Disaster Interesting clickbait, op-eds, fluff pieces and other smaller stories -

What should the prefix to this thread be?

  • World

    Votes: 100 17.4%
  • Science

    Votes: 21 3.7%
  • Culture

    Votes: 121 21.0%
  • Disaster

    Votes: 333 57.9%

  • Total voters
    575

HomeAloneTwo

I was saying 'Boo-Urns'
kiwifarms.net
She's a grade A cunt/bitch, however you look at it. There's a few videos of her telling youtube influencers and new up and coming content creators that she's going to "help" bump the subs up, and then less than a week following, that youtuber is front page trending and their socialblade is exploding, but their content is garbage.
 

yahooligan

web 1.0 newfag
kiwifarms.net
>not posting the bbc pidgin version

Kenya Homa bay: Mess wey smell bad-bad make lawmakers begin accuse each oda
I had no idea the BBC pidgin thing was real; I'd only seen it as screenshots before. What a fucking disgrace. How progressve. Brits, your taxes or TV loicense fees or whatever else end up paying for the creation of this shit. Shouldn't the BBC do something like, I dunno, promote the spread of fancy proper literate UK English?

Unless I'm missing the dry Brit humor here. That happens sometimes. I get that international news is supposed to be read by people across the world, in different languages. But this just seems stupid.
 

break these cuffs

The weak should fear the strong
kiwifarms.net
I had no idea the BBC pidgin thing was real; I'd only seen it as screenshots before. What a fucking disgrace. How progressve. Brits, your taxes or TV loicense fees or whatever else end up paying for the creation of this shit. Shouldn't the BBC do something like, I dunno, promote the spread of fancy proper literate UK English?

Unless I'm missing the dry Brit humor here. That happens sometimes. I get that international news is supposed to be read by people across the world, in different languages. But this just seems stupid.
bong news network said:
Africans are too stupid to speak English
 

yahooligan

web 1.0 newfag
kiwifarms.net
BBC says descendants of slaves should still speak slave-tongue
Shit, there's that British colonial attitude. I hadn't even considered that.

I have met a few African immigrants who are very, very articulate and arguably speak better English than I typically do. They clearly put a lot of hard work into learning the language (and let's be honest, proper English has so damn many exceptions that it has to be hard for anyone to learn as a second tongue, let alone attain fluency. I have a great deal of respect for those who put in the effort, or at least try hard). I do wonder if they consider the existence of BBC Pidgin as much of an affront.

Anyway, that's enough O/T language sperging.
 
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break these cuffs

The weak should fear the strong
kiwifarms.net
Shit, there's that British colonial attitude. I hadn't even considered that.

I have met a few African immigrants who are very, very articulate and arguably speak better English than I typically do. They clearly put a lot of hard work into learning the language (and let's be honest, proper English has so damn many exceptions that it has to be hard for anyone to learn as a second tongue, let alone attain fluency. I have a great deal of respect for those who put in the effort, or at least try hard). I do wonder if they consider the existence of BBC Pidgin as much of an affront.
That's because most the average middle class and above person in the West will typically encounter rather well off African immigrants who have worked hard, and more than likely their parents worked just as hard, to get where they are unless they're in some big city. I guess it's more common now to encounter members of the imported slave wage caste, but it wasn't when I grew up. The only people direct from Africa and the ME I knew were professors and exchange students at an expensive college. These people came from the upper crust of their home country and wanted to get the fuck out of there. Sure there have been slum communities for decades, but they're extremely insular. You or I don't go into their ghettos. The neglected and impoverished of other races and religions aren't welcome.

There is the theory of a Brain Drain. In the decades since these countries have gained their independence/immigration to Western countries has opened up, the brightest minds who had the moral fortitude to be reject the corruption of their Third World homelands have fled the poverty of their home countries because they had the means to escape. This has in turn crippled these countries because it has left them in the hands of idiots, the ignorant, and the corrupt. How many who had the potential to help guide a country out of economic and social chaos or all our civil war have just left? Is this just a racist justification to tell them to go back where they came from?
 

yahooligan

web 1.0 newfag
kiwifarms.net
There is the theory of a Brain Drain. In the decades since these countries have gained their independence/immigration to Western countries has opened up, the brightest minds who had the moral fortitude to be reject the corruption of their Third World homelands have fled the poverty of their home countries because they had the means to escape. This has in turn crippled these countries because it has left them in the hands of idiots, the ignorant, and the corrupt. How many who had the potential to help guide a country out of economic and social chaos or all our civil war have just left? Is this just a racist justification to tell them to go back where they came from?
It's thought-provoking, and I think it has something to do with why you see more females from those regions in the STEM fields -- they know that if they have the capability, it's the closest thing to a sure-fire ticket out of their country (and possibly to provide for their family back home). Their home countries may never know, if they chased all the smart ones off. A lot of those students -really- bust their asses (much to the chagrin of the other grad students, throwing the curve, when it exists) and for damn good reason.
 

Cloacan

kiwifarms.net
The right to bear.

Imagining a bear just intentionally dropping out the sky, shoving the car onto its side, then lighting it on fire is the most pleasant thought I've had all week. Or just bumbling into the situation like, 'did i do that?' also is fun.

I cannot find the image right now, but there is a photo of her standing in some Youtube lounge or something and the Youtube logo on the wall behind her is surrounded by the triple parentheses (meant to representation broadcasting, i assume). Its just so perfect.
 
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PS1gamenwatch

kiwifarms.net

The Philippines is fronting up to its Spanish heritage, and for some it's paying off
By Alan Weedon
Updated yesterday at 8:16pm
A black and white photo shows a Spanish-Filipino family pictured in ornate 19th-century clothing in a formal pose.PHOTO: A photo of the Ilustrados — a Filipino educated class during the Spanish colonial period. (Supplied: National Library of Spain)
RELATED STORY: Can language curb racism?
RELATED STORY: Which languages should children be learning to get ahead?
RELATED STORY: Ubiquitous nicknames defy officialdom and good taste in Philippines
There's an old adage about the Philippines that says it spent over 300 years in a Spanish convent and 50 years in Hollywood to get to where it is today.
Key points:
  • A third of the Filipino language is derived from Spanish words
  • Filipinos bilingual in English and Spanish could find higher-paying jobs
  • The return of Spanish could present Madrid with a chance to reset its relationship with its former colony

From the late 1500s until 1898, Spain controlled the archipelago, instituting fierce Catholicism and Hispanic culture in the South-East Asian nation.
But Marlon James Sales, a Philippine-born translator and linguist at the University of Michigan, told the ABC that a lot of the country's Spanish influence is often overlooked.
"Most Filipinos don't realise they're speaking Spanish," Dr Sales said.

See Marlon James Sales's other Tweets




"Even the idea of the Philippines being a single state is a Spanish invention."
This is mainly due to the English language's subsequent dominance across the islands as a lingua franca throughout the 20th century.
After the Philippines along with Cuba, Guam and Puerto Rico fell under United States rule following America's victory in the 1898 Spanish-American War, English was instated as the language of instruction throughout the expanded American empire.
The Cervantes Institute — Spain's language and cultural agency — estimated that at the beginning of the 20th century, there was an estimated 60 per cent of Filipinos who spoke Spanish as their second language.
But by 1987, Spanish in the Philippines was de-listed as a co-official language, alongside English and Filipino.
Currently only about 0.5 per cent of the Philippines' 100 million-strong population speaks Spanish; however, it's still home to the most number of Spanish speakers in Asia.
But linguistically, the roots of Spanish have not entirely left the Philippines, as a third of the Filipino language is derived from Spanish words, constituting some 4,000 "loan words".
This legacy is evident right from the get-go, as 'hello' (kumusta) is derived from Spanish's 'how are you?' (cómo está).
Today, as the status of Spanish in the country recovers from its 19th-century American defeat, the 21st century is pointing toward a new role for a language traditionally associated with colonial subjugation.
The bilingual economic imperative
A woman smiles as she looks onto three computer screens while wearing a headphone set with a microphone. PHOTO: The Philippines has overtaken India as the world's largest source of call centre employees. (Flickr: International Labour Organisation)

Over the past decade, the Philippines has become the world's call centre hub, with more than 1.2 million employees generating about 9 per cent of the country's GDP."The situation of having cheap and qualified labour, who could be [easily] trained to speak [Spanish], has promoted Spanish in ways that people 20 to 30 years ago wouldn't have imagined," Dr Sales said.

Being bilingual in Spanish and English also presents great economic opportunities.
"One day, I overheard a colleague boasting about his friend — who is a Spanish-speaking accountant — saying that his salary is three-to-four times [greater than] what we were earning," said Cede Bersabe, a Philippines-based accountant.
"Feeling curious, I immediately browsed the internet when I went home that day.
"I searched for job opportunities for Spanish-speaking accountants and [did] indeed see many job postings with salaries similar to what my colleague said. That was a turning point."
Mr Bersabe told the ABC that ever since learning Spanish, BPO companies have been contacting him "all year round" for possible work.
Presently, he works for the Australian mining company Orica, which had quadrupled his salary from a previous job with the Canadian multinational, Manulife.
Stories, ancestry and the restoration of imperial prestige
Looking up at a corner neoclassical building at dusk, which has two statues of women on either side of its wrought iron door. PHOTO: The Cervantes Institute has recorded a significant growth in Spanish language students in the Philippines.(Wikimedia Commons: Amat Orta)

While a 21st-century return of the Spanish language to the Philippines could present Madrid with a chance to reset its relationship with its former colony, it also presents a chance to restore imperial prestige, according to María del Rocío Ortuño Casanova, a postdoctoral researcher of the Philippines and Spain's cultural and literary relationships at the University of Antwerp.
She explained Spain had never set up a post-imperial bloc like the Commonwealth or La Francophonie (a similar French equivalent).
"There have been attempts to create a post-colonial contact with Spanish-speaking countries like [France's] La Francophonie or the [British] Commonwealth, where Spain sits on the top and takes economic [benefits]."
Former Philippines President Benigno S Aquino III with Mariano Rajoy, Prime Minister of SpainPHOTO: Spain has sought to re-invigorate cultural and economic ties with its former colony. (Flickr: Malacañang Photo Bureau)

For Dr Casanova, Madrid's recognition of the Philippines in the Hispanophone world has been a relatively new phenomenon, given the increased trade opportunities with one of South-East Asia's fastest-growing economies.
"Even when I did Hispanic studies in university, you didn't hear anything about the Philippines — this is a complaint that goes back to the 19th century."
A scanned image from a physical photo album shows a black and white image of a school class which is then outlined in red. PHOTO: The Philippines has often been ignored in histories of the Hispanic world. (Supplied: National Library of Spain)

This perceived invisibility of the Philippines in the Hispanic world has had significant impacts on Filipino self-perception.
While a sizeable number of Filipinos have Spanish surnames following an 1849 decree that Hispanicised Filipino surnames, chances are most people have a tenuous, or no link to Spanish ancestry.
"The notion of being perceived as Hispanic or Latin still has value — it's a source of pride," Dr Sales said.

Pablo M. Díez@PabloDiez_ABC

https://twitter.com/PabloDiez_ABC/status/1110876744582520834

Esta es la obra fundacional de la #literatura #filipina: "Noli me tangere", novela tagala escrita en español por el "padre" de la independencia, José Rizal. Causó un gran escándalo por su retrato sin tapujos de la época colonial. También en la biblioteca del @IC_Manila.
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5:10 AM - Mar 27, 2019
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This notion was also identified by Dr Casanova, who said Spanish had a "classy" value despite Spain's chequered history in the Philippines.
"On the one hand, if you open a shop or restaurant with a Spanish name, it gives it a flavour of being top class, but on the other hand there is this perception — driven through the education system — that the Spanish killed the national hero, José Rizal."
For Dr Sales, the historically negative perceptions against Spain have affected the Philippines' origin stories which have suffered from ideologically-inflected mistranslations.
He said a case in point was a 1960s translation of the book by Dr Rizal called Noli Me Tángere (Latin for Touch Me Not), a famed Filipino work of fiction that charted the inequities of Spanish colonial rule in the late 19th century.
The translation by Leon Maria Guerrero carried anti-Spanish biases that "added layers of meaning that weren't there", Dr Sales said.
But with more of an interest in Spanish, Dr Sales said this could trigger greater consideration of Spanish-Filipino literature, which blossomed in the first half of the 20th century in retaliation to American colonial rule.
A scanned page from a 19th-century album showing the calligraphy work of a young student with a portrait of a child on the left.PHOTO: Tracts of Filipino history are still contained in Spanish-language archives. (Supplied: National Library of Spain)

Curiously enough, this process is to begin in Antwerp in collaboration with Filipino institutions, as Dr Casanova is leading a digitisation project of early 20th-century Spanish-Filipino newspapers and periodicals, which will eventually see them translated into the Philippines' various languages and dialects.
While the project will make the historical record accessible, it will also unlock a vast archive of Spanish-Filipino literature, as publishing with newspapers and periodicals at the time was cheaper and more popular.
In time, Dr Casanova hopes the project makes accessible a vast archive of Filipino history that has been overlooked, or simply left to gather dust in libraries and archives across the Philippines.
"People do want to look at different perspectives on the same events — it's about people's stories, ancestors, villages and surnames."
 

nonvir_1984

Never amount to anything! And they were right.
kiwifarms.net
I had no idea the BBC pidgin thing was real; I'd only seen it as screenshots before. What a fucking disgrace. How progressve. Brits, your taxes or TV loicense fees or whatever else end up paying for the creation of this shit. Shouldn't the BBC do something like, I dunno, promote the spread of fancy proper literate UK English?

Unless I'm missing the dry Brit humor here. That happens sometimes. I get that international news is supposed to be read by people across the world, in different languages. But this just seems stupid.
Yeah, its a thing. BBC started in 2017. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-40975399:
What is Pidgin?
  • A mix of English and local languages enabling people who do not share a common language to communicate
  • West African Pidgin English was a language of commerce spoken along the coast during the Atlantic slave trade in the late 17th and 18th Centuries.
  • Widely used in Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea
  • Primarily an oral language, without a standard agreed written form.
When you hear it in person it really takes you aback: a lot of folks there speak passable English - more easily understood than many Aussie or Kiwis.
 

sperginity

everything is terrible
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I am fucking amazed by this article. I wish it were a big enough deal to make a thread.


Dear Polly,
I have a very severe allergy to mushrooms. I carry an EpiPen, and I have been hospitalized multiple times because of exposure to this food. One time, I began convulsing in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. My husband politely explained this to his parents when we started dating, and I was invited to family meals.
Since then, most meals we have shared at my in-laws’ house have had very limited options for me. Somehow, they manage to find a way to add mushrooms to almost everything. One time, they made a point to make a special plate of mushrooms and pass it around. My mother-in-law said, very rudely, “I would’ve liked to add mushrooms directly to the salad, but SOMEBODY has problems with it!” They even added mushroom powder to the mashed potatoes at one holiday dinner. My mother-in-law claimed it was a new recipe she’d found.
I literally held my breath as the mushrooms passed in front of me at the table that day. That was extremely dangerous for me. That food could kill me. What’s worse is my husband told me that mushrooms were not a common dish served by his parents before he started dating me.
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When I was pregnant, my husband told them we would not take part in any family meals if they didn’t promise to keep the meals allergy-free. His dad said, “We can’t promise that. Everyone except your wife likes mushrooms, and we’re not changing what we eat for one person.”
My husband’s sister even called me up, angry about the fact we would not be attending a party at her parents’ house. Yelling that I was overreacting and that mushrooms are “not a poison.”
This has caused a huge wedge between my husband’s family and us. We no longer spend holidays with them and rarely speak. They don’t get to see their grandkids, even though they live very close by. His sister stopped talking to us. He has a brother who still reaches out and is kind to us, but he acts as though his parents are just set in their ways and we should forgive them and move on.
Short of taking them a doctor’s note, telling them my allergy is real, I’m not sure what to do.
My husband supports me 100 percent, and he is very angry and hurt by their actions. But at times I feel terrible that I am the cause of this rift, and I just want a happy family.
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HELP!
Disrespected Daughter-in-Law

Dear DDIL,

You’re not the cause of this rift. The cause of this rift is TRULY TERRIBLE HUMAN BEINGS. Your letter is a pitch for a dark comedy on premium cable. I wish I could follow these people around with cameras all day long. I want to know everything about them. I want to know what they do every day, how they talk to each other, how they spend their free time, where they vacation. I want to know what kinds of human beings are comfortable behaving this monstrously. Do they look like monsters? It’s hard not to picture them as monsters.
Your in-laws are next-level, off-the-charts batshit.
Every now and then, a group of people assumes the traits and behaviors of sociopaths. Maybe one person in the group completely and permanently lost their doughnuts several decades prior, and slowly, each member of the group learns that playing along with this singular menace is the only way to survive. Eventually, the members of the group are so utterly confused and gaslit by each other that they enforce the will of the group and nod along with bizarre opinions until they can’t even remember what it means to think logically or have free will or behave like other regular human beings on the face of the planet.
Because these people are confused and weak and angry — and because they’re rendered increasingly more confused, weak, and angry by their exposure to each other — they tend to have less and less contact with those outside the group. And when they do encounter someone who’s not in the fold, they recoil and attack. Anyone who questions the group is attacked with words and actions. Anyone who questions the group is bad, and the group is good.
But who even cares? The important thing to know about your in-laws is that they’re literally trying to kill you. I mean, mushroom powder? Who’s even heard of such a thing? How is it possible that they’re all engaged in this charade of loving the ever-living hell out of mushrooms out of nowhere, in spite of the fact that they know you could die if you eat one? What on God’s green Earth is going on with these people?
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I don’t think I’ve ever felt more shocked by the awfulness of anyone described in an “Ask Polly” letter before. I guess I should’ve felt more intensely disgusted, considering the vast range of atrocities described to me. But there’s something so malevolent about your in-laws’ behavior. The fact that they’re not just making an occasional mistake but embracing the one food that can kill you, over and over again; the fact that they’re not just embracing this food but insulting you for having an interest in avoiding death; the fact that they’re disgusted with your husband’s insistence that they figure out how NOT to serve mushrooms; the fact that they treat your husband like he’s betraying them by refusing to show up and watch them openly threaten your life repeatedly? It all adds up to the ugliest portrait of in-law behavior I’ve ever encountered.
And you feel guilty about all of it? Listen to me: Believing that you caused this rift is like believing that you formed the Grand Canyon using only your mind. It’s not possible. This rift has nothing to do with you. You could be the purest, most perfect, most lovable human alive, and these resoundingly toxic humans would find a reason to take issue with you. They are unwell, full stop.
So what should you do about it? I guess you could get a doctor to write a letter explaining that mushrooms have almost killed you a few times already. Maybe the doctor could describe in graphic detail exactly what would happen to your body if you were to eat mushrooms by accident. And if the doctor would also explain, in no uncertain terms, exactly what kinds of deeply ignorant, wildly passive-aggressive human beings would repeatedly attempt to present a known allergen to someone who should not come anywhere near said allergen, that would at least be gratifying and maybe even a little entertaining.
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But have these humans ever indicated that they’re open to new information (let alone new people)? Have they ever shown the slightest bit of curiosity about you or your challenges? They can’t seem to do a simple Google search on “mushroom allergies,” so the mind naturally imagines the many, many other things they’re incapable of doing. Have you seen any signs that they’re heartbroken over this turn of events and they want to find a way to mend fences? If not, it’s hard to see why they’d suddenly wake up and look for understanding now.
Even so, I would get a doctor’s letter. I would send the letter. But I might also solicit a letter from a therapist, explaining that no matter what mitigating circumstances they might ascribe to their behavior, they’ve done a lot of damage to their relationship with their son and with you, and a large effort, either individually or as a group, will be necessary to fix that damage.
I guess that, personally, I’d want to be crystal clear with them before I disappeared for good. But honestly, that’s one of my flaws. Even when the writing’s on the wall, I want to explain everything. I want to believe that people can change. I want to believe that parents want, more than anything, to be in contact with their children, and children want to be close to their parents, and all of the confusion and bewilderment that stands in the way of those connections needs to be cleared away or at least tolerated, even when that takes a lot of hard work and a lot of forgiveness and a lot of deep breathing on everyone’s parts.
Your situation challenges this view. Your situation points to the fact that some people are at once so ignorant and so disordered that they cannot understand or navigate reality without hurting other people in the process. And even if they agreed, in clear terms, not to serve mushrooms … I’m sorry, but MUSHROOMS! THIS ISN’T ONIONS OR BUTTER WE’RE TALKING ABOUT! MUSHROOOOOOOMS! YOU HAVE TO GO OUT OF YOUR WAY FOR THIS! IT’S MADNESS I TELL YOU!
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Okay, sorry about that. Ahem. Even if they agreed never to serve mushrooms or mushroom powder (Jesus almighty, MUSHROOM POWDER!), I would still be afraid to eat anything they served me. I would still stop at Burger Doodle on my way to Thanksgiving dinner, and bring my own bottle of wine to drink, and maybe even hire someone to test every food served to me for traces of mushroom. Because people who are unhinged enough to behave the way they’ve behaved are capable of anything. It’s not just that your in-laws have cultivated this deeply toxic suspicion of people whose needs don’t match their own. They also have a malevolent strain of suppressed anger that’s hard to measure or predict or trace back to its source. There is something very, very wrong with this picture.
Maybe I don’t say it enough in this column: Sometimes people are just unwell. There’s nothing you can do but pity them and keep your distance. It’s pretty awful when you’re related to them. But these motherfuckers are unrepentant. They’re angry, and they want to punish SOMEONE. God only knows what brought them to this, but your only recourse is to stay the fuck away.
I just want to recommend that you take caution. You are dealing with some next-level sociopaths. You need to protect yourself accordingly.
I don’t think I’ve ever written such a suspicious reply to a letter, but my God. Your in-laws win the Worst In-Laws Anywhere, Ever award, hands down. I hope they wake up some day — or at least the followers in the group do. And honestly, I’m sure that once you two are officially given up for dead, they’ll find another easy scapegoat and that member of the family will defect, too. That seems inevitable. That’s just what happens in the Upside Down.
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It’s very sad. Mourn it. Go see a therapist and encourage your husband to see one, too. This is a hard thing to accept. It’s going to take time.
But don’t ever be tempted to believe that you’re doing something wrong here. This is not on you. This is their abject madness, and it’s up to them to grapple with it. It has nothing to do with you. Let go of this and move forward.
We don’t all get the families we want. Most families can be disappointing now and then. Most in-laws can be aggravating. Rest assured that you’ve done the whole world a service by describing to us one of the worst families, hands-down, anywhere, ever. If they were abusive or violent, it would be simpler. They’re the worst because they still get to think that this food allergy is just your little hang-up. They’re the worst because they think it’s completely normal to rage at you for having this condition, which clearly makes you anxious — and for good reason! They’re the worst because they get to walk around acting like they’re regular, good-hearted people most of the time.
They are the worst, the absolute worst. Send a doctor’s letter and tell your husband to write down his feelings in a letter to them, if it will bring you both closure. But after that, put them behind you and don’t look back.
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Polly
 

Lucille Bluth

kiwifarms.net
TL;DR: At a Beauty Convention a Paki called Indian actress Priyanka a hypocrite after she supported the Indian Army while being a Goodwill/Peace ambassador for UNICEF.

She told the Paki to “clam down” and that while she doesn’t support war, she is patriotic of her country.

People are now mad.

 
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Lucille Bluth

kiwifarms.net
This whole ordeal reminds me of the meltdown people had a few years ago when Gal Gadot spoke about supporting her country Israel.

The Pakistanis and Palestinians should team up on Twitter to “fight” these mean bullies.
 
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