mass internet censorship.
Well he is an accelerationist, either people do something, or they turn over and die.
 

nonvir_1984

Never amount to anything! And they were right.
kiwifarms.net
When you look at what they are complaining about, and what they want, it is only going to fuel anti-Muslim sentiment in some quarters.

Christchurch Victims Say New Zealand Has Fallen Short of Lofty Promises

By Charlotte Graham-McLay
June 20, 2019
CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand — Temel Atacocugu is fed up. Forced to spend most days on the couch in his Christchurch home, he is beginning a long recovery from the nine gunshot wounds he suffered in March when a terrorist fired on Muslim worshipers in this New Zealand city.
Again and again, Mr. Atacocugu has asked when New Zealand’s immigration agency will allow his mother and nephew to join him in Christchurch from Turkey. He needs them to help care for him as he adjusts to his new life. But a month has passed since their visa applications were filed, and no answer has come.
Robbed of what he loves to do most — hiking, fishing, sports, working at his kebab shop — he has started to feel depressed and desperately lonely. “This is really hurting me,” said Mr. Atacocugu, who has lived in the country for a decade and is a citizen. “I am a New Zealander, too.”
Mr. Atacocugu is one of a number of victims of the attacks — in addition to the 51 people killed, more than 40 were injured, some permanently — who say that the New Zealand government has not met the high bar it set in helping them piece their lives back together.
Three days after the March 15 attacks, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern delivered an emotional speech to Parliament emphasizing the government’s obligation to those affected. “We feel a huge duty of care to them,” she said. “We have so much we feel the need to say and to do.”
Three days after that, she moved to ban the sort of semiautomatic weapons that were used in the Christchurch slaughter.
Those words and actions led to global praise for the New Zealand government for what was seen as a swift and compassionate response to the massacre. They also raised expectations among the victims — an optimism they say is now evaporating in the face of government bureaucracy.
Like Mr. Atacocugu, 43, many say New Zealand’s immigration system is struggling to respond to victims’ wishes to bring their relatives to the country to provide physical and emotional support.

In April, the government announced what it called a “significant” offer of permanent resident visas to victims’ and survivors’ immediate relatives, but advocates say the rules governing who qualifies are too narrow.
Victims have also criticized what they call an opaque process for allocating funds raised for the survivors and the families of the dead. The money is being distributed by an organization called Victim Support, which offered its services after the attacks. Some survivors have said that the amounts of money they have received have been smaller than expected, and that the government should have added to the pot.
Perhaps most frustrating is the sense among some survivors, including Mr. Atacocugu, that officials simply do not understand the magnitude of the challenges they face: the trauma, the injuries, the inability to financially support themselves.
“For the first time, I started to be really angry last night,” he said one day last week, recalling a conversation with the government employee assigned to help him, who, while well-meaning, did not have the answers he needed.
In the meantime, Mr. Atacocugu is facing a wait of almost a year until the man accused of shooting him is brought to trial. At a court appearance by the defendant, Brenton H. Tarrant, in April, Mr. Atacocugu was brought into the public gallery in a wheelchair, ashen and blank-faced. He was back in court last Friday, walking with a crutch, as Mr. Tarrant pleaded not guilty to 92 counts, including murder and terrorism.
The New Zealand government has taken a variety of actions to help the victims and families of the dead. The government has assigned case managers to each of those affected, and it has covered funeral costs for those killed. Police officers are offering driving lessons to women whose husbands died. And a state-funded program is paying 80 percent of the previous earnings of those who were physically injured.
(This, however, has also been a point of contention: Some survivors who were not wounded and do not qualify for the money say they are too mentally traumatized to work and need financial assistance.)
Part of the problem is that the government, which has never before dealt with such an event in New Zealand’s largely peaceful history, has not been specific about its long-term plans for ensuring the families’ welfare.
Kate Gilmore, the United Nations deputy high commissioner for human rights, who visited Christchurch in April, said New Zealand’s leadership “would stand out for some time” on the world stage. But she questioned the government’s decision to prioritize gun reform and an inquiry into possible intelligence failures before making it clear to the families how they would be cared for.
“It’s fantastic to have this sense of ‘we won’t hate, we’ll love,’ but how is that delivering materially for the survivors?” Ms. Gilmore said.
Mr. Atacocugu, who was shot in the jaw, one arm, both legs and his hips, has been told by his doctors that he can expect a physical recovery of three to five years, and an unknown number of surgeries.
The government has provided him with compensation under the state-funded program and taxis to take him to medical appointments. But he is struggling to service the loan on his kebab business.
His sister, who arrived from Turkey on March 23, has provided 24-hour care for him. She left her own work and family, and Mr. Atacocugu is trying to get answers on whether the government will compensate her, given that it would need to provide him with paid care otherwise.
It would help, Mr. Atacocugu said, to see his mother, as well as his nephew — who can drive, and could take him fishing, or “just to smell the fresh air,” he said.
Megan Woods, the lawmaker coordinating the government’s response to the attacks, said in a statement that the prospect of victims navigating “a thicket of different government agencies” was why she had advocated the assignment of “individual case managers to work with each of the affected families.” The government declined to comment beyond the statement.
The case managers have helped, some victims said, but the workers can do only so much in the face of systemic obstacles.
While the government moved quickly to offer permanent resident visas to victims’ and survivors’ immediate relatives, Zhiyan Basharati, a community organizer, said at least half of those affected wanted to bring relatives who did not fit the criteria.
“The categories are very narrow, and every person comes with a story,” she said. “If you’re disabled because of the shooting and your brother’s come here to help you, your brother has a family, too.”
Many of the affected families have also questioned the method by which the more than $7 million raised from public donations is being distributed.
Those hurt at the mosques, and the families of those who died, have received three lump sum payments. But Victim Support only recently started to consult those affected about how the funds should be divided up and who should get what. One payment is left to be distributed.
Kenneth R. Feinberg, a lawyer who has managed many of the United States’ highest-profile disaster funds since 9/11, said the problems were largely avoidable.
He said speed, transparency and communication were crucial to making victims feel heard. But New Zealand, unlike the United States after recent disasters, has not publicly named a single person to be responsible for making compensation decisions and ensuring that those priorities are met.
Abdul Aziz, who is originally from Afghanistan, is among the survivors of the attacks who said transparency had been missing in New Zealand.
“These people sitting back in Auckland, or Wellington, they didn’t see nothing, they didn’t go through anything themselves,” said Mr. Aziz, referring to officials in the capital and the largest city. “And now they’re deciding for the victims who’s the real victims and who is not real victims.”

Mr. Aziz was not shot in the attacks, but he was credited with driving the gunman away from the Linwood mosque by throwing one of the terrorist’s weapons into the windshield of his car. He had drawn the gunman back toward the parking lot while his four sons screamed for him inside the mosque.
“I sleep two, three hours a day since the incident,” he said. But he has received a small fraction of the compensation that those with physical injuries have received because he did not suffer any.
Mr. Atacocugu, for his part, said he did not want to stay in Christchurch long term. He wants to purchase a small property somewhere quiet. He had hoped that the government’s promises might extend to helping the victims buy their first homes.
“I’ve had enough; I don’t want this anymore. I’m so tired,” he said. “Mentally I’m so tired, and physically. I hope one day I can start a peaceful life again.”
 

turboNIG-3k

Neither Rich nor Evans
kiwifarms.net
Jesus fuck why would you give them permanentresidence for getting shot, being a good bullet sponge isn't a skill useful in modern society. Giving it to their relatives is even more exceptional, but after encountering few kiwis online I have to say they have the government they deserve.

As in, there are few creatures more pathetic and despicable than the sheepfucking variety of anglo.
 

Azovka

I coulda been a contender
kiwifarms.net
While I have a lot of sympathy for the victims, it seems that those interviewed are really asking for too much.

“Pay for my brother to become a resident of New Zealand so he can take me go fishing.” Really?

What happened was a tragedy, and it is good that the victims were compensated, and their medical bills and transportation taken care of, but they’re literally asking for free houses now, and to bring their families (and thus their families’ families) into the country.
C’mon.
 

Trig.Point

I wouldn't start from here.
kiwifarms.net
Jesus fuck why would you give them permanentresidence for getting shot, being a good bullet sponge isn't a skill useful in modern society. Giving it to their relatives is even more exceptional, but after encountering few kiwis online I have to say they have the government they deserve.

As in, there are few creatures more pathetic and despicable than the sheepfucking variety of anglo.
They were going to get permanent residence anyway, deportation is a rare occurrence in New Zealand.
 

Alec Benson Leary

Creator of Asperchu
Christorical Figure
kiwifarms.net
Look, the government can't just magically provide disability and compensatory funding for victims whose lives have been upended and severely damaged. They have to put their resources into making sure no one is allowed watch videos on the internet. Why would these immigrants stand against that? Are they nazis or something?
 

Trig.Point

I wouldn't start from here.
kiwifarms.net
I wish they did like Australia and shipped the off to an island in the middle of fucking nowhere.
But they were ungrateful fucks, as you should expect any of these people to be
They don't need to because Australia stops the boats for them. If there was a jumping off country for migrants within a couple of hundred miles of New Zealand they wouldn't be nearly as enlightened.
 
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