China to restrict gaming for minors -

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Marco Fucko

I fantasized about this back in Chicago
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
>everyone saying this is a bad idea

If I'm being honest I admire a certain element of the Chinese mentality, which is keeping your eye on the ball. So much of western culture is about being "free" to live your life, and yet so many people live unproductive or damaging lives, it begs the question why we let that happen. Kids in China need to be studying, that shit has to be competitive as hell given the single party system and raw population.

If they actually enforce this, then this is a terrible idea.
Restricting the amount of bread and circus will only cause Chinese Gamers to become more aware of their real life conditions, which could easily backfire on the Chinese in the long run.

Modernity is the biggest circus, homie. Vidya is one microscopic element of the equation. Movies, consumer goods, work. All of this will fill their time over vidya. Also, collective punishment is a powerful deterrent, if we're bringing the social credit system into it.
 

Judge Holden

TRVE BVCK BREAKER
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Worth remembering now that china's leadership is decidedly not made up of machievellian bond villains who have mastered manipulation and orwellian control as a science, but a mob of cretinous, bigoted*, and hilariously petty old boomers so wretchedly out of touch they make Hillary Clinton look like the revolutionary Voice of the People, who view all their surveillance assets and their copypasted tech stolen from the west as little more than blunt tools to beat their hick populace into compliance.

This also means that their ideas of "social norms" and "decency" are more stuffy, uptight, and repressed than a mid 90s southern baptist symposium on the evils of devil-rock music and arcade games, but when combined with their heavy handed yet inevitably inept and inconsistent attempts to lay down the law, will breed a heck of a lot of resentment towards them from chink zoomers who would otherwise not give a shit.

Alas, this is unlikely to produce the gamer rising of legend, but will probably be yet another pebble in the ever growing basket of "shit thats going to rot away at the state's capacity to cow its people and function as an authoritarian dictatorship" that will inevitably drag the whole system down as years go by, no matter how much nationalist masturbation the gubmint shits out to turn their bitterness elsewhere

*in the most proper sense of the word being extremely suspicious and distrusting of any perspective that does not match their own extremely narrow mindset
 

HeyYou

YOU BETTER RUN!
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
>everyone saying this is a bad idea

If I'm being honest I admire a certain element of the Chinese mentality, which is keeping your eye on the ball. So much of western culture is about being "free" to live your life, and yet so many people live unproductive or damaging lives, it begs the question why we let that happen. Kids in China need to be studying, that shit has to be competitive as hell given the single party system and raw population.

Modernity is the biggest circus, homie. Vidya is one microscopic element of the equation. Movies, consumer goods, work. All of this will fill their time over vidya. Also, collective punishment is a powerful deterrent, if we're bringing the social credit system into it.
I'm not a statist, so fuck that. Be cool with this, and see afterwards how far countries are willing to go in regards to other things, like implementing a system where you need to ID yourself to watch porn. Give no inch.
 

ZeCommissar

This paper contains all the reasons you're a fag
kiwifarms.net
How do they plan on enforcing this? Are you going to raid billys Changs house because the ISP reported that a household used the internet all night long?
 

Homersexual

kiwifarms.net
Good start. Brazilians next and Russians after them.

brfw0[1].png
 

Token Weeaboo

It's okay to cry
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
China's government is acting as the parent on behalf of the actual parents of China. Kids shouldn't really be stuck in front of a screen all the time, that's for sure. I don't think the Government should be enforcing this- then the next question is does everyone have some sort of login? will the kid playing overtime affect their social credit score? Even then, how will they know it's a young child?

I don't know how they will implement this, but I bet China will find a way.
 

ToroidalBoat

Token Hispanic Friend
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
“Life sucks so kids are escaping into vidya. Should we address what’s making life suck? Nah let’s just restrict vidya lol.” - CPC

Reminds me of when FOXCONN just installed netting to prevent factory workers from offing themselves rather than improve working conditions, from what I heard.
 
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bot_for_hire

kiwifarms.net

China to ban online gaming, chatting with foreigners outside Great Firewall: report

Say goodbye to your guildmates in China, as CCP extends its political censorship to online gaming world​

After blocking a popular Nintendo game "Animal Crossing," the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is taking its political censorship to the extreme by disconnecting Chinese online gamers from their guildmates outside China.

On April 10, China banned the popular social simulation video game in which gamers can create a home and interact with cute animal villagers, owing to Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) revealing a customized scene in the game which reads "Free Hong Kong" and mocks Chinese leader Xi Jinping. Several other players were also found leveraging the game to vent their discontent with the CCP and making satirical content related to the CCP's failure to tackle the virus.

The communist regime is said to have noticed an authority vacuum in online multiplayer games, which enables people to freely socialize without monitoring. Local metropolises are scrambling to draft laws to expand the scope of online censorship in video games and even prohibit gamers from meeting and chatting with people on the other side of the Great Firewall, according to a Chinese gaming forum 游戏葡萄.
One-player online games will also be subject to surveillance, as a new real-name mechanism is going to be implemented in China. Also, the new law will not allow for zombies and plagues, map editing, roleplaying, as well as organizing a union in games — regulations which are believed to be inspired by the sensitive content made by Joshua Wong.

As the CCP's audacious global propaganda campaign to silence critics abroad and to defend its infallibility fails to work out, the new law is expected to block Chinese people from learning how the world is reacting to Beijing's handling of the outbreak and subsequent cover-ups.

Other rules under the new law are less political, according to the forum. They include an online gaming curfew (10 p.m. to 8 a.m.) for gamers aged under 18 and a maximum amount of money they are allowed to spend on games to combat internet addiction.
 

Slimy Time

Long and lanky.
kiwifarms.net

China to ban online gaming, chatting with foreigners outside Great Firewall: report

Say goodbye to your guildmates in China, as CCP extends its political censorship to online gaming world​

After blocking a popular Nintendo game "Animal Crossing," the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is taking its political censorship to the extreme by disconnecting Chinese online gamers from their guildmates outside China.

On April 10, China banned the popular social simulation video game in which gamers can create a home and interact with cute animal villagers, owing to Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) revealing a customized scene in the game which reads "Free Hong Kong" and mocks Chinese leader Xi Jinping. Several other players were also found leveraging the game to vent their discontent with the CCP and making satirical content related to the CCP's failure to tackle the virus.

The communist regime is said to have noticed an authority vacuum in online multiplayer games, which enables people to freely socialize without monitoring. Local metropolises are scrambling to draft laws to expand the scope of online censorship in video games and even prohibit gamers from meeting and chatting with people on the other side of the Great Firewall, according to a Chinese gaming forum 游戏葡萄.
One-player online games will also be subject to surveillance, as a new real-name mechanism is going to be implemented in China. Also, the new law will not allow for zombies and plagues, map editing, roleplaying, as well as organizing a union in games — regulations which are believed to be inspired by the sensitive content made by Joshua Wong.

As the CCP's audacious global propaganda campaign to silence critics abroad and to defend its infallibility fails to work out, the new law is expected to block Chinese people from learning how the world is reacting to Beijing's handling of the outbreak and subsequent cover-ups.

Other rules under the new law are less political, according to the forum. They include an online gaming curfew (10 p.m. to 8 a.m.) for gamers aged under 18 and a maximum amount of money they are allowed to spend on games to combat internet addiction.
Outside contact with the hive is forbidden. Enough playing your games new spawn, you need to work hard to be a productive member of the hive.
 

Kane Lives

Peace through power
kiwifarms.net

China to ban online gaming, chatting with foreigners outside Great Firewall: report

Say goodbye to your guildmates in China, as CCP extends its political censorship to online gaming world​

After blocking a popular Nintendo game "Animal Crossing," the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is taking its political censorship to the extreme by disconnecting Chinese online gamers from their guildmates outside China.

On April 10, China banned the popular social simulation video game in which gamers can create a home and interact with cute animal villagers, owing to Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) revealing a customized scene in the game which reads "Free Hong Kong" and mocks Chinese leader Xi Jinping. Several other players were also found leveraging the game to vent their discontent with the CCP and making satirical content related to the CCP's failure to tackle the virus.

The communist regime is said to have noticed an authority vacuum in online multiplayer games, which enables people to freely socialize without monitoring. Local metropolises are scrambling to draft laws to expand the scope of online censorship in video games and even prohibit gamers from meeting and chatting with people on the other side of the Great Firewall, according to a Chinese gaming forum 游戏葡萄.
One-player online games will also be subject to surveillance, as a new real-name mechanism is going to be implemented in China. Also, the new law will not allow for zombies and plagues, map editing, roleplaying, as well as organizing a union in games — regulations which are believed to be inspired by the sensitive content made by Joshua Wong.

As the CCP's audacious global propaganda campaign to silence critics abroad and to defend its infallibility fails to work out, the new law is expected to block Chinese people from learning how the world is reacting to Beijing's handling of the outbreak and subsequent cover-ups.

Other rules under the new law are less political, according to the forum. They include an online gaming curfew (10 p.m. to 8 a.m.) for gamers aged under 18 and a maximum amount of money they are allowed to spend on games to combat internet addiction.
Good riddance. No one likes playing with mainlanders anyway.

Maybe I'd finally not be paired up with Chinese players and their shitty connections in Warframe.
 
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