FUCK CHINA: General - The tide is turning.

Jimmy Durante's Ballsack

Spooky ghost avatar ooOoooO
kiwifarms.net
I forgot about this topic. Was pretty drunk when I made it. So now that I'm sober, maybe I should weigh in with a clear head.

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:stickup:FUCK CHINA.
:eli3:
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I would make it a scrolling marquee if I could.
 

Legoshi

18 year old grey wolf high school dropout
kiwifarms.net
This is small-time. When ASF struck, some villagers burned pigs alive in pits. Warning: traumatising content.
It's so sad to see how the events of the 50s and 60s in China have completely destroyed the fabric of traditional Chinese culture and the values of compassion. You can see it in so many Chinese people's attitudes nowadays. Combined with the entitled nationalism and victimhood, it creates an ugly attitude.



I love seeing Huashit (CCP spyware) getting completely decimated and ruined. I hope other shady Chinese tech companies like Lenovo (which is owned by a Chinese-state operated institution) get banned as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAffWwL1E-Q Noooo, we aren't Chinese-state owned! We have to tell you guys! Also, we get funding from the government! We're totally NOT linked with the CCP guys!

It's ironic that China claims Taiwan is theirs but they constantly harass them and keep threating to invade them and prepare to do so. Why go through all those measures if it's your "province"? That's like saying you own something, but you constantly keep lending it from someone.🤷‍♂️
 
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bot_for_hire

kiwifarms.net

Pakistani militants opposing Belt and Road kill 14 security men

An ambush killed 14 security personnel in a convoy escorting staffers of the Oil and Gas Development Co. Ltd. (OGDCL) on a coastal highway in Pakistan's Gwadar district on Thursday.

The employees of OGDCL, Pakistan's largest company in terms of market capitalization, had been carrying out a seismic survey to discover gas in the 2,407-sq.-km Gwadar block. The attack took place in the Sarpat area, 300 kilometers to the east of the port of Gwadar.

According to Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), the media wing of the Pakistani armed forces, those killed in the attack were seven personnel from the Frontier Corps paramilitary force and seven security guards for OGDCL. "Security Forces responded effectively, ensured security of the OGDCL persons, and managed their safe exit from the area," an ISPR statement said.

Baloch Raji Ajoi Sangar, an alliance of militant ethnic Baloch separatist groups, claimed responsibility for the attack. The same group attacked the Pakistan Stock Exchange in June 2020 and had warned China to stop working on Belt and Road projects in the restive southwestern province of Baluchistan.

This attack took place a couple of days after Pakistan's national security adviser, Moeed Yusuf, in an interview accused India of bankrolling terrorism in Pakistan.

James M. Dorsey, a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies at Singapore, told Nikkei Asia, "Indian support to Baloch separatists can't be ruled out, but this militancy is a homegrown problem possibly exploited by foreign actors." He added that Baloch people have not benefited from China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) projects and hence oppose them.

Experts believe this attack will further increase the challenges for Pakistan to protect CPEC, a $50 billion Pakistan component of the Belt and Road Initiative.

Michael Kugelman, deputy director of the Asia program at the Wilson Center in Washington, believes this attack will reinforce the anxieties of Islamabad and Beijing about the security of CPEC projects. "Beijing has shown a willingness -- not just in Pakistan, but in other volatile areas of the world as well -- to tolerate a fair amount of risk when making investments in insecure spaces," he told Nikkei, adding that Thursday's attack underscores that for all the talk of CPEC's financial challenges, its security risks continue to loom large as well.

Malik Siraj Akbar, a South Asia analyst based in Washington, says attacks like this are tarnishing Gwadar's brand, highlighted by the Pakistani government as a place where investors could feel safe. Baloch insurgents "are using such attacks to gain support from the locals by giving them the impression that they are defending Gwadar's economic potential, from which the local population does not seem to be benefiting yet," he told Nikkei.

Given the security threats posed by Baloch separatists, Islamabad has beefed up security for the CPEC projects, but this does not seem to have stemmed attacks on economic targets.

Kugelman believes that Islamabad has proved incapable of squelching the threat posed by Baloch separatists. "With indications that different insurgent groups are now uniting to fight against CPEC projects, this threat stands to get even bigger. Islamabad has its work cut out for itself," he told Nikkei.

Akbar is of the view that there is little Pakistan can accomplish through increasing or decreasing security forces, saying Pakistan has to address the issue through peaceful talks with the Baloch nationalists and give the local people a share in the CPEC projects.

Although continued attacks in and around Gwadar have created a sense of insecurity and increased the security costs of CPEC projects, experts believe they will not deter China from continuing to work on crucial Belt and Road projects.

"This [attack] will result in an increase in Chinese pressure on Pakistan to provide more security, but so far Beijing has not shown any indication to withdraw from CPEC projects in Gwadar as a consequence of such attacks," said Dorsey. He added, however, that attacks resulting in Chinese casualties could change Beijing's position.
 
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horrorfan89

Resident Master of the dark and all things macabre
kiwifarms.net
I once saw a webm of a chinaman pinning a dog down to the floor and punching it on the head until it bled from the nose.

So yeah, fuck China.
The hood niggas in my town do that to all kinds of helpless animals. Every night I hear the screams of stray cats getting suffocated by their big air jordan clad feet.

Huh makes me wonder why they hate each other so much since they have something in common
 

Legoshi

18 year old grey wolf high school dropout
kiwifarms.net
On the reviews about Chinese phones on how great and cheap they are, don't they realize why they might be so cheap? They probably did some copying and espionage from other countries because China has no copyright laws, thus bootlegs are everywhere there.
 

DamageJoy

kiwifarms.net
I don't hate China, but I am disappointed that the main challenger to the US consumerist Mc culture is a cheap copy of said consumerist Mc culture.
So state enforced homosexuality or state enforced freemium mobile games. Bad future awaits.

The Soviet Union at least was cool. China doesn't even has that factor.
 

bot_for_hire

kiwifarms.net

Hong Kong protester 'Grandma Wong’: I was held in mainland China for 14 months

An elderly woman who disappeared midway through Hong Kong’s democracy protests last year has resurfaced in the financial hub after 14 months away, saying she had been detained on the Chinese mainland.

Alexandra Wong said on Saturday she was forced to renounce her activism in writing, record a video statement saying she was not tortured, and sent on a “patriotic tour” of the country’s north.

Called “Grandma Wong” by her fellow activists and often spotted waving a British flag, the 64-year-old attended virtually every rally during the early days of the movement for greater democracy and police accountability, which kicked off in June 2019.

She disappeared in August last year and maintained only sporadic contact with local media in the former British colony.

On Saturday she held a media conference in Hong Kong and said that, after joining an August protest, she was detained by Chinese police at the border with Shenzhen, the mainland metropolis where she has lived for 14 years.

Her testimony was a vivid illustration of the opaque, party-controlled judicial system on the mainland that many Hongkongers fear is one day coming to their city.

Wong said she was held by Shenzhen authorities for “administrative detention” and “criminal detention” for a total of 45 days, without knowing what charges she was facing. “I was afraid I would die in the detention centre,” she said.

When her stay in custody was over, she was asked to face a camera and declare that she had not been tortured by mainland authorities, and promise not to take media interviews or protest again.

She was asked to confess in writing that her activism had been wrong. “The worst thing I did in my life is to write that confession ... but I had nothing to bargain with,” she said.

The confessions did not win her freedom immediately. She was later sent on a five-day “patriotic tour” of Shaanxi province, where she had her picture taken holding the Chinese flag, and sang the national anthem.

After that, she was told she would be released on bail pending trial for “picking quarrels and provoking trouble” – a catch-all term used by the government to target dissenters. But she was given no written documents on the charges.

For a year after her release on bail, she was allowed to go only to her home in Shenzhen, and could not return to Hong Kong. Those conditions lapsed in late September.

“I have no courage to step in Shenzhen again, at least for now, unless there is a radical change in the political situation,” Wong told reporters.

After huge and often violent democracy protests that convulsed Hong Kong last year, Beijing launched a crackdown on its opponents in the semi-autonomous city.

In late June, it also imposed a broadly worded security law that, among other restrictions, outlawed the expression of certain views.

“I won’t give up fighting,” Wong said. “After all, there will be sacrifice, otherwise ... the authoritarian system wouldn’t be changed.”
 

bot_for_hire

kiwifarms.net

China Scholars Hit Out at New Zealand University Over Probe of Professor

Dozens of academics and experts on China have hit out at a New Zealand university for its investigation of Anne-Marie Brady, a university professor who publicized links between the country's universities and Chinese state interests.

The University of Canterbury has said it is investigating complaints against Brady from universities and individuals linked to a report she submitted to the New Zealand parliament in July.

Brady, who is also a fellow at the Wilson Center in Washington DC, has been called before an internal disciplinary body after complaints were made about the research paper.

"We are concerned she may lose her job," her lawyer Stephen Franks told the Australian Financial Review. "This matter says it is now apparently OK to seek disciplinary action against a fellow academic whose research you don't agree with."

The report, titled "Holding a Pen in One Hand, Gripping a Gun in the Other," was submitted to the Justice Select Committee of the New Zealand parliament in July.

Co-authored by Jichang Lulu and Sam Pheloung, it details links between New Zealand universities and tech companies, and the Chinese state, including the paramilitary bingtuan in the northwestern region of Xinjiang.

In an open letter addressed to University of Canterbury vice chancellor Cheryl de la Rey and deputy vice chancellor Ian Wright, more than 150 international scholars and experts on China hit out at Wright's comments to the media after the complaints were made.

"We are shocked to read that your Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Ian Wright, gave a statement to the press confirming that the University was entertaining the complaints, and giving them currency by explaining that they allege that the paper contains 'manifest errors of fact and misleading inferences'," the letter said.

"We, who know this area, can see no manifest errors or misleading inferences based on the evidenced material provided in the report," the letter said, adding that some of the scholars had reexamined the paper after the complaints were reported and found nothing wrong with it.

The letter said Brady had conducted ground-breaking research on the Chinese Communist Party's United Front influence program overseas.

"[Her work] has had a profound impact internationally based as it is on meticulous research and her analytical insights over 20 years of scholarship in this area," it said, calling for further explanation or clarification of the university's position.

Brady has stopped making public comments pending the investigation, the New Zealand news site Stuff.co.nz quoted her lawyer Stephen Franks as saying.

"[Professor Brady] has been the target of a harassment campaign and threatening menace because of the serious implications of her important research," the letter said, calling for an immediate apology from the university.

It said the normal method of recording a disagreement with an academic paper was to publish a critical response, not to subject the writer to an investigation.

"We know of no valid basis for any 'review' of Professor Brady’s work other than by her peers and other researchers and commentators, as is normal for academic research and publication," the letter said.

Hatchet man

Anders Corr, who publishes the Journal of Political Risk and Principal at Corr Analytics, said Wright, an underwater volcano expert, had no expertise in Chinese politics, and was less qualified to comment on Brady's work than the people who signed the letter.

"Yet Professor Brady, who is an expert, is not allowed to respond to his public charges per a legal gag by the university," Corr said via his Twitter account.

"In effect Ian Wright is a hatchet man smearing Professor Brady's good name while apparently looking for an excuse to fire her for a paper that points out an inconvenient truth: New Zealand's government and universities are in bed with China's military and could very well be violating domestic and international law."

Franks told Stuff.co.nz: "We are still trying to work out exactly what she must answer. We want to know how the review is a legitimate exercise of the university’s authority."

According to Brady's paper, Auckland University has links to China’s Northwestern Polytechnical University in Xi'an, which is involved in R&D for weapons and military equipment, as well as with Peking University, which specializes in military research.

An Auckland University spokeswoman said there was no evidence that its staff members, students or visiting academics had unlawfully transferred University of Auckland research or technology to China.

"In China, as in the U.S. and most Western countries, it is common for universities to receive research funding from agencies connected with defense departments in their countries or elsewhere," she told Stuff.co.nz.

Victoria University, which was named in Brady's report alongside Massey University and Brady's own Canterbury University, said "strict protocols" were in place around "potentially sensitive technology areas."

In comments to Stuff.co.nz, Massey, which has ties to bingtuan-linked Shihezi University in Xinjiang, where the authorities are holding some 1.5 million ethnic minority Uyghurs in detention camps, lauded its own reputation for collaboration with Chinese institutions, saying it complied with government advice and undertook "an enormous amount" of risk assessment.

It said it had no control over what its students did once they left the university.
 

bot_for_hire

kiwifarms.net
What sort of science fiction does Xi Jinping like? How can China’s weathermen use the president’s political philosophy to improve their forecasts? In what ways can “Xi Thought” help prepare the country for the next big earthquake?

These are the sorts of questions Communist Party cadres are now pondering as they prepare for the next big milestone in the president’s effort to cement his control: Elevating Xi Thought alongside Maoism. The esoteric concept is expected to be written into the five-year development blueprint that will be unveiled after party meetings later this month. Everyone from diplomats to executives to sci-fi writers are under pressure to incorporate the broad, often fuzzy tenets of Xi Thought into their policies.
(...)
The China Meteorological Administration was found in August to have some gaps to bridge in applying Xi’s idea of domestic and international situations into their work while the China Earthquake Administration got wrapped for not fully reflecting Xi’s Thought into their disaster prevention work. Writers and producers in the nation’s burgeoning science fiction scene were urged by an official industry association to take Xi Thought on board and transform China into a sci-fi powerhouse.


'Xi Thought' creeping into everything from Chinese sci-fi to company filings
 
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Legoshi

18 year old grey wolf high school dropout
kiwifarms.net

Even though a lot of Western leaders haven't done a good job, I'm very sceptical about how the media is saying that China has "recovered". You don't know what they're hiding. How? By lying about the coronavirus, locking up citizens in their homes, covering up cases while they have their eye on attacking other nations such as Taiwan, India, Japan, and the nations of the South China Sea. The CCP are using this virus to get away with causing issues.

We should be looking up to Taiwan, not China.
 

Jimmy Durante's Ballsack

Spooky ghost avatar ooOoooO
kiwifarms.net

Even though a lot of Western leaders haven't done a good job, I'm very sceptical about how the media is saying that China has "recovered". You don't know what they're hiding. How? By lying about the coronavirus, locking up citizens in their homes, covering up cases while they have their eye on attacking other nations such as Taiwan, India, Japan, and the nations of the South China Sea. The CCP are using this virus to get away with causing issues.

We should be looking up to Taiwan, not China.
There were 21 million COVID deaths in China.

"Leading the recovery" my ass.
 

AnOminous

But I'm not mad at anyone.
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
kiwifarms.net
What sort of science fiction does Xi Jinping like? How can China’s weathermen use the president’s political philosophy to improve their forecasts? In what ways can “Xi Thought” help prepare the country for the next big earthquake?

These are the sorts of questions Communist Party cadres are now pondering as they prepare for the next big milestone in the president’s effort to cement his control: Elevating Xi Thought alongside Maoism. The esoteric concept is expected to be written into the five-year development blueprint that will be unveiled after party meetings later this month. Everyone from diplomats to executives to sci-fi writers are under pressure to incorporate the broad, often fuzzy tenets of Xi Thought into their policies.
(...)
The China Meteorological Administration was found in August to have some gaps to bridge in applying Xi’s idea of domestic and international situations into their work while the China Earthquake Administration got wrapped for not fully reflecting Xi’s Thought into their disaster prevention work. Writers and producers in the nation’s burgeoning science fiction scene were urged by an official industry association to take Xi Thought on board and transform China into a sci-fi powerhouse.


'Xi Thought' creeping into everything from Chinese sci-fi to company filings
Nuke the chinks. These subhumans cannot be allowed to rule the planet.
 
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