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Pargon

Internet Segregationist
kiwifarms.net
Mom's show off their postpartum bodies

Moms proudly show off their postpartum bodies
By Karol Brinkley, CNN
Updated at 8:18 AM ET, Sun May 12, 2019

(CNN) — Meg Boggs is on a mission to redefine the public perception of a woman's postpartum body.
If she could tell moms two things to start them on a self-love journey it would be to "look in the mirror" and "get in the photo with your kids." The mother and blogger says she refused to be in photos the first couple of months of her daughter's life, "I regret so much that I wasn't in the photos with her. It's so important and you have to think about your kids and they are going to want you in the photos with them."
'I felt as if my postpartum journey and body didn't count'

In 2018, Boggs was a first-time mom to a 7-month-old baby and dealing with negative body image issues. As a plus-size woman, she felt she didn't look like other pregnant or postpartum women on social media. It began during pregnancy, "I would see pictures of a perfect bump and I didn't relate to that because I definitely did not have a perfect bump." Boggs would search for images she could relate to online but found none, which was isolating, "I felt as if my postpartum journey and body didn't count."
Meg Boggs wants postpartum women of all shapes and sizes to be represented on social media

Meg Boggs wants postpartum women of all shapes and sizes to be represented on social media
In an attempt to connect with similar women, she started to blog on MegBoggs.com, posted her very first postpartum photo on Instagram and braced for how the internet might react. "To my surprise, my messages flooded with positivity and things like 'I needed this today.' That's when this idea started finding its way into my heart," Boggs said.
This week was the culmination of a labor of love where she recruited 25 mothers to share their experiences with body image issues, postpartum depression and anxiety, infant loss and grief using the hashtag #This_is_postpartum on Instagram.



Photos: #This_is_postpartum
22 of 22
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Photos: #This_is_postpartum
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'It was OK to need a little help'
One of the women Boggs joined forces with was Ashley Dorough, of houseofdorough.com. For Dorough, this campaign served as an opportunity to let other women know they are not alone. She struggled with anxiety and depression after her eldest daughter was born with a congenital heart defect, "My main focus every day was just to keep her alive and experience every day with her to the fullest," Dorough said. A couple of years later, after her second daughter was born, she experienced postpartum depression, something that affects one in nine women. "I felt like I was in survival mode all the time, which is normal to a certain extent, but then it started turning into anger and I knew it really wasn't me, I'm not an angry person," she said.
Having seen other bloggers online open up about their experiences with antidepressants made her feel empowered talk to her OB. "My doctor told me that it was OK to need a little help right now and that really stuck with me," Dorough said. The combination of therapy and medication has been a "complete game changer" for her within the last month and her transparency about it has even led to one of her readers reaching out to her own doctor for help.
Ashley Dorough started blogging because she was tired of not seeing anyone that loooked like her.

Ashley Dorough started blogging because she was tired of not seeing anyone that loooked like her.
#This_is_postpartum also serves as a platform for Dorough to encourage other women to dig deeper into what's really important and starting the self-love process from the inside out. "When I look in the mirror right now, at this stomach, I feel like my body is a little destroyed. I just want women to know that it's normal to feel this way but it doesn't have to define you." She wants her daughters to grow up knowing that what they look like doesn't equal their worth.
She calls them her 'hope wounds'
Desiree Fortin's 105-pound body had to stretch as her three babies grew to 5-pounds each.

Desiree Fortin's 105-pound body had to stretch as her three babies grew to 5-pounds each.
Desiree Fortin knew that being pregnant with triplets was going to change her body, but she told herself she didn't care. After battling infertility, she believed that nothing mattered other than the fact that she was going to be a mom. When she had her babies, conceived via in vitro fertilization, or IVF, she realized, "My body changed more than I anticipated. There was a lot of extra skin, there were stretch marks covering all over." She knew a change in perspective needed to take place. Fortin began writing and talking about embracing her body.
An experience as painful as infertility helped Fortin focus her perspective, knowing that there are women walking the same journey she walked through wishing they had her stretch marks and extra skin. "They are the road map to my motherhood. They are a representation of my three miracle babies who I would not have if I did not walk through infertility and carry three human beings at one time," Fortin says that this perspective helped her find the beauty in every single stretch mark on her body. She calls them her "hope wounds" because they represent "things that I prayed for and longed for."
Fortin shares her body before and after carrying and giving birth to triplets

Fortin shares her body before and after carrying and giving birth to triplets
Even though some of the reaction to these photos has been critical, Fortin remains focused on the reason she's doing this in the first place, to empower women to love themselves and share their stories, "It's like a connection is made because you're being vulnerable. It's so beautiful and it fills my heart and reminds me of why I'm sharing."
'They are beautiful, no matter what society tells them'
Bethanie Garcia was inspired by her husband and children to view her body the way they did, like it was perfect. "Once I forced myself to believe that I was beautiful, I started seeing everything in a different light and started that whole journey of self love and self worth," the mother of four said. Garcia wants to help create a world in which her daughters can feel beautiful without unattainable standards. She wants women to know that "they are beautiful, no matter what society tells them or what they look like."
[IMG alt="Bethanie Garcia wants to be honest and open about what motherhood is really like.
"]https://cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/190510162704-02-postpartum-campaign-tease-bethanie-medium-plus-169.jpg[/IMG]
Bethanie Garcia wants to be honest and open about what motherhood is really like.
Before her fourth child was born, Garcia experienced a first-trimester miscarriage. The loss was not only physically and emotionally traumatic but she says it created a sense of failure. Miscarriage is common -- around 10% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage -- but Garcia says that even though she knew this, it still felt like her body had failed her.
She decided to post about her loss and received thousands of messages from women saying they had felt shame or failure because of their own miscarriages. Garcia heard from women that had never told anyone other than their partners, "The response helped me feel a lot less alone."

'It's those messages that remind me that it's worth it'
For Meg Boggs and these 25 women, the only way to normalize postpartum experiences is to be transparent, raw and continue the conversation. Sometimes, there are people that try to bring them down and cause pain with their words but Boggs says that, "I can get hundreds of negative comments but it's that one message that I'll get, even if it's just the one that says 'This is what I needed to see today,' it's those messages that remind me that it's worth it."

Tl;dr we are a society in decline, composed of voyeurs and exhibitionists equally lacking in shame. The fire's already started, just let it burn.
 

CheezzyMach

Totally Narly Swan Duuude
kiwifarms.net
Huh. Do Japanese women actually go in for yaoi like Tumblrina fujoshits and tARTs tend to do? I wasn't sure if yaoi's appeal to women (I use that term loosely in light of the already mentioned groups) was limited to Western weebish types or not.
There's a reason almost all yaoi features effeminate "Bishounen" men.
 

Lilac

kiwifarms.net
This is all over the news in Germany, so I tried to find an english article.
>Neighbors said the 30-year-old was quiet and dressed in a "gothic style."
>The man and the older of the two women were found hand-in-hand on the double bed with several arrows protruding from their chests and heads. One arrow nearly went all the way through the man's head.
>The younger of the women was impaled on a single arrow and was slumped in a pool of blood on the floor.
>A hotel guest told local neewspaper Merkur, that the group was "strange" and that the man had a long white beard and wore a fromal suit. The women were reportedly wearing all black.
Crazed middle ages fans?
 

Super-Chevy454

kiwifarms.net
We heard a lot about toxic masculinity but masculinity is in menopause. https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/05/masculinity_in_menopause_the_emasculating_effects_of_fatherlessness_and_feminism.html
Masculinity in Menopause: The Emasculating Effects of Fatherlessness and Feminism
By Jordan Black
The cultural climate in the United States is growing increasingly hostile towards men. The barbaric behavior of Harvey Weinstein, Larry Nassr, and Bill Cosbyhas put all males in the proverbial doghouse. To make matters worse, major news outlets and left-leaning politicians add fuel to the fire by pushing an agenda-driven narrative that masculinity is inherently oppressive, violent, and domineering. Though it is true that hypermasculinity is problematic, we face a far greater threat at the opposite end of the macho-spectrum. Ironically, America is experiencing an epidemic of young men who fail to launch -- millennials who resist growing up and becoming men. They are abandoning traditional male behavior in favor of metrosexuality -- shoe-shopping, manicures, pedicures, and make-up are becoming the new norm. We are not making men like we used to; in fact, we are not making them at all.

For example, a recent study published in the Journal of Hand Therapy finds that millennial men had significantly weaker grip strength than men 30 years ago. The average millennial male has the hand strength of a 30-year-old woman.

The hormone that makes men masculine is vanishing from the western world too. Testosterone levels have dropped at least 17 percent since 1987 and continue to decline1.2 percent annually. Consistent with other trends in male reproductive health, men's sperm count and quality are also dwindling. Between 1989 and 2005, average sperm counts fell by 33 percent, meaning that one in five males will have difficulty conceiving. These statistics have significant implications for male fertility and health, but is it affecting the male psyche as well? Is it possible that low testosterone levels are making our men's character more receptive to feminization?
Millennial men lack the defining grit and initiative of men from prior ages. Not only are men getting weaker and more effeminate, but they are also floundering academically too. Women are presently outperforming men in every level of academia.

Regrettably, it's easy to lay blame at the feet of these feminized millennial weaklings, but let's not overlook the cultural forces that shaped them. A major reason boys are failing to grow up is that many do not have fathers. If boys are ever going to learn how to be real men, virtuous men must be present in a boy's life to teach him. But in America, men like this are in short supply. Tragically, 39 percent of school-aged children live in homes without their biological fathers. In fact, the majority of a young boy's adult influences are women, namely his mother and schoolteachers. Without a father or a male role-model, boys are emulating the pseudo-masculinity portrayed in pop culture.

Children begin absorbing values and beliefs as soon as they can understand language. A young boy's mind consumes everything in its environment; the good, the bad, and the ugly. Whether we like it or not, the impressionable minds of young children are always learning. A good dad guards and protects his children from the corrupting influences of the culture. If fathers are not there to foster the development of their son's character, Jay-Z or Lil Uzi will do it for them.

But even more disappointing is that boys who have fathers in the home don't fare much better. In their formative years, many millennial males had fathers who were in the house physically but absent mentally. Although they may attend a few of their son's baseball or football games, they were nowhere to be found for their son's spiritual and moral development. On Sundays, many boys were taken to church service by Mom while Dad either remained at home or attended begrudgingly. Today, almost 25 percent of married, churchgoing women attendservices without their husbands. How can we expect these boys to have character when they've never seen it modeled?

But our society's lack of fathers is not all that threatens masculinity. Public education is encouraging feminine behavior for both genders. Statistically, there are more male geniuses than female geniuses, but the bottom of the academic barrel is filled with boys. Schools across the country are reporting that their boys are withdrawing from school life and the girls are taking over. Dr. Michael Thompson, child psychologist and author of Raising Cain says, "Girls outperform boys in elementary school, middle school, high school, and college, and graduate school," Since 2008 women have earned the majority of bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. If the current trend continues, the last male to receive a bachelor's degree will do so in 2068! Women are outperforming boys academically because schools are set up for girls.

According to psychologist Judith Kleinfeld's research, " Girls mature more quickly than boys... they enter school with bigger vocabularies and better fine motor skills, so it's easier for them to learn to write." The U.S. Department of Education’s surveys of student commitment shows that girls are more likely to do their homework and come to school with their supplies. On the other hand, boys fidget and squirm, are easily distracted, and more prone to getting into trouble. In a conventional American classroom, when a boy acts like a boy, he is punished, but when a boy acts like a girl, he's rewarded.
 

Super-Chevy454

kiwifarms.net
An American museum goes nuts because a German party use a 19th Century painting depicting slavery as a poster. I guess it don't fit the narrative for "reparations". https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/05/islamic_sex_slavery_painting_stirs_international_controversy.html ( http://archive.fo/WsqzL )

Islamic Sex Slavery Painting Stirs International Controversy
By Raymond Ibrahim
An American museum is vociferously calling on a German political party to stop using one of the former's paintings in the latter's campaign poster for the European elections.
Titled "Slave Market" and painted by a Frenchman in 1866, the painting "shows a black, apparently Muslim slave trader displaying a naked young woman with much lighter skin to a group of men for examination," probably in North Africa (AKA "Barbary").
The Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, founded in 2013 and first elected to Germany's national parliament in 2017, has been putting up posters of the painting with the slogan, "So that Europe won't become Eurabia."

"We are strongly opposed to the use of this work to advance any political agenda," objected Olivier Meslay, director of the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, which houses the original painting. He said his museum had written to AfD, "insisting that they cease and desist in using this painting." Despite the rather legal tone, the painting is in the public domain; even Meslay acknowledges that "there are no copyrights or permissions that allow us to exert control over how it is used other than to appeal to civility on the part of the AfD Berlin."

For its part, the AfD said the U.S. museum's call is "a futile attempt to gag the AfD," adding that "[t]he German public has the right to find out about the truth about the possible consequences of illegal mass immigration." Even so, other elements in Germany are even more hostile to the AfD's poster: "party workers have had to repeatedly put up new copies, only to see them destroyed again the following night."

What to make of all this? Objectively, the "Slave Market" painting in question portrays a reality that has played out countless times over the centuries: African and Middle Eastern Muslims have long targeted fair "infidel" women — so much so as to have enslaved millions of them over the centuries (as copiously documented in my recent book, Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West, from which the following quotes and statistics are derived).

Concerning the Muslim demand for, in the words of one historian, "white-complexioned blondes, with straight hair and blue eyes," this traces back to the prophet of Islam, Muhammad, who enticed his followers to wage jihad against neighboring Byzantium by citing its fair and blonde women who awaited them as potential concubines.
For over a millennium afterward, Islamic caliphates, emirates, and sultanates — of the Arab, Berber, Turkic, and Tatar variety — also coaxed their men to jihad on Europe by citing (and later sexually enslaving) its fair women. Accordingly, because the "Umayyads particularly valued blond or red-haired Franc or Galician women as sexual slaves," Dario Fernandez-Morera writes, "al-Andalus [Islamic Spain] became a center for the trade and distribution of slaves."

The insatiable demand for fair women was such that, according to M.A. Khan, an Indian author and former Muslim, it is "impossible to disconnect Islam from the Viking slave-trade, because the supply was absolutely meant for meeting [the] Islamic world's unceasing demand for the prized white slaves" and "white sex-slaves." Emmet Scott goes so far as to argue that "it was the caliphate's demand for European slaves that called forth the Viking phenomenon in the first place."

As for numbers, according to the conservative estimate of American professor Robert Davis, "between 1530 and 1780 [alone] there were almost certainly a million and quite possibly as many as a million and a quarter white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast" (the appropriate setting of the "Slave Market" painting). By 1541, "Algiers teemed with Christian captives [from Europe], and it became a common saying that a Christian slave was scarce a fair barter for an onion."
With countless enslaved European women — some seized from as far as Denmark and even Iceland — selling for the price of vegetables, little wonder that European observers by the late 1700s noted how "the inhabitants of Algiers have a rather white complexion."
 

PS1gamenwatch

kiwifarms.net
Death by majority vote?



Teenage girl kills herself 'after Instagram poll' in Malaysia
Police investigating after she asked her followers to choose death or life and 69% voted for death

Jamie Fullerton in Bangkok
@jamiefullerton1
Wed 15 May 2019 00.47 EDT Last modified on Wed 15 May 2019 02.09 EDT


A 16 year-old girl has reportedly killed herself in Malaysia, after posting a poll on her Instagram account asking followers if she should die or not, and 69% of responders voting that she should.

Police in the east Malaysia state Sarawak said the girl, who has not been named, posted the poll on the photo sharing app with the message: “Really Important, Help Me Choose D/L”. After most responders voted for “death”, she killed herself.

Her death prompted a lawyer to suggest that those who voted for her to die could be guilty of abetting suicide.

Ramkarpal Singh, a lawyer and MP in the north-western state of Penang, said: “Would the girl still be alive today if the majority of netizens on her Instagram account discouraged her from taking her own life? Would she have heeded the advice of netizens to seek professional help had they done so?

“Did the encouragement of those netizens actually influence her decision to take her own life? Since attempted suicide is an offence in this country, it follows that abetting one to attempt suicide may be, too.”

Malaysia’s youth and sports minister, Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman, said the tragedy highlighted the need for national-level discussions about mental health in the country. “I am genuinely worried about the state of our youth’s mental health,” he said. “It’s a national issue which must be taken seriously.”

In February Instagram announced that it will launch “sensitivity screens” to block images of self-harm. The move followed the death of British teenager Molly Russell, whose parents believe saw images of suicide and self-harm on the app before she took her own life in 2017, aged 14.

Ching Yee Wong, Head of Communications, Instagram APAC, said: “Our thoughts and prayers are with this young woman’s family.”

“We have a deep responsibility to make sure people using Instagram feel safe and supported. As part of our own efforts, we urge everyone to use our reporting tools and to contact emergency services if they see any behaviour that puts people’s safety at risk.”

Crisis support services can be reached 24 hours a day. In the UK and Irish Republic, contact Samaritans on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.
 

Sprig of Parsley

kiwifarms.net
Right, so now we're to the point where the chickens have come home to roost and you're discovering that doing your best to destroy male identity has produced inconvenient results. I guess I'll settle for this as it was clear the whole "empathy" angle was never going to fucking fly anyway. What happened to not needing no man, ladies? Don't tell me you had a pang of conscience, that's not in your wheelhouses.
 

Sīn the Moon Daddy

🌙 Time and Tide
kiwifarms.net
Right, so now we're to the point where the chickens have come home to roost and you're discovering that doing your best to destroy male identity has produced inconvenient results. I guess I'll settle for this as it was clear the whole "empathy" angle was never going to fucking fly anyway. What happened to not needing no man, ladies? Don't tell me you had a pang of conscience, that's not in your wheelhouses.
I think they finally realized that men have better hair (at least while we have it) and are just riven with jealousy.

On a more serious note I think we over-conditioned boys to resist aggressive impulses in our endless quest to create a better man. Believe me I'm not any happier than you are to see this endless variety of softies and fatsos.

On the other hand, I have no idea what anyone expected to happen. It really is obvious that if you raise a bunch of men telling them that masculinity is dangerous and unappealing to women then don't be surprised when they decide that becoming more effeminate is the answer.

Then we always have our incels, who rather than adapting in a harmful way just choose not to adapt to a changing society at all and wallow in their own misery.
 

Sprig of Parsley

kiwifarms.net
I think they finally realized that men have better hair (at least while we have it) and are just riven with jealousy.

On a more serious note I think we over-conditioned boys to resist aggressive impulses in our endless quest to create a better man. Believe me I'm not any happier than you are to see this endless variety of softies and fatsos.

On the other hand, I have no idea what anyone expected to happen. It really is obvious that if you raise a bunch of men telling them that masculinity is dangerous and unappealing to women then don't be surprised when they decide that becoming more effeminate is the answer.

Then we always have our incels, who rather than adapting in a harmful way just choose not to adapt to a changing society at all and wallow in their own misery.
When the healthiest option for most boys and men is rendered verboten and tamped down on as much as possible in as many parts of society as possible it's inevitable that maladaptive solutions become more popular. Everyone has choices to make, so to speak (and this includes the incels) but it shouldn't surprise anyone that poor choices are made when better choices are called toxic.
 
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