Coffee - gween tea

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Juan But Not Forgotten

Friendly mexican ghost
True & Honest Fan
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Aug 7, 2017
Freshly ground in geyser coffee maker. Like when it's bitter, but don't like when it's sour. I wish I could understand more about coffee, so I could prepare a better one.
 

sola scriptura

The joy of the Lord is our strength
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Oct 28, 2020
I make my coffee with a keurig most of the time but I use knockoff reusable k-cups. I'll drink just about any kind of coffee, any kind of roast is fine with me. I like the seasonal flavors that start popping up around this time of year, like pumpkin spice and peppermint. I usually take my coffee black or with a splash of milk. Not a huge fan of sweeteners but sometimes some hazelnut creamer can be nice.
 

Orange Rhymer

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Oct 12, 2019
I make my coffee with a keurig most of the time but I use knockoff reusable k-cups. I'll drink just about any kind of coffee, any kind of roast is fine with me. I like the seasonal flavors that start popping up around this time of year, like pumpkin spice and peppermint. I usually take my coffee black or with a splash of milk. Not a huge fan of sweeteners but sometimes some hazelnut creamer can be nice.
Give up the keurig. Garbage coffee quality, plus the off flavors made by hot plastic K Cups.

Get a single cup 'pourover' drip holder for $5. Get some filters, and make some coffee that is worth the time and flavor.
 

sola scriptura

The joy of the Lord is our strength
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Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Give up the keurig. Garbage coffee quality, plus the off flavors made by hot plastic K Cups.

Get a single cup 'pourover' drip holder for $5. Get some filters, and make some coffee that is worth the time and flavor.
I'll definitely look into that. Thank you for the suggestion.
 

Drain Todger

Unhinged Doomsayer
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Mar 1, 2020
I like my coffee made with medium roast 100% Arabica beans, brewed in just about any manner. Drip, percolated, French Press, Aeropress, espresso, Turkish coffee, Cowboy coffee, whatever. I don't care what the method is. So long as the result is a cup of joe that I can put a little cream and/or or sugar in, I'm happy.

The important thing is that the equipment is nice and clean with no burnt-tasting residual coffee oils, and the temperature of the water must never reach boiling. The ideal temp to brew coffee is right at about 198 to 200 F.

Coffee tastes like shit. If you're tired in the morning do some exercises to wake up.

Most people who think coffee is shit have never tasted it done correctly. They've tasted watery, bitter Robusta beans brewed at too high of temperature in a dirty machine. You all know what I mean. Everyone has that commercial Bunn machine in the corner of their office that hasn't been cleaned in eons. There are dregs of burnt coffee oil in the carafe from when Carl Sagan was still alive.

A true cup of coffee is not bitter at all, and has a smooth, almost herbal flavor. Most don't even realize that the cultivar of the bean and the color of the roast are the most important part. Americans are infatuated with oily, dark roasts that are practically burnt until all the flavor is gone. That's not how Italians do espresso. They use a nice medium roast bean, like Lavazza. Don't buy into that bullshit about matching beans and roasts with brew styles, either. Almost all brewing techniques are amenable to the use of a 100% Arabica medium roast bean, with very few exceptions (cold brew coffee should probably be a dark roast, for instance, but if you drink cold brew coffee on a regular basis, you're probably a hipster with a man bun and I hate you). Yes, you can use "espresso beans" to make drip coffee (expensive, but the result will always be rather nice drip coffee), but I don't really recommend going in the other direction unless you want to be short on crema.

The grind must be fresh. Never buy pre-ground coffee! It's already been ruined. It doesn't matter how well the bag is vacuum-packed. The stuff is oxidized to hell because grinding it exposes a very large surface area. Part of the whole coffee-making experience is the sound and aroma of the beans being violently crushed into powder; if you skip it, you're a miscreant and a knave. Let no more than 30 seconds to a minute pass between grinding and beginning to brew, especially with espresso (which is very sensitive to the oxidation of the grounds).

Select a medium roast coffee that's 100% Arabica, grind with a good burr grinder (or a whirlyblade that isn't crap, like one of those spice grinders with the removable cup), start brewing as fast as you can using clean equipment, let the water reach no more than about 200 F during the process, and you're basically guaranteed a good cup of coffee so long as the ratio of grounds to water is correct. That's really all there is to it. There isn't a good excuse for bad coffee.

If you want a good drip machine, get a Technivorm Moccamaster. Ignore the sticker shock, just get it. You will not regret it.
 

Cardenio

*YAWN*
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Jul 14, 2018
I like my coffee made with medium roast 100% Arabica beans, brewed in just about any manner. Drip, percolated, French Press, Aeropress, espresso, Turkish coffee, Cowboy coffee, whatever. I don't care what the method is. So long as the result is a cup of joe that I can put a little cream and/or or sugar in, I'm happy.

The important thing is that the equipment is nice and clean with no burnt-tasting residual coffee oils, and the temperature of the water must never reach boiling. The ideal temp to brew coffee is right at about 198 to 200 F.



Most people who think coffee is shit have never tasted it done correctly. They've tasted watery, bitter Robusta beans brewed at too high of temperature in a dirty machine. You all know what I mean. Everyone has that commercial Bunn machine in the corner of their office that hasn't been cleaned in eons. There are dregs of burnt coffee oil in the carafe from when Carl Sagan was still alive.

A true cup of coffee is not bitter at all, and has a smooth, almost herbal flavor. Most don't even realize that the cultivar of the bean and the color of the roast are the most important part. Americans are infatuated with oily, dark roasts that are practically burnt until all the flavor is gone. That's not how Italians do espresso. They use a nice medium roast bean, like Lavazza. Don't buy into that bullshit about matching beans and roasts with brew styles, either. Almost all brewing techniques are amenable to the use of a 100% Arabica medium roast bean, with very few exceptions (cold brew coffee should probably be a dark roast, for instance, but if you drink cold brew coffee on a regular basis, you're probably a hipster with a man bun and I hate you). Yes, you can use "espresso beans" to make drip coffee (expensive, but the result will always be rather nice drip coffee), but I don't really recommend going in the other direction unless you want to be short on crema.

The grind must be fresh. Never buy pre-ground coffee! It's already been ruined. It doesn't matter how well the bag is vacuum-packed. The stuff is oxidized to hell because grinding it exposes a very large surface area. Part of the whole coffee-making experience is the sound and aroma of the beans being violently crushed into powder; if you skip it, you're a miscreant and a knave. Let no more than 30 seconds to a minute pass between grinding and beginning to brew, especially with espresso (which is very sensitive to the oxidation of the grounds).

Select a medium roast coffee that's 100% Arabica, grind with a good burr grinder (or a whirlyblade that isn't crap, like one of those spice grinders with the removable cup), start brewing as fast as you can using clean equipment, let the water reach no more than about 200 F during the process, and you're basically guaranteed a good cup of coffee so long as the ratio of grounds to water is correct. That's really all there is to it. There isn't a good excuse for bad coffee.

If you want a good drip machine, get a Technivorm Moccamaster. Ignore the sticker shock, just get it. You will not regret it.
I couldn't have said it better myself, for nearly a decade now I've prided myself as a coffee snob. It wasn't until very recent that I truly realized that oily beans were not an indicator of good coffee. Far from it the "French Roast" was clearly a last ditch to make some old low quality beans palatable. I would only use it in the event someone wanted a Latte with a Smokey flavor.

Personally I like the Chemex, the filters aren't too expensive and it goes along nicely with a Tea Kettle. In addition I also bought the most basic Breville Espresso Machine and I think it's an incredible value. One day I'd like to justify a high end $1000+ Espresso machine but for now I'm happy with making Espresso & Lattes that are on par with the ones available from my local coffee shop. The only downside with my current Breville is I can't Steam Milk & Make Espresso at the same time. But I'm only making two lattes at a time so this is far from a deal breaker.
 

Orange Rhymer

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Oct 12, 2019
You don't need to be 'bougie' to drink good coffee. But I understand your distaste for 'coffee snobs'.

There are decent 'can brands': Stewart's and 8 o'clock are p good.
 

agility_

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Feb 4, 2020
An italian once showed me how to grind, press and boil water for a decent cup of coffee. I haven't bothered to try either keurig nor the snob hipster shit, all thanks to that person.
 

Coffee Druid

Your cordial caffeinated chevalier
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Jun 5, 2020
I got lost on my way home recently and found myself near a coffee shop I’ve been wanting to try. Pretty good. Didn’t realize that what I got had four shots of espresso in it until halfway through and I really felt it.

I’m pretty open minded about coffee. I make mine at home with a pour over, go to Starbucks, but my favorite is small local shops. The coffee just tastes better there. Plus I get wistful of having weekend morning chats with friends while sipping a latte before we had to worry about shutdowns.
 

Heckler1

This is a good cat picture
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May 7, 2018
I love a good mocha. Something so pleasant about a nice chocolatey coffee on a cold afternoon that is absolutely delightful. Maybe with some nice toast on the side.
 

awoo

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Apr 20, 2018
I love a good mocha. Something so pleasant about a nice chocolatey coffee on a cold afternoon that is absolutely delightful. Maybe with some nice toast on the side.
comfy post
 

Gaear Grimsrud

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Dec 29, 2020
I love me some coffee.

I drank half of this today, straight from the carton.

71+qVwQ0eiL._SL1500_.jpg
 

Vingle

I'm Kaito Momota, Luminary of the Stars! 百田 解斗
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Oct 11, 2020
I can't stand coffee, the smell make me nauseous and the taste is like watery mud. I can only stand it when it's more sugar and milk than actual coffee, so Starbucks.
Tea is fine straight, but I'm lazy. So I rather take a mix of caffeine pill, green tea extract and l theanine
 

SneedKing

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
The grind must be fresh. Never buy pre-ground coffee! It's already been ruined. It doesn't matter how well the bag is vacuum-packed. The stuff is oxidized to hell because grinding it exposes a very large surface area. Part of the whole coffee-making experience is the sound and aroma of the beans being violently crushed into powder; if you skip it, you're a miscreant and a knave. Let no more than 30 seconds to a minute pass between grinding and beginning to brew, especially with espresso (which is very sensitive to the oxidation of the grounds).

Select a medium roast coffee that's 100% Arabica, grind with a good burr grinder (or a whirlyblade that isn't crap, like one of those spice grinders with the removable cup), start brewing as fast as you can using clean equipment, let the water reach no more than about 200 F during the process, and you're basically guaranteed a good cup of coffee so long as the ratio of grounds to water is correct. That's really all there is to it. There isn't a good excuse for bad coffee.
While this is true, you can take a Folger's or a Maxwell House, total mass-market, preground shit that's been roasted months before hitting the shelves, and still see massive improvements just from not putting it through a shitty Mr Coffee.
I recently ran out of decent coffee, couldn't be assed to go to the roaster, and just got some Chock Full o' Nuts. Made a cup in the Chemex knockoff I have, water just under boiling, bloomed, a couple separate pours, done. It was so, so much smoother than through my mom's old drip machine.

So for people who think this
I can't stand coffee, the smell make me nauseous and the taste is like watery mud. I can only stand it when it's more sugar and milk than actual coffee, so Starbucks.
Tea is fine straight, but I'm lazy. So I rather take a mix of caffeine pill, green tea extract and l theanine
Find a coffee autist and try a cup in their preferred method
A decent cup needn't be expensive
 

Harlay de Champvallon

Archevêque de Paris, Duc de Saint-Cloud
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Nov 3, 2019
I grind some Ethiopian beans, brew the espresso with machine also foams the milk. That's it.