Everyday Feminism - aka Everyday Autism

Philosophy Zombie

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Everyday Feminism is a "magazine" (it resembles a blog much more, seeing as there's no evidence that there's an actual physical magazine or anything that you can buy, but I guess that just sounds better to them) that is basically Tumblr in longform, or alternatively what Jezebel or Gawker would be if they lost all remaining awareness that they are trashy tabloids and believed they were insightful think tanks at the bleeding edge of social justice.

They have the disagreeable, but unfortunately common habit of publishing absolute garbage as long as it agrees with their ideology, which can politely be described as "batshit motherfucking crazy".
I'm just gonna click on a random one. Oh, how about this? (I only skimmed it before putting it up here, so this will be fun? Maybe?)
Author’s Note: This article is written from a White, cisgender, straight male’s perspective – in other words, from my perspective. Throughout, I discuss primarily experiences and research involving cisgender men and women, but I must acknowledge the limitations of such a perspective. For more insight into trans, genderqueer, and non-binary perspectives, I encourage you to start with the work of Everyday Feminism contributing writers, Adrian Ballou and Kaylee Jakubowski (to name a couple).

"I know I'm a straight cis white man, and I'm really sorry about that. As a cis white man I know my article will be worse than everybody else's because of my privilege. You should really look at these articles that are made by proud trayuns wimmin instead of reading this one, which unfortunately was only written by widdle cis white male me. Again, forgive me for existing."

Hm. Usually clickbait articles don't begin with long-winded self-flagellation. I guess this is just how things are here.

Let me tell you a fascinating story:

Thirty minutes after waking up, I zipped to the school at which I teach and experienced a damn fine day of teaching. Upon my return home, I headed out for a run on an unseasonably warm March afternoon.

After a family dinner and tagging out of the bedtime routine for our four-year-old, I walked to a coffee shop, where I finally started this article, an achievement I rewarded with a short dose of Netflix.

What’s fascinating about this story has little to do with the less-than-scintillating ways I spent my time, but it has everything to do with the staggering display of male privilege this story reveals.

Let me break it down, starting with the alarm clock.
I'm pretty sure a woman could live out that day virtually identically. But educate me!

1. I Have the Privilege of a Short Morning Routine
(“Harp” alarm noise.)

To my obnoxious alarm, I lithely woke up, as the weight of an entire culture – male-dominated, market-driven – does not rest on my physical attractiveness.

Advertisements do not routinely divide my body into tiny increments and then proceed to me that each increment fails miserably (unless, of course, you buy some product).

They do not paste to the inside of my eyelids an unattainable image of beauty for my gender (that consists of a body type that only about 5% of women have – even fewer if you consider that this image is nearly exclusively White).

Because I can, for the most part, evade advertising that preys on and nurtures insecurities, I can sleep in and enjoy more time in the morning.

To perpetually tired and overworked women making ends meet, these privileges might trump the extra money I’m likely to make (according to one study, even my home – “liberal” Seattle – has one of the worst gender pay gaps of “50 major metropolitan areas in the US”).

I can roll out of bed, leave the house with my short hair still wet, and arrive to work at 8am, makeupless, shoving my shirt into my pants – without any repercussions.

In contrast, many women must meticulously ready themselves for the day.

Even the morning routines of some of business’ most powerful women, according to Forbes, include cooking breakfast for the family. (I wonder how many of 355 men on the Forbes 400 Richest Americans list integrate into their morning routine a round of eggs for the family.)

At the 2015 Golden Globes, Tina Fey called out the unfairness of such imbalanced routines:

“Steve Carrell’s Foxcatcher look took two hours to put on, including his hairstyling and makeup. Just for comparison, it took me three hours today to prepare for my roles as human woman.”
I love how all of these articles just assume that all women are forced to wear a TV prep-level of makeup every day. Believe it or not, a lot of women like taking a few minutes to do their makeup because they enjoy looking nice! Crazy, right!? Anyway I pretty much can't be bothered to wear it, and I haven't had the Patriarchy come knocking at my door yet (I'm a girl, I don't give a shit if people "misgendur me" but I've seen people refer to me as a dude so just putting that out there). Maybe it will eventually. If the writer is to be believed, it's always watching.

That's not to say that women who wear makeup and therefore are more attractive don't see advantages in a lot of areas because they do. Handsome men get a lot of the same advantages over more unattractive men—not going into sluthate twisted maxilla territory, but just saying the good-looking guy might be better off than the fat dumpy guy who smells. Sometimes physical attractiveness can even be a disadvantage.

2. I Have the Privilege of a Gender That Confers Authority
I work damn hard at teaching, and such dedication certainly accounted for much of my “damn fine day of teaching” that day in March. But hard work is rarely, if ever, the sole driver of any success story.

Long before students reach my classroom, they have been trained for the past 17-18 years to think of my gender as the authority.

They might have learned it at an early age when assertive girls were smacked down with labels like “bossy” – a reality that recently spurred the Ban Bossy campaign.

They might have learned it from watching media that rampantly objectifies women, often blurring the line between mainstream media and pornography.

They might have learned it from consistently seeing men overrepresented and women underrepresented in positions of power.

And I benefit from all of these lessons as a male teacher.

(Heck, it wouldn’t surprise me if male teachers were the original mansplainers, as men dominated the field long before women replaced them as far cheaper labor.)

And the research confirms my upgraded status as Mr. (not Ms.) Greenberg.

A New York Times column reports that women professors are rated consistently lower than male professors, based on a study of 14 million reviews on RateMyProfessors.com.

Another study of online courses – in which men and women professors gave erroneous genders – led to similar results: Teachers with male names consistently came out on top.

On the topic of work, I also have the privilege of evading scrutiny of my work-life balance, a luxury that even celebrities like Jennifer Garner are unable to enjoy.

Garner recounts constantly being asked about how she manages motherhood and acting, while her husband, actor Ben Affleck, instead gets asked about the “tits” of one of his much younger co-stars.

Considering the majority of teachers pre-university are female, you'd think it would be the opposite way, but I'll give him this one because I don't know enough to argue his point. The fun part is just coming up anyway.

3. I Have the Privilege of Peeing Standing Up
Between my two-hour classes, I needed to pee – an urge, I’m told by female colleagues, that a penis is able to keep at bay longer (yet another privilege, though physiological and cisgender-specific, to add to the list).

An open urinal or stall was waiting for me, as always.

Such availability is not the norm for many women’s bathrooms, a fact I learned in the late nineties at an Ani Difranco concert – when dozens of women stormed the near-empty men’s bathroom – and one I often see confirmed in airports and sporting events.

Pee privilege also extends to the outdoors, as it’s not uncommon to see men urinating in public.

While doing so is generally frowned upon – Hamburg’s nightclub district has even invested in urine-repellent paint to discourage the practice – many men still fire away.

I know I do from time to time during my longer runs. But is my ability to dash behind a girthy tree to urinate in an upright position, at least mostly hidden from passersby, simply another physiological advantage?

Or have we just accidentally tinkled on more evidence of a patriarchal culture?

While studying abroad in Kenya, I routinely took long bus trips during which the side of the road was used as rest stops. I routinely witnessed both men and women pee on the side of the road.

Yes, the women wore dresses and sarongs that concealed their lower regions, and, no, I am not arguing that Kenya represents the pinnacle of gender equality.

Nevertheless, women squatting to pee in public can be a cultural norm. Just not for American women.

Thus, here in the US, not only do men have the physiological luxury of holding it longer, they also have the patriarchal privilege of releasing it sooner.

look, here's the wonderful snark-fest you've been waiting so patiently for!

Most people would use this opportunity to start talking more about the wage gap or something, but instead you have decided that women having to take two extra minutes to piss is the foremost gender issue of our generation. You truly are the Susan B. Anthony of the 21st century.

"It's not uncommon to see men urinating in public."

You must live in a trailer park where no one wears a shirt. Anyone who pees in public is incontinent or very drunk. A man walking with friends who suddenly proclaims "Excuse me, mind if I walk over to the curb so I can wring it?" is going to lose them pretty quickly.

"While studying abroad in Kenya, I routinely took long bus trips during which the side of the road was used as rest stops. I routinely witnessed both men and women pee on the side of the road."


O Africa! O glorious land where the People's bladders are free, and unsullied by the lavatories and johns of the white man!

That's my first verse anyway. I'm working on this. Thank you for acknowledging my gift as a poet.

I don't even have to say this, but the concept of urethral privilege is fucking hilarious. I am not sure exactly what intoxicating substance the author used, but it had to be some good shit. Oh wait, I'm pretty sure it's called male guilt.

I'll stop now. That was too easy. Normally I expect to have to use my centers of higher thought on some level to mock an article, but as a person who is not normally described as "fun at parties" it was way too easy to come up with jokes. I would say this was definitely satire if I didn't know better.

4. I Have the Privilege to Show Skin
Having finished teaching and feeling an uncharacteristically warm breeze through the classroom window, I bolted home as early as I could.

On this March day, the temperature broke into the 70s, possibly for the first time in 2015. Not unlike that one Portlandia skit mocking sun-deprived Pacific Northwesterners, I did what any runner would do: I took off my shirt during my run.

Except that not everyone can – not without breaking laws and attracting unwelcome attention (not to mention harassment and even violence).

My nipples, as wonderful as they are, apparently pose far less of a threat than women’s nipples.

This unequal nipple treatment has led to nipple activism – two words I don’t commonly associate with each other.

Yet the #FreetheNipple campaign is gaining traction, as many – from an Icelandic teenager to comedian Chelsea Handler – refuse to house their nipples in the kitchen of undergarments any longer.

Trained for so many years to view women’s breasts as near-magical vessels of sexual arousal, I confess that I struggle in retraining my brain for this paradigm shift.

But I know that I can contemplate the shift shirtless in public without repercussion.

A topless woman would unlikely feel safe to do so.

Another one I will have to give him because it is a little unfair that it's illegal for women to go topless. Women exercising in sports bras aren't an uncommon sight at all though.

5. I Have the Privilege to Move About Without Fear of Harassment, Assault, or Rape
After (barely) winning the nightly pajama struggle with my four-year-old, I left my family for a coffee shop at 8:15 pm, long after sunset, and traveled one-and-a-half miles along Seattle streets, many of which were poorly lit.

I did not once consider the possibility of street harassment or violence. Even the sight of a shadowy figure on the sidewalk ahead didn’t elevate my heart rate.

Women rarely share this privilege, regardless of the time of day.

According to a study conducted by the advocacy group Stop Street Harassment, 65% of women have experienced street harassment “at some point in their lives.”

Of those women, 41% reported that the harassment included “being followed, touched, flashed, or forced to do something sexual.”

In smaller numbers, men also experience such harassment, but very few of them are straight men like me.

street-harassment.png


And how does law enforcement treat crimes that primarily target women?

Ask Julia Marquand from Seattle, and you’ll likely get a very negative response. She took a picture of the man who groped her, and when she showed it to the police, the cops dismissed it.

So Marquand turned to social media, posting his picture on Twitter and subsequently attracting a fair amount of media attention, enough that other women came forward with similar stories about the man pictured.

That’s what it took to finally get this man arrested in the fall of 2014.

If Marquand’s story is sobering, then the recently released report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should keep you on the wagon indefinitely:

It revealed that one in five women in the United States has been raped or had experienced an attempted rape. (For a visual of what such a number per year looks like, see this graphic by Vox.)

But this 20% figure obscures the disproportionate crimes that many women of Color face: “51.7% of American Indian or Alaskan Native women, 51.3% of multiracial women, and 41.2% of black women are violently abused by an intimate partner at some point.”

The Gender, Violence, and Resource Access Survey shows that transgender people also face similarly high rates: 50% of transgender people have been “raped or assaulted by a romantic partner.”

And let’s not forget the roles class and nationality can play. Rates of rape for girls and women crossing into the United States from Central America run as high as 80%.

In contrast, men are so privileged that they don’t even have to know what rape means. One study found that many men – 32% – didn’t know that “[forcing] a women to [have] sexual intercourse” counts as rape.
People not giving a damn when a woman is assaulted? Isn't it often the opposite case when a man accused of rape will never have a clean slate again even when he's proven not guilty?

Anyway while it is true that women have a higher rate of sexual harassment, that doesn't mean that all or most women live in constant fear of rape. I also bet that the graph didn't take into account that harassment of men is underreported, perhaps even moreso than female harassment.

And just saying, it's an interesting grammatical choice he's making when he capitalizes the "color" in "women of color". It's like he thinks of all nonwhites as the Assorted Nonspecific Coalition And/or Nation of Brown People Who Are All Similar And Never Have Any Opposing Interests.

6. I Have the Privilege to Enjoy the Internet Without My Gender Being Assaulted
Once I arrived at the café, following a walk during which nobody asked me to smile, I got to work writing and researching. Like the streets, the Internet is another realm through which I’m free to travel without attacks on my gender.

And I have met a few Internet critics in my time, from White Supremacists to trolls with a Sith-like attraction to the Star Wars trilogies.

Yet not one of these attacks targeted my gender.

Sure, White Supremacists took note of my Jewish last name, but they omitted derogatory comments about my appearance. They didn’t once threaten me with rape.

In contrast, many women face such attacks on a regular basis. But don’t take my word for it. Learn more here and here.

Or ask Ashley Judd, whose tweet about a college basketball game – a fucking basketball game – led to an online onslaught of sexism: “bitch,” whore,” “the c-word,” and threats of rape.

Or learn more about the work of Anita Sarkeesian, who has dedicated her life to eradicating the rampant sexism in video games and gaming culture – but don’t expect to read any YouTube comments for her video web series.

They had to be disabled because of what she describes as a “massive online hate campaign.”
Anita Sarkeesian is apparently a poor oppressed woman who just wanted to eradicate sexism in gaming, and she was FORCED to disable comments for her own safety! Well, if that story is the one that gives you more comfort, then okay.

Speaking of which, did you know insulting people on the internet is a HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATION?

7. I Have the Privilege of Seeing Myself Widely and Positively Represented in the Media
Tired from a long day that included teaching, running, family-ing, and writing, I treated myself to some Netflix time while the rest of the household slept.

Scrolling through the Netflix queue, protagonists of my gender abounded. Not just of my gender, but of my gender and age (42).

Women, on the other hand, tend to disappear as protagonists when they reach my age.

The Huffington Post reports that a woman’s average salary in Hollywood steadily increases until she hits the ancient age of 34, at which point it “drops off rapidly.”

The peak salary for men extends to the age of 51, so I have a few years before the media makes me feel devalued and unimportant.

With media whistleblowers like the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and Jennifer Siebel Newsom’s The Representation Project, such gender-based discrepancies and sexism have been widely documented and exposed, but they persist, nevertheless.

Which is precisely why I was going to get to sleep later the next morning than most women also due to start work by 8:00am
I don't feel "devalued" by the media because I don't base my personal self-worth on sitcoms. It's actually a bit disconcerting that you seem to.

Just using imdb's search feature for 10 seconds I found 53 movies and TV episodes with the tag "middle aged woman". So not exactly unheard of. It does suck that older actresses tend to earn less. Still, the fact that they nonetheless earn much more than most of us ever will prevents me from feeling that sorry for them.

And you used HuffPost to get your women's issues news? It's the American left-wing version of the Daily Mail. It's okay sometimes when it's reporting actual news, but it shouldn't be trusted for anything opinionated.

tl;dr there were 2 points where the guy didn't totally fuck up and in the rest it was either maybe he had a point somewhere but it got overshadowed by his incredibly overt white guilt and his shame at being a man or it was complete laughable bullshit of the highest order

To clarify, I did not pick this one out for how bad it is; I've read plenty of EF's stuff and this is normal for them. Saying that women not being able to take a piss in public is male privilege is not that weird by their standards.

And you thought that a website called Everyday Feminism would be about, like, equality, or something. *yawn*
 
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Philosophy Zombie

Mekotur's favorite
True & Honest Fan
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An oldy but a goody. http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/03/12-good-fatty-archetypes/ I'm pretty sure of it, anyway. I basically lost it at "Good Fatty" and stopped reading.

The words are ass-tiny, boring, and tl;dr, but the pictures on their own tell quite a strange and intriguing story.

upload_2015-5-8_18-44-41.png
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(Comparing fat people to large animals seems to be a recurring theme. Maybe next we'll get to see a whale!)
upload_2015-5-8_18-54-4.png
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(I'm guessing the author thinks of herself as a "Rad Fatty").
 

niggers

GOT A FEELING I CAN'T SHAKE IT
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I Have the Privilege of a Short Morning Routine

that's called the "i'm a shithead who doesn't care about my appearance" privilege

you guys don't even know, my morning routine consists of 3 different moisturizers, a scrub, a blackhead remover, an aftershave, the weekly facial peel, wax for my eyebrows, argan oil and a gel for my jewish-born-completely-unmanageable hair along with about 6 different pills that are allegedly keeping me healthy - that's all after shaving. oh, and eye drops so i don't look constantly stoned (i work night shift a lot).

can we please get rid of this bullshit idea that only women care about looking good? i work hard to be beautiful dammit.
 
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Android raptor

"an honest-to-God BPD womanchild misanthrope"
kiwifarms.net
Joined
May 25, 2013
I know far too many people who repost articles from this site in earnesty:heart-empty:

What even is the point of it anyway? Jezebel, XOjane, the Mary Sue, feministing, etc already exist. Why the need for yet another sjw circlejerk parroting the exact same bullshit as everywhere else?
that's called the "i'm a shithead who doesn't care about my appearance" privilege

you guys don't even know, my morning routine consists of 3 different moisturizers, a scrub, a blackhead remover, an aftershave, the weekly facial peel, wax for my eyebrows, argan oil and a gel for my jewish-born-completely-unmanageable hair along about 6 different pills that are allegedly keeping me healthy - that's all after shaving. oh, and eye drops so i don't look constantly stoned (i work night shift a lot).

can we please get rid of this bullshit idea that only women care about looking good? i work hard to be beautiful dammit.
Unless I'm going to a con or something else that requires dressing up my morning routine takes maaaaybe 30 minutes, with most of that spent showering. I'm the foulest of bachlorette frogs.

Meanwhile the cis male roommate hog the bathroom for at least 45 minutes it seems like, because he does this fancy shaving thing and shit.

Its like these people have never interacted with real people and formed their knowelege of societal norms solely from stereotypes in bad shows and movies.
 
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Chipmunk With A Banana

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Feb 1, 2015
Everyday Feminism is a "magazine" (it resembles a blog much more, seeing as there's no evidence that there's an actual physical magazine or anything that you can buy, but I guess that just sounds better to them) that is basically Tumblr in longform, or alternatively what Jezebel or Gawker would be if they lost all remaining awareness that they are trashy tabloids and believed they were insightful think tanks at the bleeding edge of social justice.

They have the disagreeable, but unfortunately common habit of publishing absolute garbage as long as it agrees with their ideology, which can politely be described as "batshit motherfucking crazy".
I'm just gonna click on a random one. Oh, how about this? (I only skimmed it before putting it up here, so this will be fun? Maybe?)


"I know I'm a straight cis white man, and I'm really sorry about that. As a cis white man I know my article will be worse than everybody else's because of my privilege. You should really look at these articles that are made by proud trayuns wimmin instead of reading this one, which unfortunately was only written by widdle cis white male me. Again, forgive me for existing."

Hm. Usually clickbait articles don't begin with long-winded self-flagellation. I guess this is just how things are here.


I'm pretty sure a woman could live out that day virtually identically. But educate me!


I love how all of these articles just assume that all women are forced to wear a TV prep-level of makeup every day. Believe it or not, a lot of women like taking a few minutes to do their makeup because they enjoy looking nice! Crazy, right!? Anyway I pretty much can't be bothered to wear it, and I haven't had the Patriarchy come knocking at my door yet (I'm a girl, I don't give a shit if people "misgendur me" but I've seen people refer to me as a dude so just putting that out there). Maybe it will eventually. If the writer is to be believed, it's always watching.

That's not to say that women who wear makeup and therefore are more attractive don't see advantages in a lot of areas because they do. Handsome men get a lot of the same advantages over more unattractive men—not going into sluthate twisted maxilla territory, but just saying the good-looking guy might be better off than the fat dumpy guy who smells. Sometimes physical attractiveness can even be a disadvantage.



Considering the majority of teachers pre-university are female, you'd think it would be the opposite way, but I'll give him this one because I don't know enough to argue his point. The fun part is just coming up anyway.



look, here's the wonderful snark-fest you've been waiting so patiently for!

Most people would use this opportunity to start talking more about the wage gap or something, but instead you have decided that women having to take two extra minutes to piss is the foremost gender issue of our generation. You truly are the Susan B. Anthony of the 21st century.

"It's not uncommon to see men urinating in public."

You must live in a trailer park where no one wears a shirt. Anyone who pees in public is incontinent or very drunk. A man walking with friends who suddenly proclaims "Excuse me, mind if I walk over to the curb so I can wring it?" is going to lose them pretty quickly.

"While studying abroad in Kenya, I routinely took long bus trips during which the side of the road was used as rest stops. I routinely witnessed both men and women pee on the side of the road."


O Africa! O glorious land where the People's bladders are free, and unsullied by the lavatories and johns of the white man!

That's my first verse anyway. I'm working on this. Thank you for acknowledging my gift as a poet.

I don't even have to say this, but the concept of urethral privilege is fucking hilarious. I am not sure exactly what intoxicating substance the author used, but it had to be some good shit. Oh wait, I'm pretty sure it's called male guilt.

I'll stop now. That was too easy. Normally I expect to have to use my centers of higher thought on some level to mock an article, but as a person who is not normally described as "fun at parties" it was way too easy to come up with jokes. I would say this was definitely satire if I didn't know better.



Another one I will have to give him because it is a little unfair that it's illegal for women to go topless. Women exercising in sports bras aren't an uncommon sight at all though.


People not giving a damn when a woman is assaulted? Isn't it often the opposite case when a man accused of rape will never have a clean slate again even when he's proven not guilty?

Anyway while it is true that women have a higher rate of sexual harassment, that doesn't mean that all or most women live in constant fear of rape. I also bet that the graph didn't take into account that harassment of men is underreported, perhaps even moreso than female harassment.

And just saying, it's an interesting grammatical choice he's making when he capitalizes the "color" in "women of color". It's like he thinks of all nonwhites as the Assorted Nonspecific Coalition And/or Nation of Brown People Who Are All Similar And Never Have Any Opposing Interests.


Anita Sarkeesian is apparently a poor oppressed woman who just wanted to eradicate sexism in gaming, and she was FORCED to disable comments for her own safety! Well, if that story is the one that gives you more comfort, then okay.

Speaking of which, did you know insulting people on the internet is a HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATION?


I don't feel "devalued" by the media because I don't base my personal self-worth on sitcoms. It's actually a bit disconcerting that you seem to.

Just using imdb's search feature for 10 seconds I found 53 movies and TV episodes with the tag "middle aged woman". So not exactly unheard of. It does suck that older actresses tend to earn less. Still, the fact that they nonetheless earn much more than most of us ever will prevents me from feeling that sorry for them.

And you used HuffPost to get your women's issues news? It's the American left-wing version of the Daily Mail. It's okay sometimes when it's reporting actual news, but it shouldn't be trusted for anything opinionated.

tl;dr there were 2 points where the guy didn't totally fuck up and in the rest it was either maybe he had a point somewhere but it got overshadowed by his incredibly overt white guilt and his shame at being a man or it was complete laughable bullshit of the highest order

To clarify, I did not pick this one out for how bad it is; I've read plenty of EF's stuff and this is normal for them. Saying that women not being able to take a piss in public is male privilege is not that weird by their standards.

And you thought that a website called Everyday Feminism would be about, like, equality, or something. *yawn*


Daym! I never knew how good I have it as a white straight male! This is going to brighten up my mood immensely from now on!
 

Sweet and Savoury

Null-like homunculus
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Joined
May 25, 2013
Wikipedia is becoming pretty suspect as a source on cultural or social issues. It's neutrality is definitely been questioned as too many of the senior editors are SJWs or lean in that direction.

Just check out the GamerGate article or the page of anyone of the females involved in it for chuckles.

Does Wu really deserve a wiki page? Really? And such a glowing one too.
 

Saney

Slayer of the Love-Shys
Retired Staff
True & Honest Fan
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Feb 3, 2013
Wikipedia is becoming pretty suspect as a source on cultural or social issues. It's neutrality is definitely been questioned as too many of the senior editors are SJWs or lean in that direction.

Just check out the GamerGate article or the page of anyone of the females involved in it for chuckles.

Does Wu really deserve a wiki page? Really? And such a glowing one too.

Let's vandalise it.

I'm kidding...probably.
 

A Ghost

closeted sociopath and a classy ghost
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
that is kinda the issue with wikipedia's anyone can edit police it can lead to alot of people with the same idea circlejerking and getting angry when people try to edit it
also this is my new favorite face ever it looks like links for wind waker went derpy
 

ChameleonBody

whatever
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
I mentioned this a long time ago in the SJW thread but there's an insidious little article on this site that I see being thrown around by Facebook cretins called "The Difference Between Cultural Appropriation and Cultural Exchange." For such a direct-sounding title, it's 90% waffling on about muh feels and 10% of content stating that it's cultural appropriation if it is "an exercise in privilege." So, pretty much the most completely meaningless phrase ever which means that anything can be cultural appropriation if it makes someone feel bad about muh oppression.

I don't know if I've said it before but cultural appropriation is my least favorite of the many ludicrous SJW ideas and it was the first one to really make me decide "yeah, fuck these guys." I used to think of myself as a really multicultural person. For example, I moved into the international dorm of my campus. Shame that "multiculturalism" has gone from expressing love for and engaging with other cultures to hating yourself for doing so. (:_(

Anyway, joke of a site.
 
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