Chinese Communist Party Megathread - Cold War 2: Electric Boogaloo

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teriyakiburns

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I can't believe people still don't get the MO. Xi's going to just use debt traps and business backlisting (such as cutting off NBA games in CHina because Daryl Morey retweeted something in support of Hong Kong protestors) to get his way. If he ever uses the army, it'll be really too late because the country would have been put in a point where all they can do is roll out the welcome mat. And that is how a loan shark plans to take over the world.
Debt traps aren't relevant to the sort of territorial disputes I'm talking about. Yes, that's how China can establish African colonies and guarantee itself raw material supplies, but when it comes to places like India, or its belligerence in the south china sea, the whole "take our loan and then we take your airport" strategy isn't remotely viable, simply because there are already established hostilities. China won't debt-trap Japan or Taiwan, or any of its immediate neighbours with outstanding territorial disputes, because they would place territorial demands on China that it can't tolerate before accepting any such deal. Nor can they blacklist the entire world, no matter what Xi (or anyone who thinks he's some unstoppable galaxybrain) may believe.

China's demographic time-bomb is exploding right now. They have an huge excess of single men, with less and less to occupy their time. Young men with few distractions and no girlfriend tend to get belligerent; they tend to want to solve their problem by overthrowing and killing the people in charge, who they invariably blame for their problems. Any history nerd will tell you that situation is traditionally resolved one of two ways: productive distraction, or harness their anger to the military and direct it outward. In Europe, the traditional distraction was the monastic system, which absorbed most of the surplus male population and gave them some level meaning in their lives. In the modern era, the distraction is mass media consumption and welfare. China doesn't have much of its monastic tradition left, while Xi's recent reforms have begun striping away the distraction of mass media, which means that its young men will have even more undistracted time on their hands.

China also has a long and storied history of sending surplus men to die fighting in pointless wars. They are expendable. Chinese culture places little value on the life of the peasants, no matter how it might dress itself up for the modern era.

The question of whether China is going to engage in war to keep its population in line is already decided by its demography and culture. The only question left is where and when.
 

Rezza

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Their Military honestly wants nothing to do with Taiwan. While Cinese Naval power has risen they are not really there yet where they can wage an invasion of a fully industrialized well armed first world nation, across water. People tend to not realize just how difficult amphibious warfare is. Even the Russians at the height of Soviet Power would find an amphibious invasion tough going. China's military is built for land warfare and control of Litoral Waters around the South China Sea.

I think when the shooting starts it will be in a different direction. Possibly towards India. Assuming it doesn't begin with China rolling tanks over its own citizens again.
Don't forget as well modern Chinese Armed Forces have no experience at all fighting in any conflict, not even against technologically inferior forces like US and Russia did. This is something people often forget about, they're military is essentially inexperienced. Hell, they have way more experience dealing with dissidents than actual combat. This is the country that spend more for state surveillance than their military, after all
 

Mukhrani

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Their Military honestly wants nothing to do with Taiwan. While Cinese Naval power has risen they are not really there yet where they can wage an invasion of a fully industrialized well armed first world nation, across water. People tend to not realize just how difficult amphibious warfare is. Even the Russians at the height of Soviet Power would find an amphibious invasion tough going. China's military is built for land warfare and control of Litoral Waters around the South China Sea.

I think when the shooting starts it will be in a different direction. Possibly towards India. Assuming it doesn't begin with China rolling tanks over its own citizens again.
I think they would go for Quemoy or the Matsu Islands first, especially the former. Quemoy is ROC territory that is only six miles offshore from mainland China. Taking it would be incredibly easy for mainland forces, and would be a symbolic victory. The Matsu Islands are also pretty close, especially the larger ones like Nangan. No sane ally of Taiwan would go to war to defend Quemoy; it would fold almost instantly and taking it back would necessitate engaging the PRC on their own territory. The big prize would be the Pescadores, which would give them a point to stage attacks on the main island. If they split these engagements up in waves they would draw that nationalist fervor out and take back the smaller islands piece by piece, sending out their military to harass the next target. I think that the definitive battle would probably be fought on the Pescadores; historically the main island can't hold out long once they've lost the islands, as a larger enemy can use them as a base to harass supply lines and any forces on the main island. The good thing (for the Chinese) about these salami tactics is that it's hard for the alliance defending Taiwan to draw a line in the sand and gather a coalition. Drawing the line at Quemoy would be insane and suicidal, drawing it at the Matsu Islands would be sub-optimal, but once you decide to draw the line at the Pescadores you've already failed the Taiwanese twice and undermined your own claims about their inviolable territorial sovereignty. I think that if the Chinese go to war this is what they're going to do, and they'll couple it with domestic political pressure within the ROC to fold peacefully, convincing them that the West cannot be relied upon to keep their promises to defend Taiwan and offering them a tempting deal.
 
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IAmNotAlpharius

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Debt traps aren't relevant to the sort of territorial disputes I'm talking about. Yes, that's how China can establish African colonies and guarantee itself raw material supplies, but when it comes to places like India, or its belligerence in the south china sea, the whole "take our loan and then we take your airport" strategy isn't remotely viable, simply because there are already established hostilities. China won't debt-trap Japan or Taiwan, or any of its immediate neighbours with outstanding territorial disputes, because they would place territorial demands on China that it can't tolerate before accepting any such deal. Nor can they blacklist the entire world, no matter what Xi (or anyone who thinks he's some unstoppable galaxybrain) may believe.

China's demographic time-bomb is exploding right now. They have an huge excess of single men, with less and less to occupy their time. Young men with few distractions and no girlfriend tend to get belligerent; they tend to want to solve their problem by overthrowing and killing the people in charge, who they invariably blame for their problems. Any history nerd will tell you that situation is traditionally resolved one of two ways: productive distraction, or harness their anger to the military and direct it outward. In Europe, the traditional distraction was the monastic system, which absorbed most of the surplus male population and gave them some level meaning in their lives. In the modern era, the distraction is mass media consumption and welfare. China doesn't have much of its monastic tradition left, while Xi's recent reforms have begun striping away the distraction of mass media, which means that its young men will have even more undistracted time on their hands.

China also has a long and storied history of sending surplus men to die fighting in pointless wars. They are expendable. Chinese culture places little value on the life of the peasants, no matter how it might dress itself up for the modern era.

The question of whether China is going to engage in war to keep its population in line is already decided by its demography and culture. The only question left is where and when.
They really chose the worst of both worlds. It’s fine to shrink your populace if you’re ok with focusing on quality over quantity. This isn’t the 1930s when their fertility rate was 5.5. Every boy that’s lost is the culmination of 6 people’s life work and investment. Just like that their hope for retirement is gone. If they’re an incel it was doomed anyways but they still had some hope that maybe just maybe he’ll get a decent job or at least he’ll be there to render aid.
Their Military honestly wants nothing to do with Taiwan. While Cinese Naval power has risen they are not really there yet where they can wage an invasion of a fully industrialized well armed first world nation, across water. People tend to not realize just how difficult amphibious warfare is. Even the Russians at the height of Soviet Power would find an amphibious invasion tough going. China's military is built for land warfare and control of Litoral Waters around the South China Sea.

I think when the shooting starts it will be in a different direction. Possibly towards India. Assuming it doesn't begin with China rolling tanks over its own citizens again.
I think they want Taiwan because they’re that full of themselves and Taiwan represents what could’ve been. They won’t be able to stand for a symbol like that to remain. Every minute that Taiwan exists it proves what their country could’ve been like. More importantly I believe they lack the self awareness regarding the difficulty of taking let alone seizing Taiwan. I also believe they’re making the same mistakes as Imperial Japan.

I believe they will attempt to take Taiwan because 1.) It’s their smaller neighbor, especially compared to India. 2.) Taiwan’s wealth bugs them. 3.) They’re going to strip mine Hong Kong of all its assets to stem their economic bleeding and when that well is dry they’ll look elsewhere.

Their desire for Taiwan is why they’re intent on studying the Falkland Islands. They believe it’s similar and they’re not wrong. It was started because the Argentines were trying to focus their problems outward than to admit fault in misgovernance and to claim nearby territory they saw as their own. However, as you listed there are several major problems with China and it’s navy. Due to corruption, their need to maintain face, and more importantly the danger of speaking against the party line, they are at least partially blind to their own shortcomings to waging a war against Taiwan.

I also feel like their focus on the Falklands Islands is telling in and of itself. Namely they believe that the true threat would be a US force coming to liberate the island. I suspect that they believe they can easily take and hold the island and are focusing most of their planning efforts on stopping the US rather than taking and holding Taiwan.

However, they are looking at the wrong war. The Falklands were barely inhabited with about ~3k while Taiwan has a population of 23.57 million. Likewise, the English garrison there was not expecting an attack until it was too late. With Taiwan there is a major population center which can offer resistance and the island itself is dedicated and prepared to fight a defensive war specifically against China. Whereas China has to be prepared for hypothetical wars against any number of their neighbors. I also suspect that their military is rife with corruption and that much of their equipment is shittly built. The locals are also highly motivated not to be invaded and there’s millions of them. Another major difference is the size too. The island of Taiwan is also 13,796 mi^2 whereas the Falkland are 4,700mi^2 over multiple islands. They’re focusing on a later part of the conflict that may not even be relevant per say.

Another major issue is that invading Taiwan will likely elicit a response and the countries they’re most likely to fight are also their top trading partners for energy and food. Good luck making anything without enough energy or eating anything. Not that they care if the peasants starve but soldiers need goods which are produced by energy and can’t fight on an empty stomach. Hungry people are also angry people and it can quickly escalate with a country the size of China. Simply not trading with them will hurt them significantly. I also would not doubt that the US would do everything it could go hurt their civilian merchant fleet, and it can. Their navy isn’t capable of protecting Chinese vessels which could be seized or sunk en masse by the US and it’s allies. So good luck with colonizing Africa if you can’t even ship troops and people there or raw materials back.

I also suspect that they do not want war with India and are not adequately prepared for it. They dismiss any purchase from western powers or treaties with any of the 5 eyes alliance as meaningless or superficial. In part they are symbolic but they also have a lot of interests that align. Basically they’re avoiding an uncomfortable subject and rather than preparing for it properly like the Prussians autists once did and American autists still do, they’re making assumptions and hoping for the best.

The thing though is that India has always tried to balance their relationship between Russia and the US, so it’s not anything new. My theory is that their party line is that India isn’t a threat and that they aren’t really interested in expanding their influence to the East and that they can check their northern influence. I believe they are living in the past and assuming because they beat India before they can do it again. This time though India has more and better troops. More importantly they have more troops capable of fighting at higher elevations and can absorb casualties better than China.

I also feel that they do not understand how ambitious Indian nationalists truly are. Like if you follow Indian nationalists they’re very gunho about spreading their influence and being number one. A lot of them also hate China since it’s a neighbor and often seen as an impediment to their progress.

A lot of Americans are also tired of playing world police, so the timing of India’s accendence works well. So there’s a natural gap to fill. Furthermore, 71% of the US population view India favorably, so they’re more willing to make room or to give up space to India than say China or Russia.

More importantly it makes sense for India to make inroads with other former English colonies like Australia, New Zealand, and the US. They have a common enemy, in this case China, speak a shared language, and they were once a part of a larger nation state, so there’s shared politics, philosophies, cultural crossover, and there’s historical trading. From an Indian nationalist point of view they can tap into the old English Imperial network, reclaim their position as the crown jewel of the anglophone world, but this time as a leading nation rather than a colony. This is made easier by the more positive views in the anglophone world holds towards India, especially compared to China

Lastly the CCP much like Imperial Japan struggles with planning for less ideal scenarios, like getting hit, and what they will do. If China isn’t careful what could start simply as an attempt to take Taiwan could quickly escalate into a larger conflict that they haven’t planned for. Not just with the US, Japan, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the UK but with India. The absolute worse case scenario would be if their northern neighbor saw the way the wind was blowing and decided they need more ports. I don’t think it’d play out that way but I don’t think they’re ready for all the weird convulsions and turns a war can take.

Edit: India expanding its trade to Taiwan imo makes sense for India’s interests, as does increasing their trade with the Pacific and Americas.

2nd edit: I think a compromise with Taiwan was much more likely before they reneged their deals with Hong Kong. There is no assurance that they won’t just rip up the treaty and loot the island once it’s surrendered to them. I’ve known many Taiwanese and most of them consider any struggle with China to be an existential one, recent events have only made that more clear. They have a lot of reasons to not surrender.
3rd edit I think the CCP can be effective so long as it’s part of the plan and the plan is going well, but will struggle once it starts derailing.

TLDR China is up its own ass and overestimates its ability to take over Taiwan, underestimates India’s capabilities and ambitions, and is extremely butt hurt by Taiwan.
 
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Random Internet Person

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they'll couple it with domestic political pressure within the ROC to fold peacefully, convincing them that the West cannot be relied upon to keep their promises to defend Taiwan and offering them a tempting deal.
Isn't that what China is already doing to Taiwan and Hong Kong since Afghanistan fell to the Taliban.
I think they would go for Quemoy or the Matsu Islands first, especially the former. Quemoy is ROC territory that is only six miles offshore from mainland China. Taking it would be incredibly easy for mainland forces, and would be a symbolic victory. The Matsu Islands are also pretty close, especially the larger ones like Nangan. No sane ally of Taiwan would go to war to defend Quemoy; it would fold almost instantly and taking it back would necessitate engaging the PRC on their own territory. The big prize would be the Pescadores, which would give them a point to stage attacks on the main island. If they split these engagements up in waves they would draw that nationalist fervor out and take back the smaller islands piece by piece, sending out their military to harass the next target. I think that the definitive battle would probably be fought on the Pescadores; historically the main island can't hold out long once they've lost the islands, as a larger enemy can use them as a base to harass supply lines and any forces on the main island. The good thing (for the Chinese) about these salami tactics is that it's hard for the alliance defending Taiwan to draw a line in the sand and gather a coalition. Drawing the line at Quemoy would be insane and suicidal, drawing it at the Matsu Islands would be sub-optimal, but once you decide to draw the line at the Pescadores you've already failed the Taiwanese twice and undermined your own claims about their inviolable territorial sovereignty. I think that if the Chinese go to war this is what they're going to do, and they'll couple it with domestic political pressure within the ROC to fold peacefully, convincing them that the West cannot be relied upon to keep their promises to defend Taiwan and offering them a tempting deal.
Well, that's a plausible strategy. Then the question becomes if generals get greedy and if Xi can hold the leash on his attack dogs.
 

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Except the CCP is making a nation of attack dogs and lackeys. And the CCP more likely to go after Hong Kong and Taiwan to take their shit with a mainland force they're ready to mobilize.
While also starving them, fucking them in the ass economically, and bully them with corrupt cops. Propaganda only goes so far.

After their family members get crushed by bridges/floods, most sane people be like 'holup'.
 

Mukhrani

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Isn't that what China is already doing to Taiwan and Hong Kong since Afghanistan fell to the Taliban.
Yeah, they do it pretty everywhere they want to build influence, laying the groundwork way ahead of time. Then if they hit a roadblock they can ramp up external pressure while mirroring that pressure internally, intending to promote capitulation and avoid wasting resources. When that isn't the case they use international norms to their favor. This would be especially effective in Taiwan due to both proximity and cultural ties.
Well, that's a plausible strategy. Then the question becomes if generals get greedy and if Xi can hold the leash on his attack dogs.
Yeah, the biggest threat to a system like China's is a legitimacy crisis and internal dysfunction. It's been that way for thousands of years and its why they have things like the Great Firewall. Controlling information and molding public opinion is paramount, as is the strict control of party officials.
 

Super-Chevy454

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Slightly off-topic, there a vlog about 2 dams in Brazil who collapsed and was owned by the corporations who did 3GD.

Btw, the guys of American Thinker added more on the table about Chinese military.
December 29, 2021

There are indications that the Chinese military has serious problems​

By Andrea Widburg

Xi Jinping has been doing a great deal of saber rattling of late, threatening both Australia and Taiwan. China has also been building islands in the South China Sea, flying hypersonic weapons, stealing and illegally buying vast amounts of military technology, and overtly working to make its military more manly, even as the U.S. military deals with maternity flight suits and the needs of the so-called transgender troops. Nevertheless, when all is said and done, a military is only as good as the people doing the fighting, and there are indications that China has a problem in this area.
The Epoch Times recently published an article entitled “Corruption Wears Down Chinese Military’s Combat Effectiveness,” a problem that marches hand in hand with a lack of battle experience:
Corruption is a widespread phenomenon in China’s military where officers, including generals, have relied not on their duration of service or military prowess to rise in the ranks but rather bribery and connections.
Experts commented that a lack of competent leaders now threaten to be severely detrimental to China’s warfighting capabilities.
Another problem for the Chinese military is that, as in England of old, members of the upper classes don’t earn their commissions, they buy them:
“A commander from a military district bribed Xu Caihou [then vice chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC)] 20 million yuan ($3.14 million) for a senior position. Xu then promoted this one, rather than another commander who just bribed him 10 million yuan ($1.57 million),” Major General Yang Chunchang said [in 2015].
In the Chinese military, there’s only one general who has real combat experience. Li Zuocheng, 68, served in the Vietnam War in 1979 as the director of a company consisting of about 100 soldiers. Li is the chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the CMC.
Thus, for all the snazzy uniforms and drills we see when the Chinese military puts on a parade in Beijing, it’s possible that the people in charge are just big, rich boys playing with toy soldiers.
234811_5_.jpg

Image: China’s 2019 anniversary parade. YouTube screen grab.
Xi has apparently been trying to clean up the military, according to the article, for he’s fired several high-level officers over the past few years. The same article details myriad instances over the past four years of efforts to purge the military of corrupt officers. That may be impossible, though:
“The Chinese military has become a puddle of mud, without combat effectiveness,” Luo Yu, son of former revolutionary Chinese Gen. Lou Ruiqing, told The Epoch Times on Nov. 14, 2017. “No Chinese official or officer isn’t involved in bribery, it’s a systematic problem.
“There’s no way to stop the corruption in the Chinese military.”
The Epoch Times, which is openly hostile to the Chinese communist regime, is not the only one reporting on this corruption. As far back as 2012, Foreign Policy wrote that “The institution is riddled with corruption and professional decay, compromised by ties of patronage, and asphyxiated by the ever-greater effort required to impose political control.” With Xi having consolidated even more power since then, that asphyxiation must have increased.
Then, in 2018, the Rand Blog pointed out the same problem the Epoch Times article noted, which is that the Chinese military is woefully lacking in combat experience. (Hat tip: Will O’Toole.)
Today, China's military has an increasingly impressive high-tech arsenal, but its ability to use these weapons and equipment remains unclear. There are reasons to be skeptical. The People's Liberation Army (PLA) struggles under the legacy of an obsolete command system, rampant corruption, and training of debatable realism, among other issues. President Xi Jinping, the chairman of the Central Military Commission, has directed major efforts to address each of these defects and improve the military's ability to fight and win wars. Since 2016, these organizational and other reforms have gained momentum.
It’s hard to believe that the chaos of 2020 and 2021 will have improved the military’s corruption and inexperience.
For all that, only a fool would underestimate the risks that the Chinese military prevents to Taiwan, Australia, or others in the free world. For one thing, it’s probably got missile launchers arrayed on cargo ships throughout the world. For another thing, as the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir showed, if you hand enough peasants a gun, even if they’re wearing cotton shoes and jackets in sub-zero temperatures, their sheer mass can wear down a better trained and better equipped military.
Nevertheless, it’s as problematic to overestimate a military’s strength as it is to underestimate it. While the latter can lead to disastrous military defeats, the former can lead to bad, even dangerous, political decisions taken from a sense of military inferiority.
 

Rezza

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A nice little article I found
https://www.theguardian.com/busines...o-mirage-will-chinas-gdp-ever-overtake-the-us
From economic miracle to mirage – will China’s GDP ever overtake the US?
Analysis: issues of governance, rising debt, Covid and property market turmoil will delay Beijing’s quest to become the global economy’s No 1

George Magnus
Tue 28 Dec 2021 15.08 GMT

“The east is rising, the west is declining”, according to the narrative propagated by the Chinese Communist party (CCP). Many outside China take its “inevitable rise” as read. On the way to becoming a “modern socialist country” by 2035, and rich, powerful, and dominant by 2049, the centenary of the People’s Republic, China wants to claim bragging rights as its GDP surpasses the United States, and project its power based on its expanding economic heft.

There is, however, a critical flaw in this narrative. China’s economy may fail to overtake the US as it succumbs to the proverbial middle-income trap. This is where the relative development progress of countries in relation to richer nations stalls, and is normally characterised by difficult economic adjustment and often by unpredictable political consequences.

Historically, China’s growth miracle has been remarkable. In the 30 years to 1990. The money GDP (the market value of goods and services produced in an economy) for China and the US in American dollar terms grew more or less in tandem at just over 6% and 8% per annum, respectively. . But in the next three decades, China’s GDP growth doubled to over 13%, while America’s halved to 4.5%. That pushed China’s GDP up from 5% of American GDP to 66%.

Yet, China’s growth spurt is now over, and the huge disparity in GDP growth has been eliminated. In the last few quarters, China’s GDP has been growing at half the rate of the US. Although that discrepancy is probably unsustainable, America’s $9tn GDP margin over China means that comparable rates of GDP growth in the future will sustain and even widen the margin. A Japanese thinktank has recently extended the date when it expects China to overtake the US, from 2029 to 2033. Deferrals like this are now a feature, and there will be more.

The issue though is less about the maths and more about why China is at a turning point.

Remember we have been here before. In the 1930s, Germany was going to dominate Europe, if not the world. In the 1960s and the 1980s, the Soviet Union – which had already stolen a march on the US in space technology – and later Japan, which was the rising economic force on the planet, would within 10 to 20 years overtake America to become the dominant economic and technological power.

History was not kind to the consensus. There is a serial tendency going back to the 1920s to underestimate the self-rectifying capacity of American institutions and enterprise. Equally, the Soviet Union and Japan both pursued similar development models, based around distortions that emphasised unsustainably and excessively high savings, high investment, and eventually high debt. Their development models cracked with spectacular consequences attributable to chronic failures of institutions and governance.

China is our 21st-century version of this phenomenon. Its investment rate is a good 10 percentage points of GDP higher than it was at the peak in the USSR and Japan, and strongly associated with misallocation and inefficiency of capital, and widespread debt servicing problems.

Its zero-Covid policy could keep barriers in place between China and the world economy until 2023 or even beyond, but this aside, a protracted slowing in trend growth, exacerbated by over-indebtedness and the tipping point now in real estate, as illustrated by the crumbling development giant Evergrande, is already under way. China’s $60tn real estate sector is four times GDP and accounts for a quarter to a third of annual growth. It faces years of awkward adjustment, not least as developers cut debt, the first-time buyer age cohort contracts, and probably as real estate prices decline.

China’s economic structure, moreover, is unbalanced. It has income per head that is the equivalent of Mexico, but consumption per head that is no higher than Peru. Consumer spending accounts for about 37% of GDP, little higher than it was in 2010, and much lower than in 2000. Productivity growth, closely associated with liberalising reform, has stalled.

China’s development model urgently needs a makeover to avoid the middle-income trap. The longer it is delayed, the bigger the costs. China’s leaders recognise that change is necessary, and Xi Jinping recently revived the slogan of “common prosperity” to mobilise the Communist party and citizens around a strategy to reduce income and regional inequality, and improve living standards.

Yet these political goals require precisely the kind of liberalising, progressive and redistributive reforms to the economy to which Xi Jinping is opposed. He has pursued an increasingly ideological and totalitarian governance style in which the already dominant position of the party and state in the economy, has been strengthened further.

Perversely, he has created a contradiction in which even the CCP’s expertise in dialectical argument may be of little help. The recent blizzard of new laws and regulations aimed at private firms and entrepreneurs, for example, is designed to nail down the part’s control and bring the private sector to political heel. This is hardly compatible with the productivity growth and innovation on which China’s lofty economic ambition depends.

Overtaking the United States is going to need a lot more than narrative. It requires policies to which Xi’s China is opposed, and might just remain a mirage. The consequences for China and the rest of the world have not been properly thought about.

  • George Magnus is a research associate at Oxford University’s China Centre and at Soas. He is the author of Red Flags: Why Xi’s China is in Jeopardy.
 

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Their nationalistic propaganda game is also eerily similar with both Imperial Japan and Nazi Germany, using ethno-nationalism with increasingly emphasizing on the racial angle especially for Chinese diaspora abroad
The whole chinese regime is similar to the Nazi Germany/Imperial Japan.

I wonder, if the CCP fails and the attrocities are revealed, how many global agendas will just simply stop existing because they were funded by chicomm money.

Wouldn't be surprised if the whole Global Warming was just Chinese paying politicians to bottleneck worldwide economies so they get a head start.

Or the EU refugee crisis was just fueled by Russian/Chinese money who wanted to sway Ukraine away from EU.

At this point I wouldn't be surprised if the next dem elections will have 30000000 fewer votes because the Chicom money wasn't there to sway some people (dead or alive) to vote. Antifa might just disappear overnight, same for the CRT bullshit, because guess what? Chicom money.
 

Super-Chevy454

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At this point I wouldn't be surprised if the next dem elections will have 30000000 fewer votes because the Chicom money wasn't there to sway some people (dead or alive) to vote. Antifa might just disappear overnight, same for the CRT bullshit, because guess what? Chicom money.
We might add also some pro-China governments in Latin America like Venezuela and Nicaragua. What Maduro will do without his uncle CCP?
 

Random Internet Person

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The whole chinese regime is similar to the Nazi Germany/Imperial Japan.

I wonder, if the CCP fails and the attrocities are revealed, how many global agendas will just simply stop existing because they were funded by chicomm money.

Wouldn't be surprised if the whole Global Warming was just Chinese paying politicians to bottleneck worldwide economies so they get a head start.

Or the EU refugee crisis was just fueled by Russian/Chinese money who wanted to sway Ukraine away from EU.

At this point I wouldn't be surprised if the next dem elections will have 30000000 fewer votes because the Chicom money wasn't there to sway some people (dead or alive) to vote. Antifa might just disappear overnight, same for the CRT bullshit, because guess what? Chicom money.

We might add also some pro-China governments in Latin America like Venezuela and Nicaragua. What Maduro will do without his uncle CCP?
The way you put it….sounds like Xi’s MO for taking over the world. But you’re making a lot of claim that’s probably only going to be revealed through a shitload of leaks.
 

ChefKiss

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This isnt what he actually said, he said that at some point in the future china could maybe topple Japan as the leader in anime because they receive more government support while the government of Japan doesnt treat anime as an important cultural produce. It's just animenewsnetwork being communist cocksuckers
 

Least Concern

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This isnt what he actually said, he said that at some point in the future china could maybe topple Japan as the leader in anime because they receive more government support while the government of Japan doesnt treat anime as an important cultural produce. It's just animenewsnetwork being communist cocksuckers
Not watching the video since I'm not a big fan of Clownfish TV but Japan has in the recent past recognized the value of anime in spreading Japanese culture and bringing in foreign money. The value of the latter is obvious but the value of the former is that foreigners that enjoy Japanese cultural output might be more likely to side with Japan in international issues or pressure politicians to do the same. (Pretty sure the South Korean government is over the moon with the K-Pop/Parasite/Squid Game/etc. boom for the same reasons.) If they really are slacking off in their promotion of anime and other Japanese cultural exports at this time when weebery is practically normalized in the West, at the same time that China is rattling sabers so loudly, they'd be best to pick up the slack.