CPS strike: Teachers and support staff, along with parks workers, will all strike on Oct. 17 if no contract deals reached -

Chicago

kiwifarms.net
First post here, might as well share something I'm somewhat familiar with. I'm an honest tax paying citizen that's pretty fed up with Illinois being run to the ground. I noticed I had to cite an article, not tech savvy enough to post up an archive so I don't give the corporate media their ad money.


CPS strike: Teachers and support staff, along with parks workers, will all strike on Oct. 17 if no contract deals reached

By HANNAH LEONE and GREGORY PRATT
CHICAGO TRIBUNE |
OCT 03, 2019 | 7:00 AM






Chicago Teachers Union President Jesse Sharkey, center, with union members, Chicago Park District employees, and members of SEIU Local 73, stand on a stage after a vote on a unified strike date at the teachers union's headquarters on Oct. 2, 2019. (John J. Kim / Chicago Tribune)
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The Chicago Teachers Union, school support staff and Park District workers will all go on strike together on Oct. 17 if they can’t reach contract deals by then.
The joint announcement late Wednesday by the three labor groups sets up the prospect of about 35,000 public employees in Chicago walking off the job at the same time.
It also means that the 360,000 children who attend Chicago Public Schools will be out of class indefinitely if CTU and the city fail to settle their differences by then.
But Mayor Lori Lightfoot and CPS top brass announced late Wednesday that all schools will remain open during any walkout by teachers and staff.

“In the event of a strike, all CPS school buildings will remain open during their normal school hours to ensure students have a safe and welcoming place to spend the day and warm meals to eat,” the mayor and CPS chief Janice Jackson said in a joint announcement.
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They stressed they will also do “everything in our power to reach a fair deal that prevents a strike.”
In revealing the plan for a potential three-way walkout, CTU President Jesse Sharkey said: “The schools don’t work without all of us, and our unity is our strength.”
He added: “We prefer to reach a contract settlement without a strike. ... But I want no one in the city of Chicago to doubt our resolve. We mean to improve the conditions in our schools. We mean to achieve a fair contract.”
The CTU represents 25,000 teachers employed by one of the country’s largest school systems. But the threefold announcement Wednesday means that another 7,000 CPS workers — security guards, bus aides, special education classroom assistants and custodians — and about 2,500 employees of the Chicago Park District could also all end up on picket lines together.
Each of the three labor groups had already authorized separate strikes but had not set strike dates until Wednesday. The teachers could have decided to walk out as early as Monday, but decided to try to harness the collective power of a larger labor coalition.
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“We are united with CTU and with workers standing up for themselves,” said Dian Palmer, president of Service Employees International Union Local 73, which represents both the parks workers and CPS support staff.
While the later date gives the teachers union and the city more time to settle their differences, it’s clear the two sides remain far apart, with both accusing the other of stalled responses to demands and offers.
Prior to Wednesday’s announcement, Lightfoot and officials in her administration again called on the teachers union to get a deal done without the disruption a strike would cause.
“I’m not naive about the complexities here. But I remain hopeful that if they come to the table in good faith, if they respond to our written offers that are out there, we’ll get a deal done,” the mayor said Wednesday. "And we should, because it’s in the best interests of our children and their families to get it done.”
The city’s immediate response to blunt the impact of a possible strike was its announcement that all school buildings in the system would remain open during any teacher and staff walkout. Regular instruction would not take place, but principals and non-union staff would be on hand “to greet students and ensure they have access to engaging activities,” CPS said in a letter to families. Transportation services will not be available, though.
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Charter and contract schools will maintain regular operations, officials said.
SEIU Local 73 Executive Vice President Jeffrey Howard acknowledged one reason the three units decided to set a joint strike date was because, in past teachers strikes, many parents send their children to park facilities.
This joint action, he said, “is about taking away that avenue and forcing (employers) to negotiate in good faith. ... They want to pit workers against each other."
Lightfoot said she wasn’t surprised to be facing all this labor pressure so soon after taking office. The writing was on the wall with the number of high-profile contract negotiations she walked into, she said.
Lightfoot’s administration and the Board of Education she selected, however, are facing a union whose rank-and-file members have indicated strong support for a walkout.
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A huge majority of CTU members — 94% — voted in favor last week of authorizing a strike.
The teachers union has stressed their demands not just on pay and benefits but also on a number of staffing issues, including more librarians, school nurses and social workers.
Leading up to the delegates’ meeting, Sharkey said Wednesday afternoon that the union’s “strategy is obvious. We’re trying to get the board to talk about these staffing issues.”
“I just think it, if the mayor’s point is we are not responding, let’s be clear: We are spending a lot of time at the table, putting a lot of energy into it,” he said.
But the city’s assertion that the union has been unresponsive to its offers was reiterated late Tuesday, with one of Lightfoot’s top negotiators expressing frustration that the CTU hadn’t yet provided the city a formal, written counter-proposal to its contract offers.
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The union hasn’t provided Lightfoot’s negotiators with anything in writing since Sept. 5, said Michael Frisch, a Lightfoot senior adviser who represents her at the bargaining table.
“As you know, we gave them a comprehensive offer on Friday. Again today we received nothing back in writing, which was disappointing because as you know, we are working hard from our side to present comprehensive offers to the CTU,” Frisch said. “We are very interested in getting a deal, reaching an agreement quickly and avoiding a strike that would be disruptive for our students and families. We’re not seeing that same level of urgency across the table.”
Sharkey countered Wednesday: "Our response to a number of the proposals is no. It’s not a very long response, but it’s a response. We are not interested in giving back rights that we won over the last contracts.”
The union hasn’t provided formal responses to the administration’s proposals but Frisch said they’ve brought clinicians, counselors and teachers to the table so the administration can hear their viewpoints. He called that a “useful discussion.”
“It’s helpful, but what we really need at this point is a comprehensive package offer for what it will take to get this resolved,” Frisch said. “We haven’t seen that yet.”
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Frisch stressed that, on Friday, CPS sweetened its offer by promising that a number of workers would immediately get raises under the deal. Health service nurses would immediately get an average 14% raise, while school clerks would be bumped up by at least 8% and teacher assistants would get 9% increases on average, Frisch said.
The city has also offered to keep health insurance costs for teachers unchanged for three years of a five-year pact and then raise them by less 0.75% over the last two years, Frisch said.
“This is a big deal, and I think it’s deserving of a serious response from the CTU,” Frisch said. “We’re still waiting for them.”
The city has also offered teachers 16% raises over a five-year contract, not including separate raises teachers received for each year of service. The CTU has asked for 15% over three years.
At CTU headquarters Wednesday after the joint strike announcement was made, labor leaders’ comments focused mainly on their groups’ unity. But they also took jabs at city officials.
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“I’ve a question for the mayor and the people who run the parks and schools: Do they feel guilty when they pay workers less than $20,000 a year?” Palmer, the SEIU local president, said.
Tribune reporter John Byrne contributed.
hleone@chicagotribune.com
gpratt@chicagotribune.com
Archive: https://archive.li/FRaFq
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DumbDude42

kiwifarms.net
not tech savvy enough to post up an archive
nothing to do with tech savvy my man

step one: go to an archive site such as https://archive.li/
step two: paste the link to the site you want to archive and click "save"
step three: post the archive link it spits out after everything is done

here you go: https://archive.li/FRaFq#selection-4305.143-4365.262

The Chicago Teachers Union, school support staff and Park District workers will all go on strike together on Oct. 17 if they can’t reach contract deals by then.
The joint announcement late Wednesday by the three labor groups sets up the prospect of about 35,000 public employees in Chicago walking off the job at the same time.
It also means that the 360,000 children who attend Chicago Public Schools will be out of class indefinitely if CTU and the city fail to settle their differences by then.
But Mayor Lori Lightfoot and CPS top brass announced late Wednesday that all schools will remain open during any walkout by teachers and staff.
“In the event of a strike, all CPS school buildings will remain open during their normal school hours to ensure students have a safe and welcoming place to spend the day and warm meals to eat,” the mayor and CPS chief Janice Jackson said in a joint announcement.
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They stressed they will also do “everything in our power to reach a fair deal that prevents a strike.”
In revealing the plan for a potential three-way walkout, CTU President Jesse Sharkey said: “The schools don’t work without all of us, and our unity is our strength.”
He added: “We prefer to reach a contract settlement without a strike. ... But I want no one in the city of Chicago to doubt our resolve. We mean to improve the conditions in our schools. We mean to achieve a fair contract.”
The CTU represents 25,000 teachers employed by one of the country’s largest school systems. But the threefold announcement Wednesday means that another 7,000 CPS workers — security guards, bus aides, special education classroom assistants and custodians — and about 2,500 employees of the Chicago Park District could also all end up on picket lines together.
Each of the three labor groups had already authorized separate strikes but had not set strike dates until Wednesday. The teachers could have decided to walk out as early as Monday, but decided to try to harness the collective power of a larger labor coalition.
[Most read] Rahm Emanuel raised taxes to get city worker pension funds on a ‘path to solvency.’ The shortfall still ballooned by $7 billion. »
“We are united with CTU and with workers standing up for themselves,” said Dian Palmer, president of Service Employees International Union Local 73, which represents both the parks workers and CPS support staff.
While the later date gives the teachers union and the city more time to settle their differences, it’s clear the two sides remain far apart, with both accusing the other of stalled responses to demands and offers.
Prior to Wednesday’s announcement, Lightfoot and officials in her administration again called on the teachers union to get a deal done without the disruption a strike would cause.
“I’m not naive about the complexities here. But I remain hopeful that if they come to the table in good faith, if they respond to our written offers that are out there, we’ll get a deal done,” the mayor said Wednesday. "And we should, because it’s in the best interests of our children and their families to get it done.”
The city’s immediate response to blunt the impact of a possible strike was its announcement that all school buildings in the system would remain open during any teacher and staff walkout. Regular instruction would not take place, but principals and non-union staff would be on hand “to greet students and ensure they have access to engaging activities,” CPS said in a letter to families. Transportation services will not be available, though.
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Charter and contract schools will maintain regular operations, officials said.
SEIU Local 73 Executive Vice President Jeffrey Howard acknowledged one reason the three units decided to set a joint strike date was because, in past teachers strikes, many parents send their children to park facilities.
This joint action, he said, “is about taking away that avenue and forcing (employers) to negotiate in good faith. ... They want to pit workers against each other."
Lightfoot said she wasn’t surprised to be facing all this labor pressure so soon after taking office. The writing was on the wall with the number of high-profile contract negotiations she walked into, she said.
Lightfoot’s administration and the Board of Education she selected, however, are facing a union whose rank-and-file members have indicated strong support for a walkout.
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A huge majority of CTU members — 94% — voted in favor last week of authorizing a strike.
The teachers union has stressed their demands not just on pay and benefits but also on a number of staffing issues, including more librarians, school nurses and social workers.
Leading up to the delegates’ meeting, Sharkey said Wednesday afternoon that the union’s “strategy is obvious. We’re trying to get the board to talk about these staffing issues.”
“I just think it, if the mayor’s point is we are not responding, let’s be clear: We are spending a lot of time at the table, putting a lot of energy into it,” he said.
But the city’s assertion that the union has been unresponsive to its offers was reiterated late Tuesday, with one of Lightfoot’s top negotiators expressing frustration that the CTU hadn’t yet provided the city a formal, written counter-proposal to its contract offers.
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The union hasn’t provided Lightfoot’s negotiators with anything in writing since Sept. 5, said Michael Frisch, a Lightfoot senior adviser who represents her at the bargaining table.
“As you know, we gave them a comprehensive offer on Friday. Again today we received nothing back in writing, which was disappointing because as you know, we are working hard from our side to present comprehensive offers to the CTU,” Frisch said. “We are very interested in getting a deal, reaching an agreement quickly and avoiding a strike that would be disruptive for our students and families. We’re not seeing that same level of urgency across the table.”
Sharkey countered Wednesday: "Our response to a number of the proposals is no. It’s not a very long response, but it’s a response. We are not interested in giving back rights that we won over the last contracts.”
The union hasn’t provided formal responses to the administration’s proposals but Frisch said they’ve brought clinicians, counselors and teachers to the table so the administration can hear their viewpoints. He called that a “useful discussion.”
“It’s helpful, but what we really need at this point is a comprehensive package offer for what it will take to get this resolved,” Frisch said. “We haven’t seen that yet.”
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Frisch stressed that, on Friday, CPS sweetened its offer by promising that a number of workers would immediately get raises under the deal. Health service nurses would immediately get an average 14% raise, while school clerks would be bumped up by at least 8% and teacher assistants would get 9% increases on average, Frisch said.
The city has also offered to keep health insurance costs for teachers unchanged for three years of a five-year pact and then raise them by less 0.75% over the last two years, Frisch said.
“This is a big deal, and I think it’s deserving of a serious response from the CTU,” Frisch said. “We’re still waiting for them.”
The city has also offered teachers 16% raises over a five-year contract, not including separate raises teachers received for each year of service. The CTU has asked for 15% over three years.
At CTU headquarters Wednesday after the joint strike announcement was made, labor leaders’ comments focused mainly on their groups’ unity. But they also took jabs at city officials.
[Most read] ‘Joker’ review: Joaquin Phoenix creates an interior world of pain. His movie is a pain, period. »
“I’ve a question for the mayor and the people who run the parks and schools: Do they feel guilty when they pay workers less than $20,000 a year?” Palmer, the SEIU local president, said.
Tribune reporter John Byrne contributed.
hleone@chicagotribune.com
gpratt@chicagotribune.com
Hannah Leone
Hannah Leone
Contact
Hannah Leone reports on Chicago Public Schools for the Tribune. She spent a year covering crime scenes overnight and previously covered breaking news and courts in the west suburbs. She worked at newspapers in Washington, Oregon and Idaho before joining the Tribune in 2016. She lives in Rogers Park, where she enjoys running along the lake.
 
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Chicago

kiwifarms.net
I figured most people here will think this is all a clown show. Illinois is an at will state. Bonus points is this is hyping up the strike that's potentially in a couple weeks. I might take pictures and post them up here. Feel free to give me some ideas on what I should upload. Obviously I'm not taking pictures of kids or cops. **Hint: How do I do upload to this site? Put on photobucket or something like that?

Good, then the gang members can shoot and kill the kids. Thus creating the savings to pay the teachers
I don't approve of violence but oh my god that's hilarious.

Thanks dumbdude42, for the archiving advice will keep that in mind next time.
 

Chicago

kiwifarms.net
I was from Illinois and from Downstate. So Chicago is like Cubed Illinois clown world to me
Fun fact guys there's a separatist movement to kick Chicago out of the state. I've lived here all my life and only learned about it months ago. I contacted the group to offer help but all they said was vote for pro-Illinois legislation. #losers

 

PowersOfPowers

kiwifarms.net
Illinois is a shithole state on par with California whose number one export is corruption. Chicago is the peak area for that corruption. Even if you necked all the admins and union bosses, there still wouldn't be money to pay these teachers more because the entire state and like half the municipalities and counties are dead broke. The state is dangerously close to being outright insolvent. Something like half of the public sector pensions in the state are underfunded by more than 50%. That's why widespread "Videogaming" (i.e. Slot Machines) is legal and probably one of the biggest reasons why they are legalizing weed next year. They need the money badly.

1570125168399.png


@Chicago, I've highlighted the relevant bits, but you can also just copy the photo and past it using ctrl+p
 

break these cuffs

This... celebration of incest is very crudely made
kiwifarms.net
Illinois is a shithole state on par with California whose number one export is corruption. Chicago is the peak area for that corruption. Even if you necked all the admins and union bosses, there still wouldn't be money to pay these teachers more because the entire state and like half the municipalities and counties are dead broke. The state is dangerously close to being outright insolvent. Something like half of the public sector pensions in the state are underfunded by more than 50%. That's why widespread "Videogaming" (i.e. Slot Machines) is legal and probably one of the biggest reasons why they are legalizing weed next year. They need the money badly.
Everything I've recently seen in the news about IL municipal financing has them taking from every pension plan they have access to with no plan on how to pay it back. It's crazy.
 

The 8 of Spades

Pay No Attention To The ♂ Behind The Glassy Smirk
kiwifarms.net
Fun fact guys there's a separatist movement to kick Chicago out of the state. I've lived here all my life and only learned about it months ago. I contacted the group to offer help but all they said was vote for pro-Illinois legislation. #losers

I am truly loving the fact that this is is spreading across the nation, the idea of kicking out what's basically a voting Mafia that refuses to let any other area in a state make choices. But yeah, democrat win in 2020 for sure you guys, can't you see how many people are trying to free themselves from the yoke of oppression thrust upon them by the Republicans Democrats.
 

Manwithn0n0men

kiwifarms.net
Everything I've recently seen in the news about IL municipal financing has them taking from every pension plan they have access to with no plan on how to pay it back. It's crazy.
They are the government, they dont need to pay it back

>Fun Fact

The State of Illinois is on a Blacklist for Fedex and UPS. (prob DHL as well). They wont deliever to any illinois government sites
 

Chicago

kiwifarms.net
^^
Source please...I'm crazy busy but that's crazy if true.

Illinois is a shithole state on par with California whose number one export is corruption. Chicago is the peak area for that corruption. Even if you necked all the admins and union bosses, there still wouldn't be money to pay these teachers more because the entire state and like half the municipalities and counties are dead broke. The state is dangerously close to being outright insolvent. Something like half of the public sector pensions in the state are underfunded by more than 50%. That's why widespread "Videogaming" (i.e. Slot Machines) is legal and probably one of the biggest reasons why they are legalizing weed next year. They need the money badly.

View attachment 957855

@Chicago, I've highlighted the relevant bits, but you can also just copy the photo and past it using ctrl+p
Dear diary...today I learned...

Holy shit! Thanks for that information! Very serious question I'm not super familiar with the pension laws but do you have to physically live in the state to collect? You can't just move otherwise you forfeit all the years accumulating? A buddy of mine wants to collect his city pension. He's still young but he doesn't know to never trust politicians. Half of me wants to dissuade him not to. The other half is "my buddy is going to do what he wants, might as well take care of yourself." I'm on the fence to tell him to leave the state.

Slightly off topic but very relevant to pension shenanigans the state pulls. Seriously Illville boys and girls on this forum we need to RUN not walk out of this state.

Holding kid's education hostage ... classic.

I know no one in the union would support this idea, but, maybe, they base teacher's pay on the median income of the neighborhoods they serve ? Even throw in pay increases if they do their jobs well ?
You pretty much answered your question. Problem is the union is a hive mind. I've read somewhere that teachers that still showed up to work to help kids were punished by the union. All this drama does is keep consolidating the union's power until the powder keg explodes. Biggest losers are the Chicagoans and side effect is if Chicago can't pay for it Illinois pays for it. Pretty much what PowersOfPowers says will probably happen (legalize weed and more casinos).

Mid October is ticking. I might show up to the protests and give you all exclusives....obviously well aware I can be doxxed but due to certain circumstances I might be moving out of Illinois soon. Just post up some ideas and I will be on the ground shooting pictures.
 
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