Trashfire Carlos Maza / @gaywonk versus Steven Blake Crowder / @scrowder (#VoxAdpocalypse) - Twitter war between a Canadian in nationality and a Canadian in behavior

Y

YW 525

Guest
kiwifarms.net
Why do so many SJWs have a black and white filter on their social media profile?
Maybe to reflect how they actually view the world?
Look at his picture. His glasses are reflecting flames as if to imply that he's smugly watching the world burn. Which you would only do in a smug fashion if you helped bring about the destruction. And this is exactly what Carlos Maza is doing. Even the content of the tweet in question "Modern conservatism is just so boring" reflects this.

1.jpeg

Tim Pool once talked about being around journos of the millennial era and remarking at how many of them want to stir the pot to "make things interesting" and not to further any specific or meaningful narrative. I believe what Pool said in this instance because it reflects what I see. You have lots of journos out there that are either trying to cause a ruckus to get money or trying to cause a ruckus because they think that's what needs to happen nowadays.

Maza's picture shows him basking smugly before a sea of unseen flames. He mentions at the same time that conservatism is boring in response to someone bringing up a reasonable counter-argument to some shoe debate. And look at the counter-argument, it was posted without engaging in fake emotional bluster and was simply a statement of fact. How does Carlos respond? Conservatives are so boring. Stating the facts are just so boring. Not screaming like a maniac to prove how much feeling you have toward your opinion is simply boring.

Between the two of you, you've illustrated the perfect summation of who and what Carlos Maza is. Carlos Maza is a muckraker that is stirring the pot to make our world less boring. This means fighting in the street, censorship in our private lives, and the destruction of all wrong think. Because that's less boring.
 

Salt_Merchant

Sodium Connoisseur
kiwifarms.net
I know i should be shocked a verified twitter user can put a statement saying that someone they disagree with is a literal white supremacist and nothing is done about it.


But im not,
 

Secret Asshole

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I guess he's not careful from what he wished for because karma might play a dirty trick on him.
He might have fueled the acceleration to alternative platforms. Who knows? Maybe his stupid ass who pushed for corporate censorship (lol, how Marxist of you) of the working poor (conservatives, the proletariat, the workers you 'represent') will be one of the matches that ignites alternate platforms? The weirdest shit can happen.
 

5t3n0g0ph3r

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  • Agree
Reactions: Flexo

The Pink Panther

It eeez what it eeez
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View attachment 836433

Lmfao, he’s been “traumatized” over what exactly? All the attention and free publicity? All the ass pats the media has given him?

This lispy queer is a major narcissist.
Goddamn, what a literal faggot.

The conniving son of a bitch timed it in Pride Month so that he could fuck over Crowder. How is your manipulation traumatizing?
 

nets_awesome

Blocked from who? Everyone.
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On Instagram he refers to himself as a boy (I never understand the LGBTQIA whatever always referring to themselves as girls/boys) in his instastory and is begging his followers to send him “pop culture artifacts” to make him a “happy boy” again.
 

skeng

I failed 2nd grade ion give a fuck
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On Instagram he refers to himself as a boy (I never understand the LGBTQIA whatever always referring to themselves as girls/boys) in his instastory and is begging his followers to send him “pop culture artifacts” to make him a “happy boy” again.
if your personality was shallow enough to require constant vapid pop culture entertainment references for the sake of childhood nostalgia, wouldn't you?
 

AlexJonesGotMePregnant

he put a baby in my butt
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It's homo peter pan syndrome, possibly with an element of some BDSM play- "boy" is usually the sub. Gay "culture" is retarded.
 

CatParty

Boo
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YouTube drafting ‘creator-on-creator harassment’ rules after Steven Crowder incident


YouTube is working on new policies to prevent “creator-on-creator harassment” that it will announce later this year, the company said today. The statement was made by Youtube’s chief product officer, Neal Mohan, who briefly spoke about the issue at YouTube’s VidCon keynote this evening, where both creators and industry insiders were gathered in Anaheim, California.
The news didn’t come with any concrete details about what those policies will actually look like, but YouTube said it considers them to be “just as important to the YouTube community as any product launch.”
“Creator-on-creator harassment” doesn’t have a clear definition, but Mohan’s announcement comes after a series of incidents that fall under the description. In June, conservative pundit Steven Crowder’s use of homophobic language to attack Vox host Carlos Maza spawned a heated controversy about how YouTube should moderate speech on its platform and the extent to which it punishes popular creators. “The move wasn’t spurred by the incident between Crowder and Maza,” Mohan toldCNET, but it’s a safe assumption that incidents like it would fall under the new policies, as well as more internal community drama that leads to hurtful videos and amasses worldwide attention.
(Disclosure: Vox is a publication of Vox Media, which also owns The Verge.)
A YouTube spokesperson said that Mohan was referring to an announcement the company made in April. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote at the time that she takes it “very seriously when creators share stories of experiencing harassment on the platform” and that YouTube would “do more to discourage this from happening.” Wojcicki mentioned similar plans again last month at the Code Conference, saying it was “next on our list.”
After Maza tweeted about Crowder’s behavior in early June, YouTube briefly removed Crowder’s ability to earn ad revenue. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki later apologized to the LGBTQ community after many creators called the company out over its relative lack of action and poor messaging around the situation. Still, Wojcicki stood by the company’s decision not to remove Crowder’s videos or ban him entirely, stating that although YouTube did not agree with his actions and words, his videos didn’t constitute cyberbullying or harassment. The homophobic language, because it was apparently used in jest and as only fractions of longer videos attempting to rebut Maza’s Strikethrough series, didn’t violate YouTube’s policies as far as the company was concerned.
Yet YouTube’s current harassment and cyberbullying policies do state that content posted to deliberately humiliate someone, or content that makes hurtful personal comments about someone else, is in violation of its policies. That’s partially why YouTube saw so much negative feedback in wake of its decision to stand by Crowder, who many argued did violate those guidelines.
“Steven Crowder has a lot of videos, and it took some time for us to look at that and understand it in the context of the video because context really, really matters,” Wojcicki said at Recode’s CodeCon last month. “We looked at a large number of these videos and we decided they were not violative of our harassment policies.”
There is always room for YouTube to improve, Wojcicki said, but argued that she believes the company and the platform have come a long way. Having clear-cut policies that state what “creator-on-creator harassment” looks like could be a way to move those policies forward and set them in stone. It’s what the company has recently done with harmful and hateful content, specifically outlining a branch of content that was once deemed borderline content, and banning it.
 

MrDegeneratman

The Degenerate Rat
kiwifarms.net
After Maza tweeted about Crowder’s behavior in early June, YouTube briefly removed Crowder’s ability to earn ad revenue. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki later apologized to the LGBTQ community after many creators called the company out over its relative lack of action and poor messaging around the situation. Still, Wojcicki stood by the company’s decision not to remove Crowder’s videos or ban him entirely, stating that although YouTube did not agree with his actions and words, his videos didn’t constitute cyberbullying or harassment. The homophobic language, because it was apparently used in jest and as only fractions of longer videos attempting to rebut Maza’s Strikethrough series, didn’t violate YouTube’s policies as far as the company was concerned.

YouTube drafting ‘creator-on-creator harassment’ rules after Steven Crowder incident


YouTube is working on new policies to prevent “creator-on-creator harassment” that it will announce later this year, the company said today. The statement was made by Youtube’s chief product officer, Neal Mohan, who briefly spoke about the issue at YouTube’s VidCon keynote this evening, where both creators and industry insiders were gathered in Anaheim, California.
The news didn’t come with any concrete details about what those policies will actually look like, but YouTube said it considers them to be “just as important to the YouTube community as any product launch.”
“Creator-on-creator harassment” doesn’t have a clear definition, but Mohan’s announcement comes after a series of incidents that fall under the description. In June, conservative pundit Steven Crowder’s use of homophobic language to attack Vox host Carlos Maza spawned a heated controversy about how YouTube should moderate speech on its platform and the extent to which it punishes popular creators. “The move wasn’t spurred by the incident between Crowder and Maza,” Mohan toldCNET, but it’s a safe assumption that incidents like it would fall under the new policies, as well as more internal community drama that leads to hurtful videos and amasses worldwide attention.
(Disclosure: Vox is a publication of Vox Media, which also owns The Verge.)
A YouTube spokesperson said that Mohan was referring to an announcement the company made in April. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote at the time that she takes it “very seriously when creators share stories of experiencing harassment on the platform” and that YouTube would “do more to discourage this from happening.” Wojcicki mentioned similar plans again last month at the Code Conference, saying it was “next on our list.”
After Maza tweeted about Crowder’s behavior in early June, YouTube briefly removed Crowder’s ability to earn ad revenue. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki later apologized to the LGBTQ community after many creators called the company out over its relative lack of action and poor messaging around the situation. Still, Wojcicki stood by the company’s decision not to remove Crowder’s videos or ban him entirely, stating that although YouTube did not agree with his actions and words, his videos didn’t constitute cyberbullying or harassment. The homophobic language, because it was apparently used in jest and as only fractions of longer videos attempting to rebut Maza’s Strikethrough series, didn’t violate YouTube’s policies as far as the company was concerned.
Yet YouTube’s current harassment and cyberbullying policies do state that content posted to deliberately humiliate someone, or content that makes hurtful personal comments about someone else, is in violation of its policies. That’s partially why YouTube saw so much negative feedback in wake of its decision to stand by Crowder, who many argued did violate those guidelines.
“Steven Crowder has a lot of videos, and it took some time for us to look at that and understand it in the context of the video because context really, really matters,” Wojcicki said at Recode’s CodeCon last month. “We looked at a large number of these videos and we decided they were not violative of our harassment policies.”
There is always room for YouTube to improve, Wojcicki said, but argued that she believes the company and the platform have come a long way. Having clear-cut policies that state what “creator-on-creator harassment” looks like could be a way to move those policies forward and set them in stone. It’s what the company has recently done with harmful and hateful content, specifically outlining a branch of content that was once deemed borderline content, and banning it.
This takes "No fun allowed" to a whole new level.
 

MrDegeneratman

The Degenerate Rat
kiwifarms.net

YouTube drafting ‘creator-on-creator harassment’ rules after Steven Crowder incident


YouTube is working on new policies to prevent “creator-on-creator harassment” that it will announce later this year, the company said today. The statement was made by Youtube’s chief product officer, Neal Mohan, who briefly spoke about the issue at YouTube’s VidCon keynote this evening, where both creators and industry insiders were gathered in Anaheim, California.
The news didn’t come with any concrete details about what those policies will actually look like, but YouTube said it considers them to be “just as important to the YouTube community as any product launch.”
“Creator-on-creator harassment” doesn’t have a clear definition, but Mohan’s announcement comes after a series of incidents that fall under the description. In June, conservative pundit Steven Crowder’s use of homophobic language to attack Vox host Carlos Maza spawned a heated controversy about how YouTube should moderate speech on its platform and the extent to which it punishes popular creators. “The move wasn’t spurred by the incident between Crowder and Maza,” Mohan toldCNET, but it’s a safe assumption that incidents like it would fall under the new policies, as well as more internal community drama that leads to hurtful videos and amasses worldwide attention.
(Disclosure: Vox is a publication of Vox Media, which also owns The Verge.)
A YouTube spokesperson said that Mohan was referring to an announcement the company made in April. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki wrote at the time that she takes it “very seriously when creators share stories of experiencing harassment on the platform” and that YouTube would “do more to discourage this from happening.” Wojcicki mentioned similar plans again last month at the Code Conference, saying it was “next on our list.”
After Maza tweeted about Crowder’s behavior in early June, YouTube briefly removed Crowder’s ability to earn ad revenue. YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki later apologized to the LGBTQ community after many creators called the company out over its relative lack of action and poor messaging around the situation. Still, Wojcicki stood by the company’s decision not to remove Crowder’s videos or ban him entirely, stating that although YouTube did not agree with his actions and words, his videos didn’t constitute cyberbullying or harassment. The homophobic language, because it was apparently used in jest and as only fractions of longer videos attempting to rebut Maza’s Strikethrough series, didn’t violate YouTube’s policies as far as the company was concerned.
Yet YouTube’s current harassment and cyberbullying policies do state that content posted to deliberately humiliate someone, or content that makes hurtful personal comments about someone else, is in violation of its policies. That’s partially why YouTube saw so much negative feedback in wake of its decision to stand by Crowder, who many argued did violate those guidelines.
“Steven Crowder has a lot of videos, and it took some time for us to look at that and understand it in the context of the video because context really, really matters,” Wojcicki said at Recode’s CodeCon last month. “We looked at a large number of these videos and we decided they were not violative of our harassment policies.”
There is always room for YouTube to improve, Wojcicki said, but argued that she believes the company and the platform have come a long way. Having clear-cut policies that state what “creator-on-creator harassment” looks like could be a way to move those policies forward and set them in stone. It’s what the company has recently done with harmful and hateful content, specifically outlining a branch of content that was once deemed borderline content, and banning it.
This takes "No fun allowed." to a )whole new level.
(oops double posted by accident)
 

5t3n0g0ph3r

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Thank a lot, Maza! You prick!
"He hurt MUH FEE-FEES!"
YouTube's response should have been "Too bad."
What a bunch of cucks!
 
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