Could the 110th country to expel the Jews be Israel?

What would be your reaction if Ultra-Orthodox Jews actually get themselves expelled from Israel?

  • God Wills It!

  • From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.

  • I Love the State of Israeli, that is all.

  • Love is love!

  • Love live the Hilonim, Israel will become more democratic and majority Arab

  • Love live the Haredim, Israel will adopt halakha and become even deeper levels of welfare dependant

  • Parting with friends is a sadness. A place is only a place.

  • Hope clouds observation.

  • There is no escape — we all pay for the violence of our ancestors.

  • All men are truly known by what they despise.

  • The concept of progress acts as a protective mechanism to shield us from the terrors of the future.

  • As with all things sacred, Israel gave with one hand and now takes with the other.

  • Power isolates those who hold too much of it. Eventually, they lose touch with reality... and fall.

  • You do not take from this universe. It grants you what it will.

  • Was it defeat to choose a lesser evil?

  • Often there's no need to tear off an arm to remove a splinter.

  • Government and nations are shared myths. When a myth dies, government and nations die too.

  • Those who seek freedom become captive. Those who seek discipline find liberty.

  • Providence and Manifest Destiny are synonyms often invoked to support arguments based on wishful thi

  • Learning a language represents training in the delusions of that language.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Haim Arlosoroff

We all failed to secure the existence of Linconia.
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
1625036443256.gif
⛔ For Your Attention: ⛔
According to leading anti-hate organizations
no bias, discrimination or hate towards the
🇮🇱 Great State of Israel will be allowed 🇮🇱
in this thread due to the high risk of the
💔 rising hate that harms us all 💔
and anti-minority extremism
💕👩‍🦽👪👩‍👧‍👧🙇‍♀️🧙‍♂️💩🙈👨‍❤️‍💋‍👨👨‍👦👨‍👧‍👧🧚‍♀️💞


Kiwi Farms, and its owner Joshua Moon, will defend Israel’s right to exist, calling out those who delegitimize and demonize her. We work everyday to expose bigotry for what it is, whether it’s cloaked in political rhetoric, academic theories or calls for boycotts.
We don’t care how you vote, but we do care what you value. Kiwi Farms is principled, not political. We believe in the power of inclusion and uniting people from diverse groups into Israel—because Israel will be stronger together than when apart. We choose truth, not sides.



110 Countries.png
Jews expelled from Guatemala village.jpg

TL;DR: Israel just had three elections in a row because of the ultra-fundamentalists who are being accused of spreading COVID endangering the rest of Israel and clogging their health care. Imagine Israel becoming #110!

Israel has based itself on two non-negotiable opposite identities. The homeland of all Jews, whether or not they are citizens of Israel. And the state of all its citizens, whether or not they are Jews. These two nations within one state have always been at war with one another for cultural supremacy. Democracy's basic principles require equal treatment of all those included as citizens of the State, the recognition of the core human rights, including dignity and equality, separation of powers, the rule of law, and an independent judiciary, are all drawn from these principles. In Israel there is an ethno-cultural division that Jews place themselves into of hilonim "secular", masortim "traditional" dati'im, "religious" or haredim "ultra-religious". An opinion poll released in March 2016 by the Pew Research Center found high support among religious Israeli Jews for a Jewish state governed by halakha, the Jewish fundamentalist bigotry of ethnic exclusion and injustice. The poll found that 57% of traditional Jews and 90% of secular Jews believe the best way to protect religious liberty is to keep government out of religion while 86% of Israeli Haredi "ultra-religious" Jews and 69% of Dati and Masorti religious Jews supported making halakha Israel's legal code.

The religious status quo, agreed to by David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister and minister of defense, with the Orthodox parties at the time of Israel's formation in 1948, is an agreement on the role that Judaism would play in Israel's government and the judicial system. The agreement was based upon a letter sent by Ben-Gurion to Agudat Israel dated 19 June 1947. Under this agreement, which still operates in most respects today:
  • The Chief Rabbinate has authority over kashrut, Shabbat, Jewish burial and personal status issues, such as marriage, divorce, and conversions.
  • Streets in Haredi neighborhoods are closed to traffic on the Jewish Sabbath. There is no public transport on the Jewish Sabbath, and most businesses are closed. However, there is public transport in Haifa, since Haifa had a large Arab population at the time of the British Mandate.
  • Restaurants who wish to advertise themselves as kosher must be certified by the Chief Rabbinate.
  • Importation of non-kosher foods is prohibited.
Despite the status quo, a few pork farms supply establishments quickly began selling white meat, due to demand among specific population sectors, particularly the eventual Russian immigrants of the 1990s. The Supreme Court even ruled in 2004 that local governments are not allowed to ban the sale of pork, although this had previously been a common by-law. Some breaches of the status quo have become open and prevalent, such as several suburban malls remaining open during the Sabbath. Though this is contrary to the law, the government largely turns a blind eye. While the state of Israel enables freedom of religion for all of its citizens, it does not enable civil marriage. The state forbids and disapproves of any civil marriages or non-religious divorces performed amongst within the country. Because of this, some Israelis choose to marry outside of Israel. Many parts of the "status quo" have been challenged by the Hiloni regarding the Chief Rabbinate's strict control over Jewish weddings, Jewish divorce proceedings, conversions, and the question of who is a Jew for the purposes of immigration. Today the Hiloni claim that they are ethnically Jewish only and don't observe Jewish law, and that Israel as a democratic modern country should not force the observance thereof upon its citizens against their will. The Dati and the Haredi claim that the separation between state and religion will contribute to the end of Israel's Jewish identity.

Israel Chicken.jpg

Ultra-Orthodox Jews check the health of a chicken that will later be slaughtered as part of a religious ritual in Bnei Brak, Israel, in September. (Oded Balilty / Associated Press)

However all of that was pre-COVID. The coronavirus crisis threatens to shatter a delicate social and political pact, between the haredim and the state, that has existed since Israel’s foundation.

The country woke up September 6th, 2020 believing that at a minimum, eight to 10 of Israel’s sickest cities would be locked down by the next day. Over the weekend, Israel surpassed 1,000 dead from coronavirus. But amid extreme pressure by the haredi (ultra-Orthodox) parties, the government approved imposing only “night curfews” on the 40 “reddest” cities of COVID. “Citizens of Israel, I would like to update you on the decision made by the ministerial committee tonight,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had said late that Sunday. “In the last day, another 10 cities have been added to the list of red cities and we have already reached 40 red cities. In light of this, the professionals recommended imposing a uniform nightly curfew on all of these cities, and closing the education system in them, in addition to restrictions on gatherings. Tonight’s decision was considered responsible and realistic,” the prime minister concluded. However rumors circulated, Netanyahu told haredim that even if there is a holiday lockdown, they will still be able to pray en masse in synagogues.

The decision to avoid closures came after undue political pressure by the haredim on the prime minister. Netanyahu even pushed off the ministerial meetings to bring together Interior Minister Arye Deri (Shas), Housing and Construction Minister Ya’acov Litzman (United Torah Judaism), Health Minister Yuli Edelstein and coronavirus commissioner Prof. Ronni Gamzu for an emergency meeting to discuss alternatives to the closures - as several haredi mayors sent a scathing letter to Netanyahu informing him that they would not cooperate with any closures. The letter came only hours after Gamzu arrived Sunday morning to the Constitution, Law and Justice Committee to defend his traffic light program and discuss what it will look like in the “red cities” that were expected to be locked down. That meeting also ended with no resolution, only an agreement to meet Monday at 9 a.m. to resume discussions.

With pain and restrained rage, we see day after the day how the honor of the great men of the Torah, the life of the Torah... are trampled on by you in an unparalleled way,” the mayors wrote in a direct attack against the prime minister. “We hereby announce that we will stop cooperating with the various authorities regarding the lockdown.

Two weeks later, as the Israeli government grappled with whether to lift its second national coronavirus lockdown, families frazzled over the shutdown of schools were treated to the jarring sight of ultra-Orthodox children boisterously returning to class. These children — or, more precisely, their parents — were following the edict of Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky, the most prominent ultra-Orthodox voice in Israel, who ordered the talmudei torah to open on the same day that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government decided to keep schools shut. But it drew almost no pushback by Israeli authorities, who have cracked down only halfheartedly at best on the rule-breaking and virus-spreading activities in the ultra-Orthodox community, such as communal study and crowded weddings, that are fueling a massive second wave of coronavirus cases there. What to do about the haredim, as the ultra-Orthodox are called in Israel, has now become the greatest test of Netanyahu’s response to the pandemic. Ultra-Orthodox Israelis account for about 11% of the population but more than 50% of the COVID-19 patients ages 65 and older who are filling hospitals, according to the Israeli Health Ministry.

If until now the majority of Israelis went about their business oblivious to the intricacies of Netanyahu’s political maneuvering, the coronavirus crisis made that then impossible. “As long as he accepted 100% of their demands in the domestic arena,” Yohanan Plesner, president of the independent Jerusalem think tank Israel Democracy Institute, said, “Netanyahu understood that ensuring they’re on his side will pretty much guarantee him something like a monopoly over political power.” That has led to increasing social tension that has produced some extraordinary scenes in Israel. National news station Kan Broadcasting posted video of a crowded ultra-Orthodox seaside wedding in Bat Yam, south of Tel Aviv, where masks and social distancing were in little evidence. Such videos have become daily occurrences, provoking sharp criticism of the police for lax enforcement of the lockdown — and of the ultra-Orthodox for their seeming indifference to public health. One week prior, a survey by the Israel Democracy Institute found that only 31% of Israelis trust his handling of the pandemic, and another poll found that 64% believe the second lockdown was based not on science but on politics.

Israel riot.jpg

Police remove an ultra-Orthodox Jewish man during a protest over the coronavirus restrictions in Ashdod, Israel, on Sunday. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)

The long-building tensions over pandemic restrictions within Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods finally gave way and erupted in violence on the night of January 24th as rock-throwing crowds pushed back police attempts to clear yeshiva classes and religious gatherings being held in violation of lockdown rules. Violent haredi (ultra-Orthodox) protests took place in several parts of the country that Sunday as police sought to enforce COVID-19 lockdown regulations. The haredi community opposed any/all efforts to shut down educational institutions and synagogues. Rioters burned trash and toppled street signs and light poles in several cities across Israel. In Bnei Brak, a bus driver was pulled from his seat and pepper-sprayed before the vehicle was torched, according to news and social media reports, leading to several buildings being evacuated as the blaze damaged electrical lines. At one point, a cornered police officer fired into the air to halt the advancing crowd. Angry citizens directed much of their frustration at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, even as he was declining to step up enforcement in ultra-Orthodox communities fundamental to his right-wing coalition. The police said one of the officers was taken to a hospital after being hit in the head by a stone thrown by a rioter, and another officer felt someone poke him in the back with a blunt object, leading him to fire the warning shot. Outside the hospital, officers were pelted with various objects, police patrol vehicles were damaged, and rubbish bins were burned as hundreds of haredim protested.

In another incident in Bnei Brak, a Channel 13 reporter walking down one of the city’s main thoroughfares was jostled and hounded by a mob of protesters as he was reporting. Police arrested at least five rioters. The Eda Haredit communal association had called for more mass demonstrations that Wednesday night against coronavirus enforcement by the police and government.

Amid the mass demonstrations and rioting there were counterclaims of uneven enforcement of lockdown regulations, in which people sitting alone in parks in Tel Aviv got fined while large Haredi gatherings continued to take place and were largely ignored by authorities, figures released in February 2021 revealed that police were handing out proportionally far more fines in predominantly secular localities than in ultra-Orthodox ones. According to Channel 13 news, there were 110 fines given in Herzliya per 10,000 residents in the month of January, 117 in Bat Yam and 155 in Tel Aviv. All three locations have a mainly secular population and have generally had relatively low rates of infection throughout the pandemic. In contrast, there were just 59 fines handed out per 10,000 residents in the predominantly ultra-Orthodox city of Bnei Brak, which had struggled with high levels of morbidity for large periods of the pandemic and was classified in early 2021 as a high infection locality.

Israeli crowds.jpg

Ultra-Orthodox men attend the funeral of late Rabbi Yitzchok Sheiner, in Jerusalem, January 31, 2021. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
The Health Ministry’s data, based on averages of new cases over late Jan 2021, showed that 23 percent of new cases were from people who come from areas that are predominantly Haredi, even though just 12% of Israelis belong to the ultra-Orthodox community. A battle of attrition was being fought with big black Hebrew letters on large white posters in Israel's most devout Jewish neighborhoods. Nearly every day this winter, a new pashkevil — Yiddish for street poster — would appear with a dire warning against the COVID-19 vaccine. "The vaccines for corona are suspected of dark conspiracies and grave dangers," one poster said. "Who knows if more than a thousand people who died in the Holy Land, may the All-Merciful protect us, would have stayed alive if they would not have taken the vaccine," lamented another. By June things had shifted into the political realm yet again, as elections had finally ousted Netanyahu, leading supporter of the Haredi. Rabbi Gershon Edelstein, one of the most senior ultra-Orthodox rabbis in the country, lamented the new government’s plans over changes to religious life, alleging that it seeks to stop people being religious. Edelstein went on to say that ultra-Orthodox community needs to earn merit by assiduously observing the religious commandments and thereby earn divine grace to avert the decrees planned by the government. And the Members of the Knesset, the unicameral legislature of Israel, of the ultra-Orthodox political parties Shas and United Torah Judaism all signed a declaration promising not work with any ultra-Orthodox advisers who work with the new government. Due to the political deadlock from December 2019 until June 2021, when the new government was formed, many ministries have been stuck with whatever old budget levels were left to them as of 2019.

As a result, Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel Yitzhak Yosef paskened (issued a religious law ruling) that observant Jews in the Diaspora should not move to Israel if it means living in such non-haredi areas. In other words, it is better for Dati'im to live in galut (the Diaspora) than among Hilonim.

When I visited the Tunisian Jewish community, I was asked to rule whether or not Djerba’s Jews should immigrate to Israel,” said Yosef. “I told them it depends on where they would live. If they are going to live in an ultra-Orthodox neighborhood or next to Kisse Rahamim [a Bnei Brak yeshiva founded in Tunisia], then they should immigrate to Israel. But if they are to live in a place like Herzliya or another one of the secular locations... they should stay where they are.” In late June, Rabbi Yosef went on a rant against general education, arguing that science and math are “nonsense,” and therefore youths should study only in yeshivas that teach Torah subjects exclusively, “Myself, did I learn the core curriculum? Did I finish school? Even today I don’t have a graduation certificate – not a high school diploma and not a graduation certificate. Have I missed anything? No. And look at the position I have risen to! So [secular studies are] nonsense. The most important thing is our holy Torah.”

On the other hand, Hiloni think that Yitzhak Yosef is essentially promoting Haredi dependence on government handouts and charitable donations instead of advancing self-reliance and community dignity through basic education. The failure to give boys in the ultra-Orthodox sector core skills in English, math, science and good citizenship, combined with the high population growth of that community, means that Israel’s 21st-century, high-tech-oriented economy, and its Western democratic values, are in peril. David M. Weinberg, vice president of the Jerusalem Institute for Strategy and Security, believes most of all that the system for choosing Israel’s next chief rabbis, and the criteria for becoming a chief rabbi, must be fortified dramatically, and long before the next vote in 2023. That Religious-Zionist commitment, a Torah worldview that embraces broad education, the dignity of difference and a fruitful problem-solving approach should be mandatory benchmarks. To ensure Israel elects cosmopolitan and reasonable chief rabbis.

TL;DR: Israel just had three elections in a row because of the ultra-fundamentalists who are being accused of spreading COVID endangering the rest of Israel and clogging their health care. Imagine Israel being #110 for Jews!
 

Opticana

hello fellow goyim
kiwifarms.net
Joined
May 13, 2021
No. Haredim spend all day in kollel doing nothing productive and living off Shlomo Reichnitz and government funding, but they have ten children each. Liberal Israeli academics spend all day doing nothing productive and living off the New Israel Fund and government funding, but they have only three children each and one of them is probably gay (if they're Dati and live in Gush Etzion this is a certainty).
 
Last edited:

Haim Arlosoroff

We all failed to secure the existence of Linconia.
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jan 27, 2021
"Those fucking kikes" -Random Jew.

Reminds me of this Sopranos scene where a Jew warns Tony not to make deals with Jews.
They of course do screw them over, use the Goyrim for intimidation and then make a new deal to suggest Tony didn't really do anything.

so is this confirmation that the coofrona is or isn't a jewish conspiracy?
There is every chance it was an elitist-banked cheap Chinese attempt at making a superflu that escaped right after it became human transmissible but before it really got engineered.


Especially if the gene injection and later resurgence of HIV was engineered into it. Combine that with RNA therapies which induce both immune amnesia by harsh prion eradication taking up the finite space in your Immunological memory, and covering up the severest symptoms to prevent social and immune response? Population control because you can instill social control over people similar to the hydraulic empires of ancient near east.

Of course that is the malicious elite theory, the stupid elite theory is just that China could do “gain-of-function” research cheaper and damn the consequences. Hard to say which. Or it could be exactly what Biden, the Press, and China are telling us, if that is really the likely, rather than cowardly, story to believe.
 

spiky

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Feb 14, 2021
As long as he accepted 100% of their demands in the domestic arena,” Yohanan Plesner, president of the independent Jerusalem think tank Israel Democracy Institute, said, “Netanyahu understood that ensuring they’re on his side will pretty much guarantee him something like a monopoly over political power.”

Lmao they're doing the same shit they do in New York
 

draggs

Kyle Avgvstvs, Antifvs Maximvs. AVE KYLE
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Joined
Aug 22, 2020
Lol no are you high nobody's kicking the Chosen Chosen out of their Chosencaves
 

L50LasPak

We have all the time in the world.
Forum Staff
⚡ Thunderdomer ⚡
💬 Off-Topic Mod 💬
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Sep 25, 2019
This is one of the funniest things I've read in recent memory. I love watching people turn on each other.
 

Lemmingwise

I paid the right click price, not the crypto price
True & Honest Fan
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Joined
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You shouldn't take funny jokes so serious.
 

Dirty Diamond

Dirty Diamond
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Joined
Jan 3, 2020
View attachment 2348736
⛔For Your Attention:⛔
According to leading anti-hate organizations
no bias, discrimination or hate towards the
🇮🇱 Great State of Israel will be allowed 🇮🇱
in this thread due to the high risk of the
💔 rising hate that harms us all 💔
and anti-minority extremism
💕👩‍🦽👪👩‍👧‍👧🙇‍♀️🧙‍♂️💩🙈👨‍❤️‍💋‍👨👨‍👦👨‍👧‍👧🧚‍♀️💞


Kiwi Farms, and its owner Joshua Moon, will defend Israel’s right to exist, calling out those who delegitimize and demonize her. We work everyday to expose bigotry for what it is, whether it’s cloaked in political rhetoric, academic theories or calls for boycotts.
We don’t care how you vote, but we do care what you value. Kiwi Farms is principled, not political. We believe in the power of inclusion and uniting people from diverse groups into Israel—because Israel will be stronger together than when apart. We choose truth, not sides.



View attachment 2348738View attachment 2348796

TL;DR: Israel just had three elections in a row because of the ultra-fundamentalists who are being accused of spreading COVID endangering the rest of Israel and clogging their health care. Imagine Israel becoming #110!

Israel has based itself on two non-negotiable opposite identities. The homeland of all Jews, whether or not they are citizens of Israel. And the state of all its citizens, whether or not they are Jews. These two nations within one state have always been at war with one another for cultural supremacy. Democracy's basic principles require equal treatment of all those included as citizens of the State, the recognition of the core human rights, including dignity and equality, separation of powers, the rule of law, and an independent judiciary, are all drawn from these principles. In Israel there is an ethno-cultural division that Jews place themselves into of hilonim "secular", masortim "traditional" dati'im, "religious" or haredim "ultra-religious". An opinion poll released in March 2016 by the Pew Research Center found high support among religious Israeli Jews for a Jewish state governed by halakha, the Jewish fundamentalist bigotry of ethnic exclusion and injustice. The poll found that 57% of traditional Jews and 90% of secular Jews believe the best way to protect religious liberty is to keep government out of religion while 86% of Israeli Haredi "ultra-religious" Jews and 69% of Dati and Masorti religious Jews supported making halakha Israel's legal code.

The religious status quo, agreed to by David Ben-Gurion, Israel's first prime minister and minister of defense, with the Orthodox parties at the time of Israel's formation in 1948, is an agreement on the role that Judaism would play in Israel's government and the judicial system. The agreement was based upon a letter sent by Ben-Gurion to Agudat Israel dated 19 June 1947. Under this agreement, which still operates in most respects today:
  • The Chief Rabbinate has authority over kashrut, Shabbat, Jewish burial and personal status issues, such as marriage, divorce, and conversions.
  • Streets in Haredi neighborhoods are closed to traffic on the Jewish Sabbath. There is no public transport on the Jewish Sabbath, and most businesses are closed. However, there is public transport in Haifa, since Haifa had a large Arab population at the time of the British Mandate.
  • Restaurants who wish to advertise themselves as kosher must be certified by the Chief Rabbinate.
  • Importation of non-kosher foods is prohibited.
Despite the status quo, a few pork farms supply establishments quickly began selling white meat, due to demand among specific population sectors, particularly the eventual Russian immigrants of the 1990s. The Supreme Court even ruled in 2004 that local governments are not allowed to ban the sale of pork, although this had previously been a common by-law. Some breaches of the status quo have become open and prevalent, such as several suburban malls remaining open during the Sabbath. Though this is contrary to the law, the government largely turns a blind eye. While the state of Israel enables freedom of religion for all of its citizens, it does not enable civil marriage. The state forbids and disapproves of any civil marriages or non-religious divorces performed amongst within the country. Because of this, some Israelis choose to marry outside of Israel. Many parts of the "status quo" have been challenged by the Hiloni regarding the Chief Rabbinate's strict control over Jewish weddings, Jewish divorce proceedings, conversions, and the question of who is a Jew for the purposes of immigration. Today the Hiloni claim that they are ethnically Jewish only and don't observe Jewish law, and that Israel as a democratic modern country should not force the observance thereof upon its citizens against their will. The Dati and the Haredi claim that the separation between state and religion will contribute to the end of Israel's Jewish identity.

View attachment 2348739
Ultra-Orthodox Jews check the health of a chicken that will later be slaughtered as part of a religious ritual in Bnei Brak, Israel, in September. (Oded Balilty / Associated Press)

However all of that was pre-COVID. The coronavirus crisis threatens to shatter a delicate social and political pact, between the haredim and the state, that has existed since Israel’s foundation.

The country woke up September 6th, 2020 believing that at a minimum, eight to 10 of Israel’s sickest cities would be locked down by the next day. Over the weekend, Israel surpassed 1,000 dead from coronavirus. But amid extreme pressure by the haredi (ultra-Orthodox) parties, the government approved imposing only “night curfews” on the 40 “reddest” cities of COVID. “Citizens of Israel, I would like to update you on the decision made by the ministerial committee tonight,” Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had said late that Sunday. “In the last day, another 10 cities have been added to the list of red cities and we have already reached 40 red cities. In light of this, the professionals recommended imposing a uniform nightly curfew on all of these cities, and closing the education system in them, in addition to restrictions on gatherings. Tonight’s decision was considered responsible and realistic,” the prime minister concluded. However rumors circulated, Netanyahu told haredim that even if there is a holiday lockdown, they will still be able to pray en masse in synagogues.

The decision to avoid closures came after undue political pressure by the haredim on the prime minister. Netanyahu even pushed off the ministerial meetings to bring together Interior Minister Arye Deri (Shas), Housing and Construction Minister Ya’acov Litzman (United Torah Judaism), Health Minister Yuli Edelstein and coronavirus commissioner Prof. Ronni Gamzu for an emergency meeting to discuss alternatives to the closures - as several haredi mayors sent a scathing letter to Netanyahu informing him that they would not cooperate with any closures. The letter came only hours after Gamzu arrived Sunday morning to the Constitution, Law and Justice Committee to defend his traffic light program and discuss what it will look like in the “red cities” that were expected to be locked down. That meeting also ended with no resolution, only an agreement to meet Monday at 9 a.m. to resume discussions.

With pain and restrained rage, we see day after the day how the honor of the great men of the Torah, the life of the Torah... are trampled on by you in an unparalleled way,” the mayors wrote in a direct attack against the prime minister. “We hereby announce that we will stop cooperating with the various authorities regarding the lockdown.

Two weeks later, as the Israeli government grappled with whether to lift its second national coronavirus lockdown, families frazzled over the shutdown of schools were treated to the jarring sight of ultra-Orthodox children boisterously returning to class. These children — or, more precisely, their parents — were following the edict of Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky, the most prominent ultra-Orthodox voice in Israel, who ordered the talmudei torah to open on the same day that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government decided to keep schools shut. But it drew almost no pushback by Israeli authorities, who have cracked down only halfheartedly at best on the rule-breaking and virus-spreading activities in the ultra-Orthodox community, such as communal study and crowded weddings, that are fueling a massive second wave of coronavirus cases there. What to do about the haredim, as the ultra-Orthodox are called in Israel, has now become the greatest test of Netanyahu’s response to the pandemic. Ultra-Orthodox Israelis account for about 11% of the population but more than 50% of the COVID-19 patients ages 65 and older who are filling hospitals, according to the Israeli Health Ministry.

If until now the majority of Israelis went about their business oblivious to the intricacies of Netanyahu’s political maneuvering, the coronavirus crisis made that then impossible. “As long as he accepted 100% of their demands in the domestic arena,” Yohanan Plesner, president of the independent Jerusalem think tank Israel Democracy Institute, said, “Netanyahu understood that ensuring they’re on his side will pretty much guarantee him something like a monopoly over political power.” That has led to increasing social tension that has produced some extraordinary scenes in Israel. National news station Kan Broadcasting posted video of a crowded ultra-Orthodox seaside wedding in Bat Yam, south of Tel Aviv, where masks and social distancing were in little evidence. Such videos have become daily occurrences, provoking sharp criticism of the police for lax enforcement of the lockdown — and of the ultra-Orthodox for their seeming indifference to public health. One week prior, a survey by the Israel Democracy Institute found that only 31% of Israelis trust his handling of the pandemic, and another poll found that 64% believe the second lockdown was based not on science but on politics.

View attachment 2348780
Police remove an ultra-Orthodox Jewish man during a protest over the coronavirus restrictions in Ashdod, Israel, on Sunday. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)

The long-building tensions over pandemic restrictions within Israel's ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods finally gave way and erupted in violence on the night of January 24th as rock-throwing crowds pushed back police attempts to clear yeshiva classes and religious gatherings being held in violation of lockdown rules. Violent haredi (ultra-Orthodox) protests took place in several parts of the country that Sunday as police sought to enforce COVID-19 lockdown regulations. The haredi community opposed any/all efforts to shut down educational institutions and synagogues. Rioters burned trash and toppled street signs and light poles in several cities across Israel. In Bnei Brak, a bus driver was pulled from his seat and pepper-sprayed before the vehicle was torched, according to news and social media reports, leading to several buildings being evacuated as the blaze damaged electrical lines. At one point, a cornered police officer fired into the air to halt the advancing crowd. Angry citizens directed much of their frustration at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, even as he was declining to step up enforcement in ultra-Orthodox communities fundamental to his right-wing coalition. The police said one of the officers was taken to a hospital after being hit in the head by a stone thrown by a rioter, and another officer felt someone poke him in the back with a blunt object, leading him to fire the warning shot. Outside the hospital, officers were pelted with various objects, police patrol vehicles were damaged, and rubbish bins were burned as hundreds of haredim protested.

In another incident in Bnei Brak, a Channel 13 reporter walking down one of the city’s main thoroughfares was jostled and hounded by a mob of protesters as he was reporting. Police arrested at least five rioters. The Eda Haredit communal association had called for more mass demonstrations that Wednesday night against coronavirus enforcement by the police and government.

Amid the mass demonstrations and rioting there were counterclaims of uneven enforcement of lockdown regulations, in which people sitting alone in parks in Tel Aviv got fined while large Haredi gatherings continued to take place and were largely ignored by authorities, figures released in February 2021 revealed that police were handing out proportionally far more fines in predominantly secular localities than in ultra-Orthodox ones. According to Channel 13 news, there were 110 fines given in Herzliya per 10,000 residents in the month of January, 117 in Bat Yam and 155 in Tel Aviv. All three locations have a mainly secular population and have generally had relatively low rates of infection throughout the pandemic. In contrast, there were just 59 fines handed out per 10,000 residents in the predominantly ultra-Orthodox city of Bnei Brak, which had struggled with high levels of morbidity for large periods of the pandemic and was classified in early 2021 as a high infection locality.

View attachment 2348809
Ultra-Orthodox men attend the funeral of late Rabbi Yitzchok Sheiner, in Jerusalem, January 31, 2021. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
The Health Ministry’s data, based on averages of new cases over late Jan 2021, showed that 23 percent of new cases were from people who come from areas that are predominantly Haredi, even though just 12% of Israelis belong to the ultra-Orthodox community. A battle of attrition was being fought with big black Hebrew letters on large white posters in Israel's most devout Jewish neighborhoods. Nearly every day this winter, a new pashkevil — Yiddish for street poster — would appear with a dire warning against the COVID-19 vaccine. "The vaccines for corona are suspected of dark conspiracies and grave dangers," one poster said. "Who knows if more than a thousand people who died in the Holy Land, may the All-Merciful protect us, would have stayed alive if they would not have taken the vaccine," lamented another. By June things had shifted into the political realm yet again, as elections had finally ousted Netanyahu, leading supporter of the Haredi. Rabbi Gershon Edelstein, one of the most senior ultra-Orthodox rabbis in the country, lamented the new government’s plans over changes to religious life, alleging that it seeks to stop people being religious. Edelstein went on to say that ultra-Orthodox community needs to earn merit by assiduously observing the religious commandments and thereby earn divine grace to avert the decrees planned by the government. And the Members of the Knesset, the unicameral legislature of Israel, of the ultra-Orthodox political parties Shas and United Torah Judaism all signed a declaration promising not work with any ultra-Orthodox advisers who work with the new government. Due to the political deadlock from December 2019 until June 2021, when the new government was formed, many ministries have been stuck with whatever old budget levels were left to them as of 2019.

As a result, Sephardi Chief Rabbi of Israel Yitzhak Yosef paskened (issued a religious law ruling) that observant Jews in the Diaspora should not move to Israel if it means living in such non-haredi areas. In other words, it is better for Dati'im to live in galut (the Diaspora) than among Hilonim.

When I visited the Tunisian Jewish community, I was asked to rule whether or not Djerba’s Jews should immigrate to Israel,” said Yosef. “I told them it depends on where they would live. If they are going to live in an ultra-Orthodox neighborhood or next to Kisse Rahamim [a Bnei Brak yeshiva founded in Tunisia], then they should immigrate to Israel. But if they are to live in a place like Herzliya or another one of the secular locations... they should stay where they are.” In late June, Rabbi Yosef went on a rant against general education, arguing that science and math are “nonsense,” and therefore youths should study only in yeshivas that teach Torah subjects exclusively, “Myself, did I learn the core curriculum? Did I finish school? Even today I don’t have a graduation certificate – not a high school diploma and not a graduation certificate. Have I missed anything? No. And look at the position I have risen to! So [secular studies are] nonsense. The most important thing is our holy Torah.”

On the other hand, Hiloni think that Yitzhak Yosef is essentially promoting Haredi dependence on government handouts and charitable donations instead of advancing self-reliance and community dignity through basic education. The failure to give boys in the ultra-Orthodox sector core skills in English, math, science and good citizenship, combined with the high population growth of that community, means that Israel’s 21st-century, high-tech-oriented economy, and its Western democratic values, are in peril. David M. Weinberg, vice president of the Jerusalem Institute for Strategy and Security, believes most of all that the system for choosing Israel’s next chief rabbis, and the criteria for becoming a chief rabbi, must be fortified dramatically, and long before the next vote in 2023. That Religious-Zionist commitment, a Torah worldview that embraces broad education, the dignity of difference and a fruitful problem-solving approach should be mandatory benchmarks. To ensure Israel elects cosmopolitan and reasonable chief rabbis.

TL;DR: Israel just had three elections in a row because of the ultra-fundamentalists who are being accused of spreading COVID endangering the rest of Israel and clogging their health care. Imagine Israel being #110 for Jews!
See, this is how antisemitic groups are formed.
 

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