World Japan’s Self Defense Forces struggling to recruit amid population crisis -

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A few fluff pieces, first the equipment of the JSDF isn't that up to date:


Why This One Japanese Rifle Is Causing Major Headaches
Just terrible.
by Charlie Gao

The lack of a standardized optic and modern rail for the Type 89 limits their usability in a modern environment. Almost every major Western military has fielded a combat optic as a standard on their service rifle since the 2000s, and Japan’s lack of ability to standardize puts them behind the curve.
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The standard issue rifle of the average soldier tends to be among the oldest equipment issued by a military. Russian Ground and Airborne Troops use variations of a rifle designed in the 1970s, the U.S. military uses variations of a design from the late 1950s. Japan stands in contrast, using a rifle designed in 1989 (albeit based on an earlier American design from the 1960s). But despite their usage of recent designs, the Japan Self-Defense Forces (JSDF) have fallen behind their Western and even Russian counterparts in updating their rifles to modern standards.

The primary rifle in JSDF service is the Howa Type 89. This rifle is roughly based off and uses the same operating system as the Armalite AR-18, a 5.56mm rifle designed as an alternative to the AR-15 family of rifles. Unlike the AR-15, in which gas travels all the way to the upper receiver to impinge on a piston inside the bolt carrier group, the AR-18 utilizes a short-stroke gas operating system where the gas impinges on a tappet which then pushes the bolt back to cycle the action. Like the AR-18, the Type 89 is made primarily from sheet metal due to its ease of manufacture and cost effectiveness. Despite being a stamped gun—due to strict Japanese export laws and limited demand from the JSDF—the per-unit cost of the Type 89 is rather high. The rifle comes in two variants, the standard Type 89 and the folding stock Type 89F. The rifle was adopted in 1989 following development throughout the 1980s and was a joint development of Toyo Corporation and the Defense Agency. Interestingly, the rifle features three fire modes: semi-automatic, three-round burst and fully automatic.
(This first appeared in June 2018.)
The Type 89 has some minor ergonomic problems. The rifle is hard to reload rapidly since the stamped steel construction of the magazine well doesn’t have a taper like the magazine well lower receiver of an M4 or M16. While shorter than the M16, the Type 89 is still long compared to the carbines that are becoming standard issue in Western militaries. The most glaring issue with the Type 89 is the JSDF’s lack of commitment to a real program to put modern accessories on their rifle. The standard Type 89 only has provisions to mount an optical sight (with an adapter), a brass catcher bag, a bipod and a bayonet.

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In contrast, the standard U.S. Army M4 or Marine Corps M4, M16A4, or M27 will have provisions to mount optical sights, lasers, handgrips and lights in a modular manner. The upper receiver of these rifles have a built in rails and don’t require an adapter plate to mount optics. Both the Army and Marine Corps have adopted standardized optical sights. The JSDF has not standardized any sighting system. Sights have been reported from older Aimpoint models, to Trijicon ACOGs, to indigenous Japanese red dots. These sights require an additional adapter plate to be attached to the receiver of the rifle, adding additional weight and height over bore. Recently, Japanese soldiers have been seen with Low-Power Variable Optics (LPVOs) similar to those favored by American competitive shooters and Special Operation Forces. These are indigenous designs that appear to mount directly to the upper receiver without the need for an adapter plate. They appear to be distributed by a company called Operation Training Service (OTS), as they show up in their catalog. Handguard rails for the Type 89 that would allow for easy mounting of lights, lasers, and other components also appear to be distributed or made by OTS, but they appear to be extremely rare in usage.
The lack of a standardized optic and modern rail for the Type 89 limits their usability in a modern environment. Almost every major Western military has fielded a combat optic as a standard on their service rifle since the 2000s, and Japan’s lack of ability to standardize puts them behind the curve. Optics increase accuracy, magnified optics also increase the ability for a soldier to engage at range and identify and spot targets. There appeared to be a standard new rail and stock package along with a bulky optic that was planned to be procured with the Japanese “Future Soldier” program in 2014, but this program has appeared to be axed. On top of that, the reliability of the Type 89 has been reported by some servicemen to be inferior to American service rifles. “Special” units in the JSDF have adopted foreign weapons instead of sticking with the Type 89 as a result of these shortcomings.

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The problem is even worse for some of Japan’s other infantry arms. The standard designated marksman rifle, the Howa Type 64 lacks the sight mounting plate found on the Type 89. The solutions to mount sights have proven incredibly janky, albeit creative. Notably, one soldier was found using a Russian ZenitCo B-12 mounting system that was originally designed for AK-type rifles to mount an optical sight on his Type 64. Other mounting systems for the Type 64 mount the sight incredibly high up on the rifle, making it hard to maintain a solid cheek weld, which is considered to be important for long distance shots. The situation for the JSDF’s standard light machinegun appears to be better. A copy of the FN Minimi, it has a Picatinny rail on the dust cover and appears to be used frequently with an LPVO.
As Japan bolsters its military to deter China and other regional rivals, it should formulate a plan to comprehensively bring their infantry arms up to the Western standard. When the JGSDF’s new Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade was activated in April 2018—their first marine unit since WWII—the soldiers participating were seen only with iron sights. The average U.S. Marine rifleman qualifies with a 4x optic on his rifle.
A police unit is set to defend disputes islets:


A Japan Coast Guard vessel sails in front of Uotsuri island, one of the disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. Photo: REUTERS fileNationalJapan to set up police unit to help defend disputed islets: NHK
Sep. 3 06:38 am JST 53 Comments


TOKYO
Japan is bolstering its defense of a group of East China Sea islets disputed with China and other far-flung isles, with the establishment of a special police unit armed with automatic weapons, the public broadcaster NHK reported on Monday.
The police unit will be based on the southern island of Okinawa, which is 420 km east of the disputed outcrops, which are controlled by Japan and known as the Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China.
"Assuming scenarios that include illegal landing by an armed group, highly trained members equipped with sub-machine guns will be deployed," NHK said on its report. It did not identify its sources.
Japan's military and coast guard have boosted their postures around the disputed islands but this will be the first time the police have set up a unit in the region to help defend them, NHK said.
No officials were immediately available for comment at the National Police Agency.
The police agency, in a budget request for the year from next April, is asking for 159 additional officers in Okinawa and Fukuoka, another southern prefecture, to boost its capability to respond to situations on remote islands, it said.
Japan's relations with China have long been strained by the island row and the legacy of Japan's World War Two aggression.
In 2012, a group of Chinese activists landed on one of the disputed islets and raised a Chinese flag, to the outrage of Japan.
But the neighbors have sought to improve relations more recently, with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visiting Beijing in October last year when both countries pledged to forge closer ties.
And here's a few months old piece where they used anime boys to try to recruit new folks:


Photo: JSDF Ibaraki Provincial Cooperation OfficeLifestyleSelf-Defense Forces enlist anime boys to try to attract new human recruits
Apr. 13 06:26 am JST 6 Comments


By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

TOKYO
Recently, Japan’s Self-Defense Forces have been using anime-style artwork, and in some cases preexisting anime characters, for their recruiting posters. In a way, it makes sense. Many of the most popular anime follow their main characters as they train themselves and/or utilize high-spec technology to protect the people and lands they love, which more-or-less aligns with the intended mission of the JSDF.
For example, in 2014 the JSDF recruiters in Ibaraki Prefecture debuted I☆P’s (pronounced “Ai Peace,” meaning “love and peace” in Japanese). The trio of cute anime-style girls consists of Hibari, Nobara, and Koume, who represent the air, maritime, and ground branches of the Self-Defense Forces.

ia-1.png

▼ The characters’ names are also references to Ibaraki’s prefectural bird (hibari/lark), flower (bara/rose), and tree (ume/plum).

ia-11.png

The I☆P’s girls have gotten annual art updates since their debut, but for 2019, the Ibaraki JSDF recruiters have decided to try a new tactic: handsome anime boys.

Screen Shot 2019-04-08 at 8.30.00.png

The three boys, who are currently unnamed, were drawn by illustrator Erikon, who also produced the 2018 I☆P’s poster. As with their female counterparts, each represents a different branch of the organization, with the fiery redhead symbolizing the Ground Self-Defense Forces, the stoic young man in white the Maritime SDF, and the flyboy with sky blue hair the Air SDF.
The JSDF Ibaraki Provincial Cooperation Office says it asked Erikon to design a trio with the aesthetics of popular shonen manga (boys’ comics) or mobile games, and indeed the characters look like they could change out of their JSDF uniforms and into sports ones and become the stars of a youth athletics anime, maybe as a volleyball or three-on-three basketball team.
Fans of I☆P’s don’t need to worry, though. While it’s not known whether or not the girls will be getting a new poster commissioned in 2019, the Ibaraki JSDF has said that they’re not retiring the female spokescharacters, and that they’ll be working alongside the boys from here on out.
Source: JSDF Ibaraki Provincial Cooperation Office via Hachima Kiko
 

Cedric_Eff

No secret, it's the meat. Don't skimp on the meat.
kiwifarms.net
Using cucknime to recruit cucked male population seems counter intuitive.
One of my buddies work in the Maritime Self-Defense Force. He said the job’s not that worth it. You really have to be a hard ass just to get by really. Plus most of the JMSDF guys I know usually hang around arcades and whatnot when they’re not busy. I guess it’s quite cucked. The ground forces suck dick, the air forces aren’t that any better, but the maritime forces are really the workhorse of the Self-Defense Forces.
 

Save the Loli

kiwifarms.net
One of my buddies work in the Maritime Self-Defense Force. He said the job’s not that worth it. You really have to be a hard ass just to get by really. Plus most of the JMSDF guys I know usually hang around arcades and whatnot when they’re not busy. I guess it’s quite cucked. The ground forces suck dick, the air forces aren’t that any better, but the maritime forces are really the workhorse of the Self-Defense Forces.
Sounds like they need to bring back the IJN's initiations and regular beatings.
 

Slap47

Hehe xd
kiwifarms.net
Civilization peaks when you run out of citizens to fill the armies. Greek civilization was more focused on enjoying the luxuries instead of filling the Phalanx and so got conquered with ease.

If Japan thinks this situation is bad, they should look at the Canadian Armed Forces.

They only have around 68,000 currently active personnel.
You're comparing a country of 30 million to a country of a 140 million. Factor in the reservists and Canada would probably give Japan a pretty good fight in some strange fictional scenario.
 

duff101

Save me a place in Thugz Mansion
kiwifarms.net
Why haven’t either of the Chinese just rolled into the Diaoyu Islands if the JSDF is just full of NEET losers with shitty equipment?
 
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Save the Loli

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You're comparing a country of 30 million to a country of a 140 million. Factor in the reservists and Canada would probably give Japan a pretty good fight in some strange fictional scenario.
You mean the same military with the ships as rusty as the Russians?
Why haven’t either of the Chinese just rolled into the Diaoyu Islands if the JSDF is just full of NEET losers with shitty equipment?
All their bridges except the showpiece "wow China so modern" bridges are styrofoam, so why do you think the average unit is getting good equipment?
 

Keystone

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
IDGI how hard is it to put a Pictinny rail and an ACOG on a weapon.
Per the article they already have, it's just that they haven't standardized it or really put much effort into making it happen. Also their special units ditched the Type 89 and went with HK416s or 416 variants like a lot of western militaries and special units have.
 

Bob's Ghost

kiwifarms.net
Back before he chemically castrated himself, I always thought it would be funny to forge a letter from Chris-chan to the Japanese embassy asking for a visa and living wage (the tugboat Yen Maru) so he could go over and fix their declining birthrate. He would, of course, explain his plan in an jncluded comic, in which he would be in his Sonichu form.
 

Slap47

Hehe xd
kiwifarms.net
You mean the same military with the ships as rusty as the Russians?

All their bridges except the showpiece "wow China so modern" bridges are styrofoam, so why do you think the average unit is getting good equipment?
The Canadian navy focuses on the Arctic fleet.
Why haven’t either of the Chinese just rolled into the Diaoyu Islands if the JSDF is just full of NEET losers with shitty equipment?
The Chinese are not the dynamic Civilization that will sweep the past aside. It's still America's age.
 

PS1gamenwatch

kiwifarms.net
A few updates:


Japan sees rising threats from China, North Korea, Russia
By: Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press   17 hours ago
13
Soldiers on Wednesday practiced marching ahead of the military parade to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China in Beijing. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP)

TOKYO — Japan has raised its caution level about North Korea’s missile capability, saying in a defense report that the country resumed missile tests while taking no concrete denuclearization steps and had succeeded in making miniaturized warheads.
The annual defense paper, approved Friday by the Cabinet, underscores Japan's fear of being targeted by its neighbor. Its reaction to the North's recent tests contrasts with a low-key response from the United States.
"Taking into consideration its technological maturity acquired by nuclear tests, North Korea seems to have already achieved miniaturization of warheads to place atop ballistic missiles," said the report, which last year only mentioned it as a possibility.
The North is now aiming to further increase missile ranges, improve accuracy and operational and surprise attack capability and diversify launching methods, it said.
North Korea's military activity "still poses serious and imminent threat" to Japan's security as well as international peace and safety, it said.

North Korea’s Kim expresses ‘great satisfaction’ over weapons tests
North Korea’s Kim expresses ‘great satisfaction’ over weapons tests
The launches were North Korea's sixth round of tests since late July, revealing a new rocket artillery system and two short-range mobile ballistic missile systems that could strike targets throughout South Korea, including U.S. bases there.
By: Kim Tong-Hyung, The Associated Press
Since a second summit between the leaders of the U.S. and North Korea collapsed without an agreement earlier this year, North Korea has fired 10 short-range missiles and projectiles deemed new and upgraded.
Citing its analysis, the Defense Ministry said they were three new types, including one resembling Russia's Iskander, and flight distances ranged from 200 kilometers (124 miles) to 600 km (370 miles).
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It said the missiles were new and their capability upgraded, and that Japan needs to further strengthen its missile defenses.
North Korean missiles with those flight ranges could strike targets in Japan and South Korea but not the U.S., which has been the basis for the low-key Trump administration reaction.
"Naturally, we must be fully prepared to defend our country from North Korean missile threats, and we will continue to push forward our preventive measures," Defense Minister Taro Kono said at a news conference Friday.

The defense report also noted China’s threat is expanding into space from the regional seas, and said Japan must prioritize space security. China was mentioned as a second notable nation after the U.S., the ally and most important nation for Japan.
China’s $177 billion defense budget for this year is more than three times Japan’s $50 billion.
"China, whose defense budget has been rapidly on the rise, now is almost neck to neck with the United States, becoming major powers in the area of defense," Kono said.
Purchases of American weapons drive Japan’s defense spending hike
Purchases of American weapons drive Japan’s defense spending hike
Fears of North Korea and Chinese aggression drive Tokyo even closer to Washington.
By: Mari Yamaguchi, The Associated Press
Defense officials have said threats from North Korea and China’s assertiveness mean Japan needs higher deterrence and increased missile defense and fighter capability, including cruise missiles and aircraft carriers.
Japan is also buying expensive but stealthy American F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters capable of short takeoff and vertical landing and converting a pair of helicopter carriers for them.
Opponents question if Japan, whose pacifist constitution strictly limits the use of force to self-defense, really needs such high-capability arsenals.

Under the ongoing defense guidelines adopted in December, Japan has been bolstering its defense role under its alliance with the U.S. and is now launching a space unit and measures against cyber and electromagnetic attacks.
Japan needs to be well-prepared and to show it can withstand threats, the guidelines say.
China has been expanding air and maritime activity in the Pacific, South China Sea and the Sea of Japan with greater frequency, the report said.
China's Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Japan was making "unwarranted accusations against China's normal national defense construction and military activities."
He said Japan should do more to help enhance political and security mutual trust between the two countries and maintain regional peace and stability.
While many countries are developing their capabilities to ensure their military superiority, China and Russia have been enhancing capabilities to "impede the U.S. and its allies from using outer space," the latest report said.

It said China and Russia are developing missiles and satellites to destroy satellites or interfere with their communication with the ground.
“Threats to stable use of the space are intensifying,” it said.
On Aug. 24, North Korea fired an unspecified missile at an undisclosed location during a test. Japan has raised its caution level of Pyongyang’s missile capability in a defense paper, saying North Korea has miniaturized nuclear warheads and remains a serious threat, with the country resuming missile tests without taking any concrete denuclearization steps. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)


On Aug. 24, North Korea fired an unspecified missile at an undisclosed location during a test. Japan has raised its caution level of Pyongyang’s missile capability in a defense paper, saying North Korea has miniaturized nuclear warheads and remains a serious threat, with the country resuming missile tests without taking any concrete denuclearization steps. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)
Even though Japan and South Korea are U.S. allies who face shared threats, the defense report gave South Korea a relegated position.
Their relations deteriorated rapidly since July over wartime history and export controls that spilled over to defense, prompting Seoul to announce in late August it would terminate a bilateral military intelligence pact.
"South Korea's negative actions have been affecting defense cooperation and exchanges," the report said, and urged Seoul to "wisely respond to secure appropriate cooperation between Japan and South Korea, and among Japan, the U.S. and South Korea."
The intelligence sharing pact had symbolized the countries' three-way security cooperation countering North Korea and China.
Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force, citing the recent tensions, said it is not inviting South Korea to an international navy review Japan hosts next month.
And some related fluff:


US alliance remains ‘cornerstone’ of Japan’s defense strategy, new report says
Members of the U.S. Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force huddle up prior to an exercise at Naha Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2019.
PETER REFT/U.S. AIR FORCE

By CAITLIN DOORNBOS AND HANA KUSUMOTO | STARS AND STRIPESPublished: September 26, 2019
TOKYO — Japan’s Ministry of Defense said strengthening relations with the United States is “more important than ever,” and bolstering its own defense capabilities can make that happen, according to its latest defense report published Friday.
Japan continues to consider relations with the U.S. the “cornerstone” of its defense strategy amid an uncertain and severe security environment, according to the annual report, Defense of Japan.
To boost the alliance, Japan should “proactively and independently strengthen our own security capability” by enhancing deterrence measures and increasing its presence in the South China Sea, according to the report.
The U.S and Japan have also agreed to “cooperate with a sense of urgency” on the newer defense domains of space, cyberspace and the electronic spectrum, the report said.

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The Japan Self-Defense Force this year has been conducting surveillance operations in its territorial waters, where it confirmed 20 sightings of North Korean vessels “strongly suspected” of illegal ship-to-ship transfers as of June, according to the report.
It also trained with the U.S. and other partner nations in multiple exercises, such as Talisman Sabre 2019 off the coast of Australia in June and July.
About 54,000 U.S. military personnel are stationed in Japan on bases from Hokkaido to Okinawa under a 68-year-old mutual defense treaty that states the U.S. military will come to Japan’s aid if attacked, according to U.S. Forces Japan.
U.S. Air Force F-35A Lightning IIs and Japan Air Self-Defense Force F-15 Eagles train over the Pacific Ocean, Dec. 4, 2017.
MATTHEW FREDERICKS/U.S. AIR FORCE
President Donald Trump criticized the treaty during the G-20 summit in Osaka this summer, telling reporters “almost all countries take tremendous advantage of the United States,” according to a June 27 Reuters report.
“If Japan is attacked, we will fight World War Three,” Trump said, according to Reuters. “ … But if we’re attacked, Japan doesn’t have to help us at all. They can watch it on a Sony television, the attack.”
Japan’s constitution, authored with the Allied Powers after World War II, bans maintaining an offensive military, but the country has a self-defense force.
A security bill passed in 2014 freed the country to take a more proactive security role in the region, where the defense report warns of threats from China and North Korea.
China has been escalating military activities in the seas and airspace surrounding Japan, especially near the Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea, according to the report. Known as the Diaoyu Islands in China, the uninhabited chain is claimed by both Japan and China.
“China is likely planning to make such activities routine, given that the Chinese Navy and Air Force are more frequently advancing to the Pacific Ocean and Sea of Japan in recent years,” the report said.
Japan scrambled aircraft against China 638 times in 2018, up from 500 times the prior year, the report said. Japan scrambles jets “if any suspicious aircraft heading to Japan’s territorial space are detected,” according to the report.
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Vessels from the United States, Japan and India take part in Exercise Malabar in the Philippine Sea, June 15, 2018.<br>Anna Van Nuys/U.S. Navy

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The report further noted that China is “moving forward with militarization” in the South China Sea, “as well as expanding and intensifying its activities in the maritime and aerial domains by deploying aircraft.”
“China continues unilateral efforts to change the status quo by coercion to create a fait accompli,” the Ministry of Defense said in the report.
As of this year, China had militarized 27 islands and reefs in the Paracel and Spratly islands, according to the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative. International law does not recognize China’s claim to the features, which dot the oil-rich South China Sea, through which passes about a third of the world’s trade.
North Korea also remains a great threat to Japan even after a number of meetings between its leader, Kim Jong Un, and Trump, according to the report.
“There has been no essential change in North Korea’s nuclear and missile capabilities,” the report stated. “Military trends in North Korea continue to pose a serious and imminent threat to the security of Japan.”
The report said the North has “already miniaturized nuclear weapons to fit into ballistic missile heads,” a step up from previous years’ reports that suggested the rogue state sought to do so.

South Korea 'wasn't invited' to Japan naval event, says Seoul amid breakdown in ties
KYODO, REUTERS


SEOUL/TOKYO – South Korea said Tuesday it has not been invited to participate in an international naval review set to be held in Japan next month, amid worsening bilateral ties.
Relations have deteriorated in recent months due to disputes over wartime history, which have led to a major trade dispute.


The South Korean defense ministry’s press secretary said Seoul has not received a letter of invitation to the Oct. 14 event, organized by the Maritime Self-Defense Force in Sagami Bay, southwest of Tokyo.
“It’s been finalized that we’re not going,” said Choi Hyun-soo, a defense ministry spokeswoman, when asked if South Korea would participate in Japan’s naval review. “There was no invite.”
The upcoming event is expected to host warships from the United States, the U.K. and China, according to Japanese government sources.
South Korea joined the previous naval review, held by the MSDF in 2015, which also included ships from Australia, France, India and the U.S., including the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier.
Defense cooperation between Japan and South Korea has become even more difficult since Seoul decided in August to withdraw from a military intelligence-sharing pact with Japan, known as GSOMIA.
The move followed the alleged lock-on of fire-control radar to a Self-Defense Force patrol plane by the South Korean navy last year, which precipitated a rise in tensions.
Last October, Japan canceled its participation in a naval review in South Korea after Seoul requested Tokyo refrain from flying the Rising Sun flag, which was used during World War II. Seoul has criticized the flag as a symbol of Japan’s wartime aggression.
Japan dispatched a destroyer to China in April for a naval review commemorating the 70th anniversary of its navy’s foundation. It marked the first visit to the country by a Japanese warship since December 2011, signaling an improvement in bilateral relations.
 

PS1gamenwatch

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A related story:


Philippines, Japan boost alliance in first defense industry forum
By: Frances Mangosing - Reporter / @FMangosingINQ
INQUIRER.net / 11:54 AM October 03, 2019


Photo from Department of National Defense
MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines and Japan held their inaugural defense industry forum in Taguig City on Wednesday, an event which aims to explore defense equipment cooperation between the two countries.
The forum, hosted by the International Cooperation Division of the Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Agency of the Ministry of Defense of Japan, allowed the attendees to exchange experiences in policies and procedures related to procurement and export of defense equipment, material and technologies; and check out potential areas of collaboration.
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Department of National Defense (DND) Usec. Cardozo Luna said the event was beneficial to the Armed Forces of the Philippines because it would allow “to transition itself to a credible and professional defense institution,” as it expands “the competitive alternatives for AFP modernization projects” when they learn about Japan’s defense technologies.
“We, at the Department of National Defense, fully support the recent amendment of Japan’s Self-Defense Force Act that would allow the Japanese Government and its Ministry of Defense ‘the needed flexibilities’ for the Japanese military force to play ‘a greater or increased role’ in maintaining peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region by exporting quality defense equipment to foreign countries, like the Philippines,” he said.
In 2016, the two countries signed a defense agreement that would allow the transfer of defense equipment and technology from Japan to the Philippines as part of their growing security partnership amid China’s military build-up and expansive maritime claims.
Japan has the same defense agreement with United States and Australia, but the Philippines was the first East Asian country that it entered into an agreement with.


Both Japan and the Philippines have a separate territorial dispute with China over the East China Sea and South China Sea. /muf

PH, Japan beef up cooperation in 1st defense industry forum
By Priam Nepomuceno October 3, 2019, 3:17 pm
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PH-JAPAN DEFENSE COOPERATION. Officials from the Philippines' Department of National Defense, Japan's Defense Ministry and other stakeholders discuss issues on strengthening defense cooperation between the two countries during the first Philippines-Japan Defense Industry Forum in Taguig City on Wednesday (Oct. 2, 2019). In March, the Philippines received spare parts for Huey helicopters from Japan's Defense Ministry, making it the first member state of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to receive excess Japanese defense equipment. (Photo courtesy of DND Public Affairs Service)
MANILA -- The Philippines and Japan renewed cooperation in the field of defense during the first Philippines-Japan Defense Industry Forum held in Taguig City, Wednesday.
“The inaugural Philippines-Japan Defense Industry Forum aims to promote defense equipment cooperation between our countries with the goal of contributing to each of our countries’ respective mandates and responsibilities,” Defense Undersecretary Cardozo Luna said in his speech.
Hosted by the International Cooperation Division of the Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Agency of the Ministry of Defense of Japan, the forum was attended by defense industry and government stakeholders from the Philippines and Japan to discuss and exchange opinions, information, and experiences about both countries’ policies and procedures in doing business, specifically in the procurement and export of defense equipment, material and technologies.
Luna stressed that as the Philippines values the increasing and enduring defense alliance with Japan, the commitment to enhance its defense posture is further strengthened to guard against internal security issues and external maritime threats.
“We, at the Department of National Defense, fully support the recent amendment of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces Act that would allow the Japanese government and its Ministry of Defense ‘the needed flexibilities’ for the Japanese military force to play ‘a greater or increased role’ in maintaining peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region by exporting quality defense equipment to foreign countries, like the Philippines,” Luna said.
In March, the Philippines received spare parts for UH-IH "Huey" helicopters from Japan's Defense Ministry, making it the first member state of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) to receive excess Japanese defense equipment.
Aside from improving Manila-Tokyo ties, the event is also beneficial for the Modernization Program of the Armed Forces of the Philippines to “transition itself to a credible and professional defense institution,” as it provides an opportunity for the Defense Acquisition System Teams/Technical Working Groups to learn and understand Japan’s defense technologies, thus expanding the “competitive alternatives for the AFP Modernization projects.” (PNA)
 

Cedric_Eff

No secret, it's the meat. Don't skimp on the meat.
kiwifarms.net
A related story:




Good, the Filipinos are actually known to care about Japan. Unlike a certain group of people who use excuses from many years ago to cheat the system and be an all around SJW. Japan should merge with the Filipino government and let the Filipinos preserve Japan because unlike the Ruskies, Gooks, or the Chinks, they actually contribute.
 
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Cedric_Eff

No secret, it's the meat. Don't skimp on the meat.
kiwifarms.net
Kind of weird if you know the actual history there.
I know. But from what I have seen of the Filipinos in Japan, they actually contribute to Japanese working class despite the immigration policies. They work hard to stay in Japan and they tend to respect Japan more than the Chinese or the Koreans. From what I’ve noticed, the Nigerians, Filipinos, and the Brazilians actually care about Japan.
 
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The Kiwi Farms is constantly attacked by insane people and very expensive to run. It would not be here without community support.

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