War Hong Kong Garden Takeaway (Megathread) - Time to kill some fuckin' ugly reds

AlexJonesGotMePregnant

I'll get my humanity and my sanity back.
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No faith in Korea or Southeast Asia?
Korea is tiny compared to china and india. Even abck in korea's glory days, it sidled up next to the empire of china as the smaller confucian Kingdom of Koguryo, paying dues to keep trade going while china ignored the little peninsula. S.Korea is doing well for itself these days as its cultural exports make it mint, but it'll hit a point to where their corporatist feudalism (similar to japan) will start hurting the economy; the embarrassment of their first female president being controlled by corporate powers and a literal fortune teller only a few years ago is just a preview of what will happen if they continue growing their economy without some house cleaning. Or they'll move back to a military dictatorship like they had until 1997.
 

Rausch

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NBA grows somewhat of a spine, and Adam Silver (NBA CEO) says that people who work for the NBA should have the right to speak. China in turn bans all broadcast of NBA.
It's an interesting apology of Silver's. On the one hand he is trotting out the old meme of apologising for hurting the feelings of the Chinese people but on the other, he is qualifying it by saying he supports the right to free speech of NBA people. The communist regime will be unsatisfied as they like their apologies to be unambiguous and unreserved.


Perhaps Mr Silver felt a little boxed in by these comments:

Newsweek on 21st May 2019 said:
Silver said the NBA will not "police every tweet" and he encouraged players to have political opinions about topics like President Donald Trump's policies and Black Lives Matter "just like every other American."

"If done respectfully and if a player chooses to say 'I don't suppport [sic] that president or particular policies of that president' that makes the player, hopefully, like every other American," Silver continued. "What I've said about people who have said to me 'how can you let a player criticize the president?' I've always said, 'this is America.'

This is America, indeed.

I personally think it is intolerable that anyone in the Western world is ever in a position where we are expected to apologise to any Chinese official, given how that country's government is turning a blind eye to the production of fentanyl and its subsequent smuggling in to the US and Europe killing thousands if not tens of thousands of people per year.

Anyway, on a lighter note it looks like Silver wants the private meeting so he can explain to the commies that the context is "look I can't say I disavow free speech in public after I endorsed anti-Trump free speech earlier in the year and yes I know I'm an asshole and this is what I get for making political statements when I'm supposed to just be a basketball guy". Can't imagine that the Rockets guy missed those comments earlier in the year from the NBA commissioner. If I was Daryl Morey and it had pissed me off at the time and I had wanted to make Silver look like an ass for saying that, then that pro-HK protestor Tweet would be a pretty good way to do it... especially as the Rockets were the team of Chinese national hero Yao Ming.

Calculated sleight or spontaneous political commentary, this whole thing is completely ridiculous. We know that the commies have an insufferable combination of arrogance and thin skin, but given how they can't even command the people on the streets of Hong Kong to stop wearing face fedoras, what on Earth makes them think their priority is commanding Americans who live in America what they can and can't write in English on an American social media platform that is blocked in China?
 
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AlexJonesGotMePregnant

I'll get my humanity and my sanity back.
kiwifarms.net
It's an interesting apology of Silver's. On the one hand he is trotting out the old meme of apologising for hurting the feelings of the Chinese people but on the other, he is qualifying it by saying he supports the right to free speech of NBA people. The communist regime will be unsatisfied as they like their apologies to be unambiguous and unreserved.


Perhaps Mr Silver felt a little boxed in by these comments:



This is America, indeed.

I personally think it is intolerable that anyone in the Western world is ever in a position where we are expected to apologise to any Chinese official, given how that country's government is turning a blind eye to the production of fentanyl and its subsequent smuggling in to the US and Europe killing thousands if not tens of thousands of people per year.

Anyway, on a lighter note it looks like Silver wants the private meeting so he can explain to the commies that the context is "look I can't say I disavow free speech in public after I endorsed anti-Trump free speech earlier in the year and yes I know I'm an asshole and this is what I get for making political statements when I'm supposed to just be a basketball guy". Can't imagine that the Rockets guy missed those comments earlier in the year from the NBA commissioner. If I was Daryl Morey and it had pissed me off at the time and I had wanted to make Silver look like an ass for saying that, then that pro-HK protestor Tweet would be a pretty good way to do it... especially as the Rockets were the team of Chinese national hero Yao Ming.

Calculated sleight or spontaneous political commentary, this whole thing is completely ridiculous. We know that the commies have an insufferable combination of arrogance and thin skin, but given how they can't even command the people on the streets of Hong Kong to stop wearing face fedoras, what on Earth makes them think their priority is commanding Americans who live in America what they can and can't write in English on an American social media platform that is blocked in China?
Between this and the recent South Park episode, it seems that some segments of american business are openly flipping the bird at china. People can crow about the trade wars all they want, but China will hurt badly if more and more businesses tell them to fuck off. Nothing bothers thin-skinned bitches more than assholes who offend and move on.
 

AlexJonesGotMePregnant

I'll get my humanity and my sanity back.
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Silicon Valley sure does love communism


forgive the double post but holy shit

Two days later, on October 8, Activision Blizzard suspended him from competing in Hearthstone esports tournaments for a year, rescinded his $3000 winnings from the tournament, and fired the two people who interviewed him.

...

“While we stand by one’s right to express individual thoughts and opinions, players and other participants that elect to participate in our esports competitions must abide by the official competition rules,” Activision Blizzard said. Comments are disabled on the post.
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Activision Blizzard Suspends ‘Hearthstone’ Pro Player for Supporting Hong Kong Protests

Chung “Blitzchung” Ng Wai was suspended from playing in pro tournaments and had his recent winnings rescinded after expressing support for pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong.

By Matthew Gault
Oct 8 2019, 11:26am
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SCREENGRAB: YOUTUBE
Activision Blizzard suspended Hearthstone pro Chung “Blitzchung” Ng Wai on Tuesday after he spoke up in support of protests in Hong Kong during a post-match interview during Hearsthone’s Asia-Pacific Grandmaster tournament on October 6.
Two days later, on October 8, Activision Blizzard suspended him from competing in Hearthstone esports tournaments for a year, rescinded his $3000 winnings from the tournament, and fired the two people who interviewed him.

Each year, Hearhstone’s best players compete in regional tournaments that narrow the field to 48 Grandmasters. After the regionals, the Grandmasters play for a $500,000 prize pool. After winning a match in the Asia-Pacific regional, Chung streamed a post-victory interview while wearing ski goggles and a gas mask, a look often worn by protestors in Hong Kong to mitigate the effects of tear gas.
“Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our time,” Chung said on the stream, a phrase that’s become a rallying cry for protestors in Hong Kong.
The match is still available online, but the controversial moment of political protest has been scrubbed from Twitch and YouTube. In a statement published on October 8, Activision Blizzard announced it was suspending Chung for violating official competition rules.

“Engaging in any act that, in Blizzard’s sole discretion, brings you into public disrepute, offends a portion or group of the public, or otherwise damages Blizzard image will result in removal from Grandmasters and reduction of the player’s prize total to $0 USD, in addition to other remedies which may be provided for under the Handbook and Blizzard’s Website Terms,” Activision Blizzard said, citing its rules.
“While we stand by one’s right to express individual thoughts and opinions, players and other participants that elect to participate in our esports competitions must abide by the official competition rules,” Activision Blizzard said. Comments are disabled on the post.

The protests in Hong Kong began in June when its leadership proposed a law that would allow the extradition of criminals to mainland China. The government rescinded the proposed bill in September, but protests continue. The people in the streets are now demanding greater democracy in Hong Kong and an investigation into the violent actions of the police during the protests.
"As you know there are serious protests in my country now. My call on stream was just another form of participation of the protest that I wish to grab more attention,” Chung told esports website Inven Global. “I put so much effort in that social movement in the past few months, that I sometimes couldn't focus on preparing my Grandmaster match. I know what my action on stream means. It could cause me [a] lot of trouble, even my personal safety in real life. But I think it's my duty to say something about the issue."
Chung isn’t the only high profile media personality to clash with China this month. Beijing banned South Park after the cartoon aired an episode critical of its censorship of art.
“Fight for Freedom. Standing with Hong Kong,” Daryl Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets NBA team, tweeted last weekend. On Monday morning, Morey had deleted the tweet and posted an apology. Tencent, a media company with the exclusive rights to stream the NBA in China and a 4.9 percent stake in Activision Blizzard, immediately suspended NBA broadcasts after Morey’s initial tweet.

Activision Blizzard did not immediately respond to our request for comment, and Chung declined to comment.

Archive is failing for the apple article as well.
Apple is hiding Taiwan’s flag emoji if you’re in Hong Kong or Macau
37
But there are still ways to use it
By Jay Peters and Nick Statt Oct 7, 2019, 6:32pm EDT
Share this story
iphone 8 plus ios emoji

When Apple released iOS 13.1.1 in late September, it appears to have dropped the Taiwan flag from the emoji keyboard for users that have their iOS region set to Hong Kong or Macau, as noticed by the blog Hiraku and later corroborated by Hong Kong Free Press.
The Taiwan flag emoji isn’t completely gone — apparently, it will still display in apps and on websites, and you can even still “type” it by either typing “Taiwan” in English and selecting it from Apple’s next-word predictions or by copying and pasting it.
Regardless, the removal is being treated by activists and pro-Hong Kong supporters as another attempt from mainland China to establish sovereignty over areas it considers under its control. Because of Taiwan’s political status, the People’s Republic of China considers any mention of or allusion to its independence as an offense against its sovereignty.

王博源 Wang Boyuan

✔@thisboyuan

https://twitter.com/thisboyuan/status/1179681769022353409

Apple’s region lock of ROC Taiwan flag
🇹🇼
extended beyond CN devices to HK and Macau’s in the iOS/iPadOS 13.1.1 rollout. Interestingly, the new lock only affects the keyboard, and has no problem displaying and is easy to bypass by switching region. https://twitter.com/hirakujira/status/1179627685443751936 …
View image on Twitter
Hiraku@hirakujira

iOS 13.1.1 之後,在香港、澳門的 Emoji 鍵盤不會出現中華民國國旗了 - https://ift.tt/2o0KUAo | Hiraku Dev


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The change comes in the midst of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, which have been ongoing for months and only continue to intensify as the Chinese government has taken measures to crackdown on the movement. The heightened tensions have had all sorts of ripple effects on American businesses, too, as companies fearful of being shown the door by one of the world’s most economically influential countries are bowing to pressure from China to stay away from politically sensitive topics.
CHINA PRESSURES FOREIGN COMPANIES TO ADHERE TO ITS POLITICAL WORLDVIEW TO DO BUSINESS IN THE COUNTRY
The NBA this past weekend formally apologized to China for a tweet from Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey that voiced support for Hong Kong; China is the NBA’s biggest foreign market. And video game company Activision Blizzard removed a recording of a professional Hearthstone player calling for Hong Kong’s liberation in a post-game interview. There’s a long history of other companies, from the Gap to Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler, issuing public apologies to avoid running afoul of China’s strict speech policies and its stance on hot-button topics like Hong Kong’s independence and political turmoil in Taiwan and Tibet.
Apple has a history of appeasing China as well, considering how large a market China is and the iPhone maker’s manufacturing supply chain in the country. Earlier this year, Apple censored a number of Hong Kong singers on the China version of Apple Music, and the company has in the past removed VPN apps from the Chinese version of the App Store. It has even hidden this emoji before, too — since 2017, iPhone users in mainland China have been unable to see or type the Taiwan flag on their devices at all, according to Emojipedia.
 

Freedom Fries

kiwifarms.net
Silicon Valley sure does love communism


forgive the double post but holy shit


archive

archive is failing, text dump in spoiler
Activision Blizzard Suspends ‘Hearthstone’ Pro Player for Supporting Hong Kong Protests

Chung “Blitzchung” Ng Wai was suspended from playing in pro tournaments and had his recent winnings rescinded after expressing support for pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong.

By Matthew Gault
Oct 8 2019, 11:26am
ShareTweet

SCREENGRAB: YOUTUBE
Activision Blizzard suspended Hearthstone pro Chung “Blitzchung” Ng Wai on Tuesday after he spoke up in support of protests in Hong Kong during a post-match interview during Hearsthone’s Asia-Pacific Grandmaster tournament on October 6.
Two days later, on October 8, Activision Blizzard suspended him from competing in Hearthstone esports tournaments for a year, rescinded his $3000 winnings from the tournament, and fired the two people who interviewed him.

Each year, Hearhstone’s best players compete in regional tournaments that narrow the field to 48 Grandmasters. After the regionals, the Grandmasters play for a $500,000 prize pool. After winning a match in the Asia-Pacific regional, Chung streamed a post-victory interview while wearing ski goggles and a gas mask, a look often worn by protestors in Hong Kong to mitigate the effects of tear gas.
“Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our time,” Chung said on the stream, a phrase that’s become a rallying cry for protestors in Hong Kong.
The match is still available online, but the controversial moment of political protest has been scrubbed from Twitch and YouTube. In a statement published on October 8, Activision Blizzard announced it was suspending Chung for violating official competition rules.

“Engaging in any act that, in Blizzard’s sole discretion, brings you into public disrepute, offends a portion or group of the public, or otherwise damages Blizzard image will result in removal from Grandmasters and reduction of the player’s prize total to $0 USD, in addition to other remedies which may be provided for under the Handbook and Blizzard’s Website Terms,” Activision Blizzard said, citing its rules.
“While we stand by one’s right to express individual thoughts and opinions, players and other participants that elect to participate in our esports competitions must abide by the official competition rules,” Activision Blizzard said. Comments are disabled on the post.

The protests in Hong Kong began in June when its leadership proposed a law that would allow the extradition of criminals to mainland China. The government rescinded the proposed bill in September, but protests continue. The people in the streets are now demanding greater democracy in Hong Kong and an investigation into the violent actions of the police during the protests.
"As you know there are serious protests in my country now. My call on stream was just another form of participation of the protest that I wish to grab more attention,” Chung told esports website Inven Global. “I put so much effort in that social movement in the past few months, that I sometimes couldn't focus on preparing my Grandmaster match. I know what my action on stream means. It could cause me [a] lot of trouble, even my personal safety in real life. But I think it's my duty to say something about the issue."
Chung isn’t the only high profile media personality to clash with China this month. Beijing banned South Park after the cartoon aired an episode critical of its censorship of art.
“Fight for Freedom. Standing with Hong Kong,” Daryl Morey, the general manager of the Houston Rockets NBA team, tweeted last weekend. On Monday morning, Morey had deleted the tweet and posted an apology. Tencent, a media company with the exclusive rights to stream the NBA in China and a 4.9 percent stake in Activision Blizzard, immediately suspended NBA broadcasts after Morey’s initial tweet.

Activision Blizzard did not immediately respond to our request for comment, and Chung declined to comment.

Archive is failing for the apple article as well.
Apple is hiding Taiwan’s flag emoji if you’re in Hong Kong or Macau
37
But there are still ways to use it
By Jay Peters and Nick Statt Oct 7, 2019, 6:32pm EDT
Share this story
iphone 8 plus ios emoji

When Apple released iOS 13.1.1 in late September, it appears to have dropped the Taiwan flag from the emoji keyboard for users that have their iOS region set to Hong Kong or Macau, as noticed by the blog Hiraku and later corroborated by Hong Kong Free Press.
The Taiwan flag emoji isn’t completely gone — apparently, it will still display in apps and on websites, and you can even still “type” it by either typing “Taiwan” in English and selecting it from Apple’s next-word predictions or by copying and pasting it.
Regardless, the removal is being treated by activists and pro-Hong Kong supporters as another attempt from mainland China to establish sovereignty over areas it considers under its control. Because of Taiwan’s political status, the People’s Republic of China considers any mention of or allusion to its independence as an offense against its sovereignty.

207 people are talking about this


The change comes in the midst of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, which have been ongoing for months and only continue to intensify as the Chinese government has taken measures to crackdown on the movement. The heightened tensions have had all sorts of ripple effects on American businesses, too, as companies fearful of being shown the door by one of the world’s most economically influential countries are bowing to pressure from China to stay away from politically sensitive topics.
CHINA PRESSURES FOREIGN COMPANIES TO ADHERE TO ITS POLITICAL WORLDVIEW TO DO BUSINESS IN THE COUNTRY
The NBA this past weekend formally apologized to China for a tweet from Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey that voiced support for Hong Kong; China is the NBA’s biggest foreign market. And video game company Activision Blizzard removed a recording of a professional Hearthstone player calling for Hong Kong’s liberation in a post-game interview. There’s a long history of other companies, from the Gap to Mercedes-Benz parent company Daimler, issuing public apologies to avoid running afoul of China’s strict speech policies and its stance on hot-button topics like Hong Kong’s independence and political turmoil in Taiwan and Tibet.
Apple has a history of appeasing China as well, considering how large a market China is and the iPhone maker’s manufacturing supply chain in the country. Earlier this year, Apple censored a number of Hong Kong singers on the China version of Apple Music, and the company has in the past removed VPN apps from the Chinese version of the App Store. It has even hidden this emoji before, too — since 2017, iPhone users in mainland China have been unable to see or type the Taiwan flag on their devices at all, according to Emojipedia.
That shit is blowing up, but will it be enough to actually shame Blizz into doing the right thing? I was hoping to find a thread for that happening.
 
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Qi Meng Dealer

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Between this and the recent South Park episode, it seems that some segments of american business are openly flipping the bird at china. People can crow about the trade wars all they want, but China will hurt badly if more and more businesses tell them to fuck off. Nothing bothers thin-skinned bitches more than assholes who offend and move on.
I actually hope more companies try indirectly weaning themselves off of China’s teats for a short time and see that it’s not all gloom and doom even if China chases you off their lawn. Granted, I’m saying this as someone who isn’t a CEO of a large multinational corporation, so reality is definitely much more complex than just saying businesses will live even without China money. I’m basing this off of Google getting BTFO’d by China and still remaining a tech giant making boatloads of money.
 

DumbDude42

kiwifarms.net
I actually hope more companies try indirectly weaning themselves off of China’s teats for a short time and see that it’s not all gloom and doom even if China chases you off their lawn. Granted, I’m saying this as someone who isn’t a CEO of a large multinational corporation, so reality is definitely much more complex than just saying businesses will live even without China money. I’m basing this off of Google getting BTFO’d by China and still remaining a tech giant making boatloads of money.
dont be ridiculous
businesses follow the money, expecting anything else is naive and dumb, and there is more money in china than anywhere else.
unless the rest of the world decide to suddenly become real hardcore, kick china out of the wto again, and launch massive embargoes against them, nothing will change.
 

ICametoLurk

SCREW YOUR OPTICS, I'M GOING IN
True & Honest Fan
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Silicon Valley sure does love communism


Why wouldn't they?


The very fact that in this entire fucking post, the only reference made to matters of economics is a disparaging reference to welfare states as helping "idlers" and "freeloaders" reveals far more about the mindset of the average Chinese citizen under the influence of Dengism than it does about anything else.

To take this post at its word, the Chinese believe that working 12 hour days without universal healthcare, free university, guaranteed sick days, unions that fight for workers, etc. is somehow representative of the "true left" when literally everything that the welfare state represents was fought for over decades of bitter and bloody struggle by workers across the world who didn't want to be little more than disposable cattle for their employers.

It's basically the wet dream of Silicon Valley CEO's who wanted TPP as a means of combating China.
 

millais

The Yellow Rose of Victoria, Texas
kiwifarms.net
Why wouldn't they?


The very fact that in this entire fucking post, the only reference made to matters of economics is a disparaging reference to welfare states as helping "idlers" and "freeloaders" reveals far more about the mindset of the average Chinese citizen under the influence of Dengism than it does about anything else.

To take this post at its word, the Chinese believe that working 12 hour days without universal healthcare, free university, guaranteed sick days, unions that fight for workers, etc. is somehow representative of the "true left" when literally everything that the welfare state represents was fought for over decades of bitter and bloody struggle by workers across the world who didn't want to be little more than disposable cattle for their employers.

It's basically the wet dream of Silicon Valley CEO's who wanted TPP as a means of combating China.
Also Silicon Valley is so desperate to suck Red China's dick because China is the one market they have never been able to break into. All their apps, websites, and online services get blanket banned by Beijing, allowing state-sponsored Chinese clones and copycats to duplicate their product/service and secure an unbreakable monopoly in the Chinese market.

To see the full measure of their desperation to get in Red China's good graces, just look at Zucc's pathetic appearances at every Chinese tech conference where he gives keynote speech after keynote speech in broken Mandarin, despite the fact that never in a million years will they allow Kikebook into China no matter how much he grovels. Or look at Google's Dragonfly project where they built an entire multimillion dollar censorship-friendly search engine for the Red Chinese without receiving a single dollar of compensation, only for the Chinese to go "lol nope" and continue to ban Google from infringing on the Baidu monopoly.
 

PoisonedBun

True & Honest Fan
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People want to appropriate Mei from Overwatch as a symbol of Hong Kong freedom to get the game banned in China a la Winnie the Pooh. It likely won't work, but this may be the first time I can actually get behind this type of little movement. The Chinese scare me far more than SJWs considering they actually pay for things.
 

mr.moon1488

kiwifarms.net
Why wouldn't they?


The very fact that in this entire fucking post, the only reference made to matters of economics is a disparaging reference to welfare states as helping "idlers" and "freeloaders" reveals far more about the mindset of the average Chinese citizen under the influence of Dengism than it does about anything else.

To take this post at its word, the Chinese believe that working 12 hour days without universal healthcare, free university, guaranteed sick days, unions that fight for workers, etc. is somehow representative of the "true left" when literally everything that the welfare state represents was fought for over decades of bitter and bloody struggle by workers across the world who didn't want to be little more than disposable cattle for their employers.

It's basically the wet dream of Silicon Valley CEO's who wanted TPP as a means of combating China.
"true left"
What exactly is the "true left"?
 
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PS1gamenwatch

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Oh, Apple has joined in too:


Apple removes HKmap.live app used by Hong Kong protesters under pressure from China

OCTOBER 10, 2019 / 3:13 AM / CBS/AP
Beijing — Apple removed a smartphone app that allows Hong Kong activists to report police movements from its online store Thursday after an official Chinese newspaper accused the company of facilitating illegal behavior. Apple Inc. was just the latest company to come under pressure to take Beijing's side against anti-government protesters when the Communist Party newspaper People's Daily said Wednesday the HKmap.live app "facilitates illegal behavior."

The newspaper asked, "Is Apple guiding Hong Kong thugs?"
Apple said in a statement that HKmap.live was removed because it "has been used to target and ambush police" and "threaten public safety." It said that violated local law and Apple guidelines.

HKmap.live allows users to report police locations, use of tear gas and other details that are added to a regularly updated map. Another version is available for smartphones that use the Android operating system.
Changing China More
"We have verified with the Hong Kong Cybersecurity and Technology Crime Bureau (CSTCB) that the app has been used to target and ambush police, threaten public safety, and criminals have used it to victimize residents in areas where they know there is no law enforcement," said the Apple statement. "This app violates our guidelines and local laws, and we have removed it from the App Store."
Hong Kong Protests Apple
A display of the app "HKmap.live," designed by an outside supplier, that had been available on Apple Inc.'s online store until October 10, 2019, is seen in Hong Kong, Oct. 9, 2019.AP
The app's developers, however, rejected Apple's move and said there was, "0 evidence to support CSTCB's accusation that HKmap App has been used to target and ambush police, threaten public safety."
The app maker accused Apple of removing HKmap.live in a deliberate "decision to suppress freedom and human right in #HongKong," and added that it was "disappointing to see US corps such as @Apple, @NBA, @Blizzard_Ent, @TiffanyAndCo act against #freedom."

HKmap.live 全港抗爭即時地圖@hkmaplive

· 3h

Replying to @hkmaplive @Apple
7. The majority of user review in App Store that suggest HKmap IMPROVED public safety, not the opposite.

HKmap.live 全港抗爭即時地圖@hkmaplive


8. We once believed the App rejection is simply a bureaucratic f up, but now it is clearly a political decision to suppress freedom and human right in #HongKong. It is disappointing to see US corps such as @Apple, @NBA, @Blizzard_Ent, @TiffanyAndCo act against #freedom

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The Hong Kong demonstrations began over a proposed extradition law and expanded to include other grievances and demands for greater democracy.
Activists complain Beijing and Hong Kong leaders are eroding the autonomy and Western-style civil liberties promised to the former British colony when it returned to China in 1997.
Criticism of Apple followed government attacks starting last weekend on the National Basketball Association over a comment by the general manager of the Houston Rockets in support of the protesters. China's state TV has canceled broadcasts of NBA games.

People's Daily warned Apple might hurt its reputation with Chinese consumers.

"Apple needs to think deeply," the newspaper said.
Brands targeted in the past by Beijing have been subjected to campaigns by the entirely state-controlled press to drive away consumers or disrupt investigations by tax authorities and other regulators.
China has long been critical to Apple's business.
The mainland is Apple's second-biggest market after the United States but CEO Tim Cook says it eventually will become No. 1.
Apple, headquartered in Cupertino, California, also is an important asset for China.
Most of its iPhones and tablet computers are assembled in Chinese factories that employ hundreds of thousands of people. Chinese vendors supply components for Mac Pro computers that are assembled in Texas.

Apple removes police-tracking app used in Hong Kong protests from its app store
PUBLISHED 5 HOURS AGOUPDATED 3 HOURS AGO
Reuters

KEY POINTS
  • Apple on Wednesday removed an app that protestors in Hong Kong have used to track police movements.
  • The tech giant said the app violated its rules because it was used to ambush police and by criminals who used it to victimize residents in areas with no law enforcement.
  • Apple rejected the crowdsourcing app, HKmap.live, earlier this month but then reversed course last week, allowing the app to appear on its App Store.
GP: Tim Cook, Apple Unveils New Product Updates 190910

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during a special event on September 10, 2019 in the Steve Jobs Theater on Apple’s Cupertino, California campus.
Justin Sullivan | Getty Images
Apple on Wednesday removed an app that protesters in Hong Kong have used to track police movements from its app store, saying it violated rules because it was used to ambush police.
The U.S. tech giant had come under fire from China over the app, with the Chinese Communist Party’s official newspaper calling the app “poisonous” and decrying what it said was Apple’s complicity in helping the Hong Kong protesters.

Apple rejected the crowdsourcing app, HKmap.live, earlier this month but then reversed course last week.
Apple said in a statement that it had began an immediate investigation after “many concerned customers in Hong Kong” contacted the company about the app and Apple found it had endangered law enforcement and residents.
“The app displays police locations and we have verified with the Hong Kong Cybersecurity and Technology Crime Bureau that the app has been used to target and ambush police, threaten public safety, and criminals have used it to victimize residents in areas where they know there is no law enforcement,” the statement said.
Apple did not comment beyond its statement, and the app’s developer did not immediately have a comment on the removal.
Hong Kong police had no immediate comment.


The app was removed from Apple’s app store globally but continued to work for users who had previously downloaded it in Hong Kong, Reuters found. A web version was also still viewable on iPhones.
On Tuesday, the People’s Daily said Apple did not have a sense of right and wrong, and ignored the truth. Making the app available on Apple’s Hong Kong App Store at this time was “opening the door” to violent protesters in the former British colony, the newspaper wrote.
Asked for comment after the People’s Daily piece was published, HKmap.live’s developer, who has not revealed his or her identity, said the app merely consolidated information that was available in the public domain, such as groups on Telegram, another service protesters were using to communicate.
“Protest is part of our freedom of speach (sic) and I don’t think the application is illegal in HK,” the developer told Reuters in a direct message on Tuesday.
Under Apple’s rules and policies, apps that meet its standards to appear in the App Store have sometimes been removed after their release if they were found to facilitate illegal activity or threaten public safety.
In 2011, Apple modified its app store to remove apps that listed locations for drunken driving checkpoints not previously published by law enforcement officials.
Word of the HKmap.live app’s removal spread quickly in Hong Kong.
“Does the entire world have to suck up to the garbage Communist Party?” one commentator called Yip Lou Jie said in an online forum, LIHKG, which is used by protesters in Hong Kong.
 

Coleslaw

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Also Silicon Valley is so desperate to suck Red China's dick because China is the one market they have never been able to break into. All their apps, websites, and online services get blanket banned by Beijing, allowing state-sponsored Chinese clones and copycats to duplicate their product/service and secure an unbreakable monopoly in the Chinese market.

To see the full measure of their desperation to get in Red China's good graces, just look at Zucc's pathetic appearances at every Chinese tech conference where he gives keynote speech after keynote speech in broken Mandarin, despite the fact that never in a million years will they allow Kikebook into China no matter how much he grovels. Or look at Google's Dragonfly project where they built an entire multimillion dollar censorship-friendly search engine for the Red Chinese without receiving a single dollar of compensation, only for the Chinese to go "lol nope" and continue to ban Google from infringing on the Baidu monopoly.
Two can play at this game. The more they fight each other the less time there is for either to fuck us over.
 
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ICametoLurk

SCREW YOUR OPTICS, I'M GOING IN
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
On the GERMan Front.
A leading German automotive expert is calling for taking a greater "distance to the USA" and turning more toward China. According to Ferdinand Dudenhöffer, Spokesman of the Board of the CAR Center Automotive Research at the University Duisburg-Essen, the German automotive industry is one of the main losers of the current US economic wars. Instead of exacerbating the conflict, Berlin should seek closer cooperation with Beijing.
According to Ferdinand Dudenhöffer, Spokesman of the Board of the CAR Center Automotive Research at the University Duisburg-Essen and one of Germany's leading automotive experts, the German automotive industry is one of the main losers of the current US economic wars. Dudenhöffer estimates the losses that can be incurred by 2025, due to Trump’s punitive tariffs and other measures at around €700 billion. Berlin must take a "distance to the USA" and turn more toward China, the expert advises.[1] China is the German automobile industry's most important sales market.

"true left"
What exactly is the "true left"?
What they view themselves.
 

AltisticRight

Matt Jarbo is not the father.
kiwifarms.net
No faith in Korea or Southeast Asia?
Korea is fine, if you mean North, no faith. Korean products as I've came to understand them are either very good or very bad. I had a transformer explode, took it apart and it was horrid. No fuse, no input regulation, the lamination was cheap... on the other hand, I've used Korean made electronics and camera lenses which were outstanding. They aren't behind when compared to Japan or China. They are in fact huge in pop culture and food. Japan's industry started off with replicating European stuff, now they innovate instead. We are seeing China put out very nice stuff whether one likes it or not. DJI drones, phones, 3D printing... it's not just copy whatever is good anymore. Companies who start by copying and still copy won't make it.
There's even this stuff that combat Apple's nasty anti-consumer tactics, it's pretty darn cool (and expensive).

SEA will follow India. India will be the next "biggest market and booming economy". They have the people, the numbers, the force, they just need a good leader. They need to fix the extreme classism and corruption, that's it. More or less loos is just a funny meme, back in 2008, China barely had any loos in the public; there's now one every 200m or so in the first and second tier areas.

Why wouldn't they?

To take this post at its word, the Chinese believe that working 12 hour days without universal healthcare, free university, guaranteed sick days, unions that fight for workers, etc. is somehow representative of the "true left" when literally everything that the welfare state represents was fought for over decades of bitter and bloody struggle by workers across the world who didn't want to be little more than disposable cattle for their employers.
This definition is just weird. I've never came across anyone referencing the "welfare state" when the term is used. It looks more like a western lolbert/conservative interpretation of the term, basically "what I dislike about libtards, oh there's a funny pejorative I can use". Everything isn't untrue until the welfare state part, which doesn't get much light on Chinese social media. There is a welfare state in most provinces in China, it functions similar to the Japanese one. You get paid a bare minimum to scrape by and this payment is decreased, the state will also assist in job searching. "Free" healthcare also comes in the form of a health fund, again it depends on the province or even the city. In Suzhou, it's around 300 yuan a month to purchase medicine and up to 100k yuan for serious operations. Those who work 12h days are either in finance or tech, not much different to the ones in the west, albeit unpaid overtime. The compensation comes at the end of the year where employees get rewarded a lump sum, that's if one can make it there without sudden death, which is common in tech and finance. "Free" university is funny too, China's education all the way till year 12 is "free", it's also mandatory and brainwashing, but it doesn't come with a cost. University isn't expensive in China, just that getting in is hard. In the west, getting in is easy but getting out is hard; China it's the opposite.

What is the "true left" anyway? Unions? They had their place in the past, but what the fuck have they been doing now? Unions nowadays are no more than corporate puppets, they aren't fighting for workers, they are lining their pockets. They ARE the freeloaders. The term 白左 is basically the last line, "ignorant and arrogant westerners who think they have all the solutions and see themselves as the ultimate good-hearted". Stuff like feminism and envionmentalism doesn't apply as much as this.

Anyway, the spineless bunch now includes Activision and Apple, right after the NBA. Silicon valley is just pathetic and money driven. China has no interest in their offerings. Trying to find anything Chinese related on Google is a nightmare, FB is becoming obsolete globally, going into China won't save their stagnant censor-happy shit platform. More people use instagram and snapchat than Twitter or Facebook. These pathetic spineless cowards can suck the CCP dick all they like, they won't get in. There's even this conspiracy theory floating around in China, "the trade war wants to open up the market to allow western banks", this is something China absolutely does not want.

This fiasco really goes to illustrate the capacity of "western culture" in China. Think about it, if a Chinese company comes out supporting antifa or BLM, would America retaliate or not care? Likely the latter, since such Chinese companies have absolutely zero influence outside of China. Activision, NBA and Apple both have influence within the country, this forces them to cater because they are being cucked by the wallets of 1.4 billion. ANITFA and BLM are bad examples, because the media backs them. I can't think of a good equivalent to what's going on in HK. In addition to this, Chinese companies are typically very apolitical, they won't come out in support or against dumb shit going on in western countries.

Here's some dumb shit, if this is true, some of these people aren't different to Mao's pack of red thugs. During the "Great" cultural revolution, Mao's little thugs will go up to people's proprieties and survey them. People were dragged out and forced to farm just because they were teachers, who were being seen as evil intellects.

Agian it's weibo which swings to one side.
32323.jpg

"Day before yesterday, an elderly driver tried to circumvent protesters to dodge paying them, the protesters dragged him out and bashed him up to near death. Now, it's getting worse, they are going to every door in packs to scam money. They want to verify the political affiliation of every HKers and search their homes to see if they are in support of the mainland, HK government, or HK police on their electronic devices such as phones and computers. They don't care about what they find, if they aren't paid, they will threaten to burn down the unit, take all belongings, and kill all the residents"

This is 99% fake, the wording is so dumb and autistically specific at times. I guess the overall idea of "you're either with us or them" is true, but the bit about burning down and killing one's family is hyperbole or projection.

I was actually able to find the source!


This is fucking revolting to watch. I don't understand the ching chang chonging in the videos, someone else can give a brief summary if bothered.
 
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