Chella Isabel Marie Coleman / Marcell Coleman / chellacoleman / YGSLRHSTFUT - Muk in human form, has grifted $36k for being a "disabled poor fat blaq trans woman", cutter, lives in squalor, in a terrible tranny punk band

Hamplanet Fitness

Thanks for the TRIGGERS you SHITS
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(s/a) (Twitter video of the band's introduction)

Antifa's army of limp-wristed soyboys is in need of tanks. That's where Los Angeles troon Chella Isabel Marie Coleman comes in. Born Marcell Coleman, the bulbous behemoth is frequently seen blocking all sorts of roads and paths, yelling at the top of his lungs about all the usual woke grievances. What sets Coleman apart from most other troons, aside from his weight, is that he's actually successful at e-begging in addition to being an insufferable nuisance. To date, he's grifted approximately $36,000 despite producing nothing of value. Coleman tends to avoid internet drama and discourse; his lifestyle, chronic e-begging and unwillingness to reflect on himself are what make him a lolcow.

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...because telling a My 600lb Life contestant-to-be they need to lose weight is grounds for physical violence.
(s/a)

YGSLRHSTFUT

You Guys Suck Like Real Hard Shut The Fuck Up Thanks, or YGSLRHSTFUT, is Coleman's trans punk band. He "sings" and plays bass, always seated because his definition of stage presence is "taking up the entire stage." They frequently appear and perform at Antifa events, helping block paths and generally keep people away from areas with their cacophony.

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(s/a)

All members of the band are trans-identified. Their lyrical themes include all ~41 years of trans history and burning the flag. Here's one of their songs, "Let It Burn"



Oh, say, can you see
My ancestors were in slavery
2x

They wanna send the troops
They wanna send the troops
They wanna send the troops
And genocide us
2x

Let it burn, let it burn
2x

Oh, say, can you see
My ancestors were in slavery
Oh, say, can you see
They wanna hang us up and watch us bleed

I wanna burn their flags
I wanna burn their flags
I wanna burn their flags
And watch them die
2x

Let it burn, let it burn
2x

The cop, the cop, the cop is on fire
We don't need no water
Let that motherfucker burn
Burn, motherfucker
Burn, motherfucker
Burn, motherfucker
Burn
2x

Let it burn, let it burn
2x

YGSLRHSTFUT made an appearance at the Wi Spa protests, where Antifa and trans activists clashed with right-wing demonstrators over whether or not troons should be allowed to flash little girls in women's changing rooms. Video of the performance did not have sound and was taken down after right-wing provocateur Andy Ngo retweeted it. A Twitchy article (a) was written about the incident and Twitter users' reactions to it. The protest was later shut down by LAPD. The Post-Millennial also covered the protest (a) and explored Coleman's e-begging history.

Some right-wingers on Twitter compared Coleman's appearance to Grimace from McDonald's. I can kinda see it.

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The band got their name when, after a performance in a studio, someone had heard enough. Per this Yahoo article (a), "“We see this note from one of the neighbors that said, ‘You guys suck like real hard, shut the fuck up, thanks,’ and we were like, ‘That’s our name — let’s turn that into a positive reinforcement,’” Espinosa says."

They should've heeded the note's advice.

E-Begging

In true troon fashion, Coleman loves e-begging. As a "disabled poor fat blaq trans woman", he leverages his identity to guilt woke wypipo into sending him money. So far, he's run two GoFundMe campaigns. Neither has had any real goal, i.e. surgery, medical expenses, etc., just "pay for me to live." Here are the screenshots:

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This one got him over $35k in the end.
(s/a)
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Coleman hasn't elaborated on how he's disabled. He's likely referring to his obesity.
(s/a)

Coleman lives on Skid Row in LA. He used to perform with an acting group for people in rehab and has spoken about rampant drug problems in his area.

Writing

Coleman has written one post on his website, Chella Coleman Consulting (a). It's a rambling piece about how he's discriminated against in literally everything. Of course, his aesthetic and constant whining can't possibly be to blame for people's negative reactions to him; everything is bigotry. This piece was included as part of a Gender & Sexuality Studies curriculum at Ohio State University.

(s/a)
As I pass people wearing my stylish wigs and what’s viewed as “feminine” clothing, I look and feel like a beautiful transgender female. People on the street, however, treat me as anything but. They say I’m a “black pig in a wig”, dismiss me as a “tranny” or “freak of nature.” People assume they know me or who I am, projecting stereotypes and assumptions on to me. They think they know, but they have no idea; people will never know what lies inside.

As I stand in my room getting prepared to face the day, I call on my ancestors, those who fought in the people’s movement to ensure I would one day be free.

As I try to attain some stability, sitting in possible places of employment dressed as the woman I want the world to perceive me to be, I’m ever so mindful of my feelings, knowing how I feel affects how people see me. But when I hear the words:

”We have already filled the position,” or

“I’m sorry, we are not looking for any new people at this time, but we’ll keep your application on file…”

I know something bigger is at play. I see the new hires just a few days later, always assimilated black and brown non-queer folks. This happens to me all the time, and each time I reach into my belly and channel the same resilient energy my people have always had to. This is not to say it doesn’t get me down; it gets me real down. Money makes the world go ‘round, right? I’m not greedy, I just want to live comfortably, not struggling to pay my bills and buy my groceries. I get by, but barely. While the money is a struggle, I continue to empower myself more and more; I dive into the movement more and more.

Becoming the woman I am today – feeling the way do, living the way I have – has pushed away my family, isolating me even further. I’ve been made to feel like I don’t matter, like my family is no longer mine. I will be welcomed again if I revert back to pretending to be cisgender. There are family members who say, “We accept you,” but do they really?

I scramble to stay in the loop of my family, my one remaining tie being a cousin who tells me more about my mom than I ever knew. This hurts me to my core, but I have found a family who wants me; my resilience and love comes from those who are LGBT and queer-identified. This is my chosen family, they have shown me the love and compassion my unchosen birth family lacks.

I have no “love life” or “relationships”; these things are non-existent in my life. I have had my fill of men who don’t identify as queer, men who say, “I’m looking for a relationship,” but it’s obvious to me they’re just looking to get off. Afterwards they forget about me, or they walk ahead of me, acting as if they don’t know me. What can I say? These are the men I choose.

Men come at me spitting rhymes, as if I don’t know what they really want from me. As soon as they find out I am a trans female, the obscenities come.

“I bet you suck a good dick.”

“I don’t want your dick in my ass, but I’ll put my dick in your ass.”

Just thinking of this makes me feel disgusted, as most of the men who say these things to me are brown and black. Like me, they are minorities and define themselves as such, but they fail to realize the fluidity of identity, sexual or otherwise. By treating me this way, they lose out on the gift of connecting, an opportunity to share and receive information and enlightenment. That is a gift from God, Mother Earth, and the universe – those who designed us. It is a missed opportunity for empowerment.

When a person on the street looks at me, confronting me with their assumptions, I break it down for them, explaining I am not going to – and it’s not my job to – conform to their binary. I do not need to be whatever they think a black transgender female should be. I take the time to explain that I channel the spirits of those who fought against enslavement, colonization, and racial and gender biases.

“I am a strong African American who knows my history. I know where my ancestors came from and I know the struggle of my people,” I tell them. I look at these people who approach me on the streets, these people who think they know my life, who assume so much about me, I look them in the eyes and say, “I’m sorry you don’t.”

In these moments, as I stand there facing strangers, I become more aware of the ways in which I’ve struggled and remained in chains, the same chains that have always separated my people from freedom. I have passed through and found my inner strength. I say to these strangers on the street, “The ancestors would be proud of me. Would they be proud of you?

Sincerely, I do not say any of this as a way of belittling or passing judgment; I say these things to educate, to remind them of the ways our people have struggled in order for us to remain strong and free. I want to remind them that perpetuating ignorance keeps them – keeps all of us – in chains. You will never be free if you hold others down.

I believed the lies about myself for far too long, and some of them I still believe. They are lies that have been told to me by a wounded society, and they have resulted in a wounded Chella. I am my own worst enemy, just as I am my own best friend. I select what I chose to believe about myself. I am a powerful, warm-hearted person. I am a beast, freak of nature, not deserving of love. I am a warrior, just like my ancestors who fought for me. I am also weak, not knowing where I fit in life. I believe all of these contradictions. This is how I feel and identify now, but as I walk with others, sit with others, talk with others, it can all change. Who I will be and how I will feel in the future remains unknown. I figure myself out day-by-day. I breathe and release.

I often wonder: had the stars and planets been formed differently, could I have been you and you have been me? I believe in this possibility, so to all of these people I encounter – these employers, these men, these strangers on the street – I say: rise with me. Take your sword out of me and instead, fight the good fight with me. Together let’s remember our transcestors and ancestors.

As I walk these streets, I breathe and release.

Facebook

Looking at Coleman's Facebook posts paints the picture of a lonely, depressed alcoholic desperate for male attention, with a bone to pick with literally everyone. He routinely posts "who's awake?" at 3am, frequently posts about drinking (thanks GoFundMe donors!), and complains about white people.

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Here he tells someone not to use the word "lame" because it's ableist:
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He's having more mobility issues of late:
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(s/a)

Links

Website (a) - misspelled his own name!
Facebook (a)
Instagram (a)
Band Instagram (a)
Bandcamp
TeAda Performing Arts Fellowship (a)
 
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Compulsory Games

Betrayed, devastated, ABORTIONED
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Nov 11, 2020
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Anyone? ANYONE??!!

Everything about this person depresses me. He seems to have a lot of "allies" but no actual friends. Imagine begging facebook strangers to help you get into your walker after a long night of binge drinking and stewing over the previous day's microagressions.

“I bet you suck a good dick.”

“I don’t want your dick in my ass, but I’ll put my dick in your ass.”
Why would you ever publish these words on a website for your consulting business?!
 

Oliveoil

👑 Irate Vassal 👑
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Aug 5, 2019

Clip of our person I found.
 

Ted Kaczynski

Baby's first surrogate activity
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Feb 17, 2021
I always wondered who this far whore was. Seems funny.
 

Chihiro

*wheeze*
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Joined
May 11, 2019
The FB post where he writes "To Hell with you and all your friends" after the post claiming hes so scared of white people really sticks out to me.
Reason being it's a song lyric from a song called "A Decade Under the Influence" by a band called Taking Back Sunday. A VERY white band, that mostly white people listen to. Idk man, it just stuck out to me.
 

Akashic Retard

See details below
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Joined
Mar 19, 2021

Naturally, I wanted to hear what the music sounded like. My observations: they open with a cover of Killing in the Name (of course), which is usually a fun song especially when performed live, but they manage to turn it into a low energy slog that is both boring and irritating. The beast is doing vocals on this one for some reason. The rendition has no energy or passion, possibly because they are playing with just vocals bass and drums. No guitar?

Second song is an original, and for this song the bass has been placed on the gut shelf of the beast to be played like a steel pedal, I assume that it's arms and strap aren't long enough to play it were it to try to hold it the normal way. The other one sings, and is a marginally better singer than the beast. Clearly trying to emulate the bikini kill riot grrrl thing, but going really heavy on the atonal wailing.

I could not get past this song because this shit is bad even for punk standards. I can't imagine anyone listening to this and enjoying it that isn't high on social justice or general troonery.
 

Hamplanet Fitness

Thanks for the TRIGGERS you SHITS
True & Honest Fan
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Jan 26, 2018
He performed with a skid row rehab drama group, not sure what he was in rehab for

This interview is from a few years ago and holy word salad

X: What are some of the healing process y’all practice to cope?

Chella: One of the things I’ve been doing to self-care is number one keeping myself grounded, remembering that I could be next. I started the #I mightbenext or #Icouldbenext. Just connecting my community together to trans folks that I work with and recently I got a job working with a another group that are not trans people at all but also including the voices of trans people in that. I’ve also just reached out to other trans womyn of color that are dealing with the same things, like dealing with not just losing someone in our community but also losing a friend. I find writing really good and helpful. Listening to music as I go to sleep, put some Beyoncé on, some Rihanna on. Heck today I was listening to Deborah Cox. Ok?! so doing a bunch of things, watching TV and disengaging myself from the world, turning off my phone. Not to say that I don’t care at those moments but as Audre Lorde says self-care is an act of revolution. I can’t be doing something for the world if I’m not taken care of. As well as picking one or two people I can bare all to, having really good friends.

X: Do you think all womyn are under attack or is it femininity in general that is under attack?

CHELLA: I also think of capitalism and patriarchy,. Anyone that is not a cis-gendered straight white persyn is a threat to misogyny, a threat to patriarchy, a threat to capitalism. Anyone that dares to be GNC which is completely welcomed in other cultures pre-colonization. One week after there was a transwomyn of color killed, there was a black ciswomyn killed just for not responding to a black man. Thinking of the interconnectedness of those two struggles. As well as, even in South Africa, they have corrective rape, y’all they have corrective rape for lesbians. If you are a self-identified lesbian, and you get raped, and you go to a cop and say I was raped because I was a lesbian. Guess what they are going to tell you? You deserve it. You deserve it. You need to bend to what we want in this post colonial which is still colonization now world.

X: What are some of the projects and work you’ve all been doing around your specific struggles: being black, being a womyn, being in poverty? What are some of the projects and certain things you’ve been doing recently around that?

CHELLA: Last year I went to this conference called the gift conference, fundraising for non profits. We were the first transwomyn convening there, there was a murder two days before we got there. And Ashley Laurence Hunter who is another one of my sheroes, omigosh she is amazing, she was like just don’t come to our memorial and give us a pat on the back. Support our work, support the mission, support these girls that have to think about how they’re going to pay their cell phone bill, how they are going to do stuff to continue to do the work. Unfortunately we live in a capitalist society where we are dependent upon money. We have to reach out to those people. I am also doing a lot of work with Black Lives Matter LA, Los Angeles Community Action Network which they do a lot of housing and homeless rights for people of skid row dtla. I am bringing that voice of a transwomyn in that space and also working within the Trans Lives Matter movement, and bringing that experience of a black persyn in that space. Actually me and some folx got together last weekend and challenged the cis homosexual patriarchy that’s going on at West Hollywood which is considered to be the lgbt mecca. We took over the streets and we stood outside chanting about these womyn whose lives were lost, we didn’t just chant “trans lives matter” we actually read the names and the lives, how they died, who they were, where were they from, and what race they were. Then the manager of the Abbey, which is this prestigious LGBT club, came out and was like “what are you doing this for? I support the transgender movement.” And I was like “look are you aware that we’ve lost 8 transwomyn, and six of those were transwomyn of color?” He was like “no I didn’t, but I do so much for the lgbt, I do so much for the trans movement.” And I was like “how many people do you have on staff? How many trans people do you have on staff?”

CECE: exactly and how many of them are people of color, specifically transwomyn of color?

CHELLA: and he said one. One out of fifty. So I was like what. Give me your card, if you’re so transfriendly, give me your card, and I’ll give your number to a transfriendly support organization and he gave me his card. I do a lot of that kind of work, I do a lot of writing, I do a lot of advocating, on the ground, talking to folks that it’s really hard to talk to about the transmovement. Just Friday I had a conversation with folks that could practically be our uncles and aunts as black people who are still in their faith. Not dissing anyone’s faith, but I do want to acknowledge it was a very hard conversation but guess what? I thought of Cece, I told your story, sister. I was also telling other people other stories I know. So thinking of educating folks, of being on the ground, doing the work of having conversations, even with my neighbors who don’t have access to all the gender and racial justice work I do. Having conversations with them, cos they are the most impacted y’all.

X: What do you think transwomyn of color particularly black womyn would need to craft their own representations? And how do we not feed into our own exploitation and commodificiation of our trans identities?

CHELLA: I do a lot of selfies, videos, and write whenever I go to a protest or a rally or a march. I do a ustream updates. I’m like “hey y’all this is chella, I’m keeping it real”, I use hashtags, cos everything is a hashtag right now. I get my word out, I get my story out there because who is going to tell my story better than me? I have all these intersectionalities I live with. I’m a fat womyn, I’m a fat black transwomyn that lives in skid row. So someone like Laverne cox is not gonna play me. That’s not gonna happen. Though I do love her, I love her pieces, damn she’s amazing. She’s not gonna do my story the way I would do it. I do a lot of other types of media, like liking other peoples’ videos or pictures, hashtagging them, getting their stories out as well. Cos it’s not just about me, when I’m free we’re all free. Thinking of the interconnectedness of how our stories should be, as well as thinking of really holding in the really deep issues I struggle with. Like depression, or like going home tonight from this amazing interview and seeing my trans-sisters get high on speed, which is real, the reality she’s in. I love her no more or less because of who she is. Thinking of those things, we will be honest about where I’m at, as well as telling my own stories and giving myself my voice, nobody’s gonna take that away from me.

X: I just wanted to get what are some of your experience with anti-blackness both within day to day microaggressions and then institutionally when it comes to the schools you go to, the work that you’re doing? And then do you think being as feminine as you are, how does your femininity inform your experience of anti-black racism?

CHELLA: I was watching TV a few weeks ago this commercial came on that was for dating an asian womyn. And the persyn they had next to her was a white man. There’s a proximity to whiteness. As people of color we all have our different struggles, but they’re still not black. I have a friend who said this, that API community folks are not black, the struggle they deal with is the illusion that they are not oppressed, that they are oppressed because they are not black. When black people are liberated, we are all liberated. As a mixed persyn of color, I am cuban, black, afro latina indigenous. Indigenous queer folks are being pushed out of central america because of being black right? On a different scale thinking of the bleaching or the whitening of Beyonce’s skintone. I love her to pieces. Do not say that I said that I don’t like Beyonce because I do. However to appeal to a whiter audience they have whitened her skin in photoshop. Thinking of the organizing realm, thinking of the social justice realm.. a few weeks ago, a coworker came in and they told me me, you know what Chella, you’re gonna be my slave.. and I was like you need to get your white privilege checked.

X: they were white? Okay… what happened after you harmed them? Haha just kidding

CHELLA: It’s my place of work.. so I was like you know you gotta get your privilege checked. Wow, right? Thinking of other spaces, there’s a group that meets at the lgbt center when the Trayvon Martin situation was going on, we were talking about blackness. There was this one white transmasculine guy that was like why is it that when I say the N-word people give me a horrible look but when black people say Asians are driving bad people give them a look like it’s ok. I’m like no. I don’t know what area you’re from, but skid row specifically is 80 percent black, booboo. You and a black persyn could walk into a store. And guess who would get looked at more? The black persyn. No matter what suit or tie. One more point, I heard this story of a college professor who locked himself out of his apartment and he had climbed into the window to try to get into his own apartment, he was an awesome professor, he was high class, he was bougie, and they still called the cops on him and arrested him because he was … can we guess… because he was black. As well as when we’re thinking of the interconnectedness of 28 hours a black male is harmed by a police vigilante or a security guard, every 32 hours a transwomyn, predominately, a transwomyn of color is murdered. Not just in the US, in Brazil, they are murdering predominately indigenous African transwomyn at a high rate. Think of the anti-blackness, not just in the US context, not just in the media context, it feeds into each other, it feeds into like I said earlier, if you’re not white, cisgendered and straight, you are a threat to capitalism, you are threat to patriarchy, you are a threat to nuclear family. Thank you, this has been Chella keeping it real.

X: I’m at a point where I don’t do the ally thing. What are you all thinking?

CHELLA: Someone told me I don’t prefer the term ally, I prefer the term co-conspirator. I’m like allyship in the olden days, Germany had an allyship with I don’t know.. Austria, right. Now they don’t even like each other. When they’re done with each other, okay fuck you. Allyship is not an identity but when somebody comes up and starts to either take on the same dangers as we would for us, if we are in a trans rally and then someone who’s doing allyship, think as a coconspirator, they would take on the bluntless of what’s going happen to a transperson. Because they know that transpeople are on the bottom of the bottom. So thinking of ways to educate folks who do want to use that term as a way to identify themselves. I hate it cos it’s not on us, it should be on other people who are coconspirators but it’s also part of the movement work that we gotta do sometimes. LA CAN where I work is predominately folks of color, there’s only three white people in an agency of thirty, right. So thinking of the fact that they’re down, well half of them are down, are down to get arrested when black lives, trans lives are under attack.
 

Blood Bath & Beyond

Russian Bot
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Joined
Mar 21, 2019
Never forget that these are the people that most politicians, major corporations, public education and universities look to for policy and moral guidance.

😭:deagleleft:
 
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