J.K. Rowling needs to stop messing with Harry Potter - A general STFU J.K. Rowling MegaThread <3

Kurosaki Ichigo

an approaching murder
kiwifarms.net
Your scenario reminded me of a really good "what if" story where Harry is sorted into Slytherin. Read it years ago and was very much surprised by how well balanced it was. It showcases a tad more of a personality to Harry and various characters, delves into a mature and realistic brand of storytelling, and portrays how Death Eaters are realistically radicalized.

It isn't, "Lel, stupid mudbloods." It's actually more than that. Much more. It shows how Slytherin students are driven into it by family, peer pressure, and ostracization. In addition, the "good guys" are shown to be ineffective and uncompromising, especially when they are shown to be bigoted in their own way regarding Slytherin and dark magic (Ron is portrayed; from an outsider's perspective, as being prejudiced against them), inadvertently contributing to the problem. Even Sirius isn't exempted, as by reading between the lines, the author doesn't shy away from having him look down on Harry being a Slytherin; his own House.


What I find ironic about this is that the Weasleys themselves aren't exactly free from the same brand of being prejudiced, for ironically being a pure blood family.

This has less to do with the fanfic, and more with having gone back and really look into Ron's overall behavior and mindset. He was actually terribly prejudiced against Slytherin and dark wizarding families, proclaiming that they were no good, dastardly snakes who couldn't be trusted.

I guarantee you, if the books was more adult oriented and showcased society more realistically, it would have been less "good vs evil" and more of a "people being flawed" narrative. Sure, there are some genuinely evil bastards who didn't take much to become evil bastards, but those who fashion themselves as being the opposite are easily hypocrites who look down on those they consider "evil".

Why does that feel so terribly familiar?😉
Thanks for the recommendation, I’m really enjoying it so far!
 
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Doctor Placebo

Western education is sin.
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9/11 fucked us up, I think.
I don't really believe that. How much of an effect did 9/11 have on you, personally? Unless you had a relative directly involved in some way, it was probably a day where you watched the news instead of doing your normal school work. Sure, learning about terrorism and violence on a massive scale is heavy, but what about the generation that grew up with the Pearl Harbor attacks? And World War 2 had a far greater impact on individual lives than the War on Terror, because far more men went to war and a lot more sacrifices were made on the home front.

Nah, I don't think 9/11 was what did it. I think it was a lot of far more mundane things that kids experienced and participated in (or didn't when previous generations did) growing up.
 

Dom Cruise

kiwifarms.net
I don't really believe that. How much of an effect did 9/11 have on you, personally? Unless you had a relative directly involved in some way, it was probably a day where you watched the news instead of doing your normal school work. Sure, learning about terrorism and violence on a massive scale is heavy, but what about the generation that grew up with the Pearl Harbor attacks? And World War 2 had a far greater impact on individual lives than the War on Terror, because far more men went to war and a lot more sacrifices were made on the home front.

Nah, I don't think 9/11 was what did it. I think it was a lot of far more mundane things that kids experienced and participated in (or didn't when previous generations did) growing up.
You've got to try to understand for 90s kids what it felt like to grow up in an idyllic seeming time where it really did seem like humanity was getting it's shit together and a bright new future lay ahead of us and then one day, all of a sudden, out of the blue, bam, in an instant you see that bright, happy future literally going down in flames.

I know for me anyway I kind of "froze" in fall of 2001 and I've never fully moved past that, what I did was heavily turn to video games as a way for escapism, I guess for other kids it was Harry Potter or whatever, a lot of us lag behind in maturity, I'm better than some, but I'm still a pretty immature person for a 30 year old man.

But it wasn't just the event itself, it was also the aftermath, there's unresolved tension to it that still lingers on in some way, you compare it to Pearl Harbor, but the difference is we absolutely fucking wrecked Japan in response and unequivocally achieved a victory, a hard won victory, but a victory nevertheless, we won the war and in the long term Japan was fine.

What did we get instead for 9/11? A war in an unrelated country that went poorly, cost a lot of lives and what did it really achieve? It only made things worse in the middle east, it didn't make anything better and a war that still drags on to this day, when they finally killed Bin Laden a decade later it felt like a bit of a Pyrrhic victory after Iraq and Afghanistan.

Americans wanted another WW2 style victory, instead we got another Vietnam.

In a way the whole human race is flash frozen on September 11th 2001, not just one generation, stuck in that day of violence, we're stuck in violence where for a while we dreamed of something better for this new millennium.

The overall psychic residue from that event is hard to estimate in my opinion, one thing I hate is the way the media played those clips of the towers falling over and over and over and over again, we didn't need that, once was enough, what does that do to a person's psyche to see that violence so many times?
 

Kari Kamiya

"I beat her up, so I gave her a cuck-cup."
True & Honest Fan
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Sure, learning about terrorism and violence on a massive scale is heavy, but what about the generation that grew up with the Pearl Harbor attacks?
Pearl Harbor wasn't broadcast on television and as well didn't have the same number of American deaths that 9/11 had. And while WWII is still considered one of the most horrific wars in modern history, us stupidly naïve Americans didn't know of what was really going on in Europe until soldiers infiltrated the concentration camps and dug up information about what the Nazis were doing under everyone's noses. Vietnam would make for a better comparison given how widely televised it was, especially since it was during the Cold War and everyone was already on pins and needles over the possibility of Russia (and America) nuking everyone.

But I did notice that shows, especially kids' shows, started feeling more serious/heavy-handed during the 2000s compared to the more goofy, optimistic, campy, toy-advertisement cartoons from up to the '90s (when they weren't shoveling environmental messages down our throats). The need for escapism was great then, too, even the movies weren't immune to this. It's probably not a coincidence Order of the Phoenix really took a turn for the dark, especially when compared to Goblet of Fire which came out in 2000, and that's when the books started "growing up" with the audience.
 

AlexJonesGotMePregnant

he put a baby in my butt
True & Honest Fan
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Even as a kid something didn't feel right about Harry getting everything he wanted. I think the most egregious example of that was Gryffindor winning the House Cup in his first year.
It felt like the books presented this exactly for what it was: old homo likes young boy, gives young boy everything he wants. If anything,it shows just how unfair Hogwarts is. If you aren't on harry's side, hogwarts must have sucked ass.
 

Absolutego

Middleman who didn't do diddly
kiwifarms.net
I don't really believe that. How much of an effect did 9/11 have on you, personally? Unless you had a relative directly involved in some way, it was probably a day where you watched the news instead of doing your normal school work. Sure, learning about terrorism and violence on a massive scale is heavy, but what about the generation that grew up with the Pearl Harbor attacks? And World War 2 had a far greater impact on individual lives than the War on Terror, because far more men went to war and a lot more sacrifices were made on the home front.

Nah, I don't think 9/11 was what did it. I think it was a lot of far more mundane things that kids experienced and participated in (or didn't when previous generations did) growing up.
You're probably right. I very much believe the obsession with using it as some kind of quasi-religious text among millennials stems from:
-Scholastic and the education sector pushing it on parents as the primo way to get kids into reading in the computer age
-The movie series being relatively good and kicking off the whole 'interconneced universe' long-form storytelling trend in movies that plagues the industry today
-It was uniquely targeted by the American Evangelical movement as part of their last gasp of relevance.

The combination of all authority figures shouting at them to view the series as important and the designated enemy threatening to take it away from them for religious reasons explains its use as a replacement for religion by so many millennials perfectly.
 

Tasty Tatty

kiwifarms.net
The Gryffindor/Slytherin drama is better understood when you realise the main target of the books are children who need a less nuanced dichotomy. We adults see more shadows, but children don't. And yes, I know children need to understand that people can have more characteristics than "hero" or "villain", but HP barely touches these subjects because its purpose was never to touch them. It just starts going this way after book 5, because I guess Rowling understood that her audience was growing up and needed more than just "hero kills snake with sword".

Still, you eventually realise that the ones projecting all those things are adults or worst, "young adults" trying to use the books to purgue their own shitty beliefs and project their insecurities.

Now, in other news, Rowling quoted Andrea Dworkin, lmao. It's funny considering how much it contrasts with her giving praise to all the art children are sending to her.

1593543392293.png
 

Pointless Pedant

Waiting in queue for 2b2t
True & Honest Fan
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9/11 fucked us up, I think.
As a British resident, definitely not. Troons and their friends have been screeching like crazy about JK Rowling here recently and people barely think about 9/11 here anymore since its impact on our history was peripheral (leading to the Iraq debacle a couple of years later). By the 20th anniversary it will have largely faded into history. It's just that the internet (specifically Twitter) enabled these people to get their voices out there to scream at JK Rowling, which they couldn't back in the 1990s.
 

Syaoran Li

70's Rocker
True & Honest Fan
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I'm wondering what's going to happen when we finally get to the 20th Anniversary of the movies in 2021.

For good or ill, Harry Potter was one of the biggest cultural touchstones of the Millennials and for the American Millennials, it really kicked off into high gear with the movies back in the 2000's.

Despite being a British series, I noticed the most insufferable "read another book" cringe tends to come from American SJW's and Harry Potter fans the most.

Maybe it's sample bias since I'm an American and see it IRL as well as online, but still.

I do think @Dom Cruise might be onto something with how 9/11 played a major role in the wider collective psyche with American Millennials, and there's also the fact that the old Religious Right was almost entirely an American phenomenon, especially in the late 90's and early 2000's when the books started coming out.
 

Xiphias

kiwifarms.net
Katherine Applegate of all people, is essentially the complete opposite of Jo.

View attachment 1406220
She has a trans daughter and supports causes. The fucking Animorphs lady. I kind of want to revisit those books lmao
The kid that trooned out is Jake, who they based "Computer Jack" in the Gone books off of. I remember reading it and thinking that the character was an extra weird version of a "techbro", but now I realize it was a pretty accurate depiction of AGP.
 

Elwood P. Dowd

Gone Daddy Gone
kiwifarms.net
I know I'm late bringing this up, but seeing these sorts of articles while scrolling through the news cracks me up.
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This fucking article goes on longer than War & Peace. Don't get tattoos. Read a different book.


Fans Tell Us Why They Want to Cover Up Their Harry Potter Tattoos

When I got my Harry Potter tattoo, I made the gamble that I'd never be embarrassed by my love of the series. Now, I and thousands of other people who got the same tattoo as I did are trying to figure out how to cover it up.
GJ
By Gita Jackson
July 1, 2020, 9:12am

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Harry, Ron and Hermione casting a patronus.
IMAGE: BRIAN SELZNICK FOR SCHOLASTIC
By the time Harry Potter author JK Rowling had written a 4,000 word essay describing her bigoted views on trans people on June 10, she was already on thin ice. After years of post-textual additions to the series and veiled transphobia elsewhere in her oeuvre, being a Harry Potter fan had become tedious and tiresome. I had already been considering covering up my small tattoo of the deathly hallows symbol, but for me, the June 10 essay cemented it. My relationship to Harry Potter as an adult was already conflicted; now I simply cannot wait to have the marker of my fandom removed from my body. Even the news of an upcoming Harry Potter video game, something I've wanted for years, no longer brings me any joy.

I'm not the only fan who feels this way. There have been viral tweets from others who want to get their Harry Potter tattoos covered up. Artist Molly Ostertag offered to help some fans design their cover ups in return for a donation to a charity for trans women of color.

Three fans spoke with Motherboard about their own Harry Potter tattoos, and their plans to cover them up.

Laney

Laney's tattoo combined the symbol of the deathly hallows, which in the books signals to other people that you're on a similar, specific quest, and a stag, which is Harry's patronus, which protects him from creatures that feed on fear.

"This tattoo started as just a deathly hallows on my shoulder, back in 2011," Laney said. "I was fully on the hype train for the Harry Potter fandom on Tumblr. I was swept up, especially in the movie series ending. I was like, I want to put this on my body forever."

Laney said that she planned on adding more to the tattoo. Now, she's not sure about how she'd go about it.


"As I've gotten more critical in my adult years, it's been kind of weird going back," she continued. "It's very, very strange now to have this downward spiral of understanding JK Rowling as an author and also the work as it stands on its own."

There's plenty that's side-eye worthy in Rowling's original text. The goblin bankers of Gringotts are described as greedy, hook nosed creatures that control the Wizarding World's banks, which is antisemtitic even if it was accidental. The series' treatment of non-white characters like Parvati Patel, Dean Thomas, and Cho Chang, who is named Cho Chang, has never been stellar. Laney first started considering getting a cover up for her tattoo when the post-textual additions to Harry Potter started verging from welcome to outright weird.

The first time Rowling added to her text after it was published, it was to reveal that Dumbledore was gay. At the time Laney had been excited by that news.

"I was still in the closet then. That was one of those where I was like, 'Oh my God. It's so cool that she did this.'" Laney said. "Like I was all about it. I was very into it, mostly cause I hadn't really sat with how it felt about my own queerness."

But that immediate joy at Rowling revisiting Harry Potter would not last. In fact, it would get much worse.

"The one that really made me start going 'okay, hun' was when she started talking about the schools from around the world," Laney said. This information is on Pottermore, Rowling's online encyclopedia of Harry Potter knowledge. "That was the one real like, monkey's paw moment for me, where I was wishing for more content. That doesn't mean that the content is good."

Beyond having just one school for the entire continent of Africa, and her lack of clarity on how Native Americans figure into American wizarding history, the Japanese wizarding School has a name that is grammatically incorrect. Laney had just gotten the stag added to her tattoo when the information about these new wizarding schools had dropped.

"She just took a very narrow view, very British view of the rest of the world, without talking to other people from those cultures," Laney said.

Rowling's later transphobia was still distressing to Laney, but she'd already given up on Rowling as a writer.

"I guess I've lost a bit of an idol," she said. "I was very into her as a creative and it's been extremely disappointing as time has gone on. I'm still kind of grappling with how that affects my view of the series itself."

Jordan

Jordan was 11 years old when he read the first Harry Potter book, the same age Harry was when he got his Hogwarts letter inviting him to attend the wizard school. Jordan said that, like many Harry Potter fans, he grew up with Harry. Although the books were popular when he was younger, he was among the few people he knew to finish the series.

"Living in the South where, you know, 'it's all witchcraft and evil' and all that kind of stuff, a lot of people dropped it," Jordan said. "I don't really remember any of my other friends reading them the way that I did eventually."

The escapism of Harry Potter was what kept him interested in the series.

"As a young teen, whose parents had just gotten divorced… Hogwarts really felt like a place you could go, you know, and a place where you could escape all of the random bullshit that you have to deal with as a kid," he said.

Jordan's tattoo, a stick and poke of the deathly hallows symbol on his ankle, was done by a friend. He had started getting tattoos when he was 18, and had just known that he'd get a Harry Potter one.

"We were at a venue that we used to go to," Jordan said. "My wife, who was just my girlfriend at the time, was freaking out because I was getting a tattoo in this disgusting old warehouse. But yeah, he did it. He tied a needle to a pencil and tapped it in."


As Jordan grew up and went to college, he started studying English literature, and learned to look at the things he read more critically. That would soon include Harry Potter, which he often reread.

"I started picking up on things, stuff like, 'hey, she writes that slavery is good,'" Jordan said, referring to the series' house elves who refuse to be freed from literal slavery. Jordan also recalled Rowling's additions that the minor character Anthony Goldstein was Jewish, and that wizards didn't use to have plumbing and just shat on the floor and teleported it away. Jordan said that he felt like telling a fan that Anthony Goldstein was Jewish, in order to say that Jewish people went to Hogwarts, felt like picking a name out of a hat. The Wizards pooping everywhere was at least hilarious.

It was Rowling's outright transphobia that changed his relationship to the series, though.

"It no longer represents what it did," he said. "I mean, there's already so many borderline things in those books. It just felt like, okay, well, this thing that meant something to me, I have to reevaluate my relationship to it."

"The tattoo just started feeling like, if that was visible around my friends who are trans, I wouldn't want them to feel like I support the things that she says," he continued.

Still, Harry Potter was an enormous part of his life. Although it no longer feels like the same escape he had in his childhood and teenage years, Jordan knows that the process of reevaluating it will be a long one.

"I don't think I will ever completely be rid of it, I guess," Jordan said. "'Rid of'–it's not the right phrase, but it informs so much of who I became. It would be hard to completely divorce myself from it."

Kay

Kay said that their tattoo, also of the deathly hallows, used to be a way to relate to the kids they meet at their job. They're a librarian for middle and high school students.

"It's actually been a good conversation starter," they said. "And at first it was really cool."

Kay is non-binary and got the tattoo with a friend who is also trans. Kay said that for the students they worked with, the tattoo on their forearm was a signal that Kay read the kinds of books that they liked. After Rowling started expressing her bigoted views of trans people, Kay's tattoo no longer felt like a welcoming symbol.


"The first time she said something, I was like, 'Oof, okay, well, maybe she'll grow from this,'" they said. "it was the most recent one was when I was like, 'okay, I gotta do something.' Part of it was personal. I don't want to have this thing on my body that is now tainted in this personal way. Part of it is, I guess it's maybe somewhat selfish. Just like, I don't want people to look at me and make this assumption that I have similar views as her."

When the series first came out, not only did Kay love it, they also participated in the online fandom. They said that their annual reread of the series also included the Shoebox Project, a lengthy fanfiction depicting a romantic relationship between Remus Lupin and Sirius Black during their school days. For Kay, fandom often supplemented what was lacking in Rowling's text.

"It isn't a perfect community either. The shared interest isn't enough for that," they said. "The personal relationships to the story and the characters feel divorced enough that I can dip into that."

Kay has read and enjoyed fic about romantic relationships between Sirius and Remus, as well as Harry and Draco. To Kay, the Harry and Draco that exist in fanfiction don't hold a strong resemblance to the characters as they exist in Rowling's work, and Rowling has been quite adamant that Sirius and Remus are both straight. There are some aspects of Harry Potter that the fandom has already made their mark on, that now are only tangentially related to how they're portrayed in the series. Fans have imagined a world where James Potter is Desi, or where Sirius and Remus are in love, or where Peter Pettigrew has any redeeming qualities at all. Kay's relationship to these transformative texts are more or less intact. Going back to the actual books is a whole other can of worms.

Kay said that they always used to be in the middle of reading a Harry Potter book, and despite everything, they still want to share the series with their two year old. They just don't know when the next time they read the series will be.

"When I reread, it will be a very thoughtful, intricate experience of reassessing. I'm overwhelmed by the idea," Kay said. "I don't really know when I would want to do it again."

***


Sometimes I feel so acutely aware of my own tattoo that I want to apologize for it when I meet people. Harry Potter had once felt so intrinsic to my experience of the world that getting a tattoo was a no brainer. Like Jordan, I grew up with Harry. Like Kay, the fandom became a place for me to explore and expand upon the text. Like Laney, I once admired JK Rowling as both an author and as a woman who said she was a a feminist. It felt weird even to talk about the books with other fans, to be deriving enjoyment out of them in any way. I know that at the same time I make fun of Rowling for the weirdness of their books (why is there a Christmas feast? Do wizards believe in Jesus?), the rhetoric she espouses about trans people actively harms them.

I think I've finally settled on an idea for a cover up, as well. I've gotten really into gardening as I grow older, and find the same comfort in tending my plants as I used to when I read Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Plants and flowers can symbolize growth; maybe by replacing the deathly hallows with an image of plants that I've grown, I can learn to let go of a childhood I know I cannot return to.
 

Pointless Pedant

Waiting in queue for 2b2t
True & Honest Fan
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I'm wondering what's going to happen when we finally get to the 20th Anniversary of the movies in 2021.

For good or ill, Harry Potter was one of the biggest cultural touchstones of the Millennials and for the American Millennials, it really kicked off into high gear with the movies back in the 2000's.

Despite being a British series, I noticed the most insufferable "read another book" cringe tends to come from American SJW's and Harry Potter fans the most.

Maybe it's sample bias since I'm an American and see it IRL as well as online, but still.

I do think @Dom Cruise might be onto something with how 9/11 played a major role in the wider collective psyche with American Millennials, and there's also the fact that the old Religious Right was almost entirely an American phenomenon, especially in the late 90's and early 2000's when the books started coming out.
The British loony-left has been screeching hard at Rowling recently so I'd imagine it's fairly similar. The religious right did used to exist here in the 1980s with Mary Whitehouse but by the start of this century it was completely gone. It ended with the 1997-2007 Blair government, who commented that "we don't do God" and Blair was quiet about being Catholic himself. In the USA it lasted a couple of decades longer and slowly faded out through the early 21st century.
 

Tasty Tatty

kiwifarms.net
It's weird to read Philosopher's Stone to see how colossally fucking British it is compared to the USA version of the book.
I remember that people used to make fun of how it was changed to "sorcerer's stone" instead of "philosopher" in America because children wouldn't understand who Flamel is or why is called "philosopher's stone."

I've always found that curious considering we don't have any kind of translation from Spanish books in Latin America or viceversa for any book (in fact, the HP editions in Spanish are made in Spain, read with Spaniard Spanish.)
 

XYZpdq

fbi most wanted sskealeaton
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I remember that people used to make fun of how it was changed to "sorcerer's stone" instead of "philosopher" in America because children wouldn't understand who Flamel is or why is called "philosopher's stone."

I've always found that curious considering we don't have any kind of translation from Spanish books in Latin America or viceversa for any book (in fact, the HP editions in Spanish are made in Spain, read with Spaniard Spanish.)
and it's right to make fun of that because bringing up established magic crap was very much a thing in the books, but more than that the first book has shit like "knickerbocker glory"
when I ran into them saying Dudley was getting a "glory" "knicker" anything I just about noped the fuck out but it actually means an ice cream sundae
 

Effluvium

kiwifarms.net
The Gryffindor/Slytherin drama is better understood when you realise the main target of the books are children who need a less nuanced dichotomy. We adults see more shadows, but children don't. And yes, I know children need to understand that people can have more characteristics than "hero" or "villain", but HP barely touches these subjects because its purpose was never to touch them. It just starts going this way after book 5, because I guess Rowling understood that her audience was growing up and needed more than just "hero kills snake with sword".

Still, you eventually realise that the ones projecting all those things are adults or worst, "young adults" trying to use the books to purgue their own shitty beliefs and project their insecurities.

Now, in other news, Rowling quoted Andrea Dworkin, lmao. It's funny considering how much it contrasts with her giving praise to all the art children are sending to her.

View attachment 1419280
Do the "men" include trannies who keep calling her terf?
 

HonestJohn2376

kiwifarms.net
You've got to try to understand for 90s kids what it felt like to grow up in an idyllic seeming time where it really did seem like humanity was getting it's shit together and a bright new future lay ahead of us and then one day, all of a sudden, out of the blue, bam, in an instant you see that bright, happy future literally going down in flames.

I know for me anyway I kind of "froze" in fall of 2001 and I've never fully moved past that, what I did was heavily turn to video games as a way for escapism, I guess for other kids it was Harry Potter or whatever, a lot of us lag behind in maturity, I'm better than some, but I'm still a pretty immature person for a 30 year old man.

But it wasn't just the event itself, it was also the aftermath, there's unresolved tension to it that still lingers on in some way, you compare it to Pearl Harbor, but the difference is we absolutely fucking wrecked Japan in response and unequivocally achieved a victory, a hard won victory, but a victory nevertheless, we won the war and in the long term Japan was fine.

What did we get instead for 9/11? A war in an unrelated country that went poorly, cost a lot of lives and what did it really achieve? It only made things worse in the middle east, it didn't make anything better and a war that still drags on to this day, when they finally killed Bin Laden a decade later it felt like a bit of a Pyrrhic victory after Iraq and Afghanistan.

Americans wanted another WW2 style victory, instead we got another Vietnam.

In a way the whole human race is flash frozen on September 11th 2001, not just one generation, stuck in that day of violence, we're stuck in violence where for a while we dreamed of something better for this new millennium.

The overall psychic residue from that event is hard to estimate in my opinion, one thing I hate is the way the media played those clips of the towers falling over and over and over and over again, we didn't need that, once was enough, what does that do to a person's psyche to see that violence so many times?
The 90s was only Arcadia to suburban kids who got to play Golden Eye and Crash Bandicoot in peace. America had the highest violent crime rate in recent history. The Rwandan Civil War lead to the genocide of multiple ethnic groups and caused two Congo wars. Yugoslavia broke up, leading to nearly a decade of war, mass killings, and fleeing refugees. The 90s was full of major catastrophes that unbalanced the world.

9/11 seemed out of the blue, even though American intelligence knew a massive terrorist attack was coming for years. Al-Qaeda began plotting to attack America since at least 1998, which the CIA and President Clinton knew about. The actual 9/11 attacks were child's play compared to Al-Qaeda's original plan of crashing eleven planes throughout America, which was itself part of a grandiose mission of attacking the heart of the decadent Christian West, overthrowing infidel regimes, and reestablishing a mighty caliphate.

Personally, I dislike nostalgia, and I'm not gung-ho about my time in the 90s. I got to play Crash Bandicoot, but I had a very unhappy childhood growing up in a dysfunctional immigrant family in a big city. I would never go back, not for all the Go-Gurts, Gameboys, and Goosebumps in the world.

You're probably right. I very much believe the obsession with using it as some kind of quasi-religious text among millennials stems from:
-Scholastic and the education sector pushing it on parents as the primo way to get kids into reading in the computer age
-The movie series being relatively good and kicking off the whole 'interconneced universe' long-form storytelling trend in movies that plagues the industry today
-It was uniquely targeted by the American Evangelical movement as part of their last gasp of relevance.

The combination of all authority figures shouting at them to view the series as important and the designated enemy threatening to take it away from them for religious reasons explains its use as a replacement for religion by so many millennials perfectly.
LOL most of the kids stopped reading entirely after high school. What a waste of time.
 

Dom Cruise

kiwifarms.net
The 90s was only Arcadia to suburban kids who got to play Golden Eye and Crash Bandicoot in peace. America had the highest violent crime rate in recent history. The Rwandan Civil War lead to the genocide of multiple ethnic groups and caused two Congo wars. Yugoslavia broke up, leading to nearly a decade of war, mass killings, and fleeing refugees. The 90s was full of major catastrophes that unbalanced the world.

9/11 seemed out of the blue, even though American intelligence knew a massive terrorist attack was coming for years. Al-Qaeda began plotting to attack America since at least 1998, which the CIA and President Clinton knew about. The actual 9/11 attacks were child's play compared to Al-Qaeda's original plan of crashing eleven planes throughout America, which was itself part of a grandiose mission of attacking the heart of the decadent Christian West, overthrowing infidel regimes, and reestablishing a mighty caliphate.

Personally, I dislike nostalgia, and I'm not gung-ho about my time in the 90s. I got to play Crash Bandicoot, but I had a very unhappy childhood growing up in a dysfunctional immigrant family in a big city. I would never go back, not for all the Go-Gurts, Gameboys, and Goosebumps in the world.
*sigh* once again I have to clarify when talking about the 1990s that I'm talking about America, this has happened time and time again when I talk about the 1990s being better someone always jumps in with "but what about the rest of the world?" when I don't clarify I'm talking about America.

The world is a big place, yes the 1990s sucked if you lived in Rwanda or Yugoslavia but I wasn't talking about there.

Of course you also address the fact that the crime rates were high in the inner city ghettos and that's a fair point, but things still suck in the ghettos, it's not like we really can claim a total lack of crime in inner city ghettos over the 1990s.

But I was one of those suburban kids who got to play Goldeneye and Crash Bandicoot in peace, but my childhood was far from perfect, there were plenty of personal issues and dysfunction as well, but I don't let the bad times overshadow the good times I had, nostalgia is one of the main things that keep me going these days.

I mean Go-Gurts, Gameboys, and Goosebumps, that was the shiznit, man!
 

ShortBusDriver

kiwifarms.net
It's weird to read Philosopher's Stone to see how colossally fucking British it is compared to the USA version of the book.
I've never read the book series, I do enjoy the films it's a guilty pleasure.

But one of the things that really stands out is in the Philosopher's Stone at Christmas they wish each other a "Happy Christmas" which is pretty British, we say Merry in the US.
 
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