Artcow Joshua "Josh" Luna / joshualunacreations / @Joshua_Luna - Failed Flippino-American comic artist mad at trolls, "Do not edit or repost my work"

howyadoin

Here’s the tea
kiwifarms.net
9OdIRBx.jpg
>Kids don't like food they're unfamiliar with
>Adults discover that other types of food exist and they enjoy them.

That's just growing up.
 

FreeHugsCheap

Incredibly huggable
kiwifarms.net
So it's an Asian man crying about white people appropriating Asian culture while acting like a basic white girl.

Also his signing every fucking panel is actually giving me an aneurism.
 

Crabbo

kiwifarms.net
Honestly this is mostly dead, but I just came scrolling by and remember this drama queen from way back when.
His account has been mostly quiet, as once people stopped mocking him, he got no further attention.
These are the last 2 comics he presented, and I definitely get the vibe that he fetishizes his own nationality as it is something he has never known.
Everything this twat has sounds written like the most sensitive white feminist ever.
The comparison that comes most to mind is this guy is weeabo.
Never been to Japan the Philippines , but boy does he loves that anime white culture of oppression!

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697384
 

Xerxes IX

New cat, who this?
kiwifarms.net
I'm not so sure that this guy didn't spontanteously appear back when Null lived in the Philippines just to balance things out in the world.

Kids don't like food they're unfamiliar with
Adults discover that other types of food exist and they enjoy them.

That's just growing up.
"white kids are EVIL for not liking ethnic food" is dumb. Kids aren't known for their refined palletes, there's a reason most kids menus at restaurants have chicken tenders or pizza.
 

c-no

Gluttonous Bed Shitter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Honestly this is mostly dead, but I just came scrolling by and remember this drama queen from way back when.
His account has been mostly quiet, as once people stopped mocking him, he got no further attention.
These are the last 2 comics he presented, and I definitely get the vibe that he fetishizes his own nationality as it is something he has never known.
Everything this twat has sounds written like the most sensitive white feminist ever.
The comparison that comes most to mind is this guy is weeabo.
Never been to Japan the Philippines , but boy does he loves that anime white culture of oppression!

View attachment 697385
View attachment 697384
Funny thing with him complaining about the idea that one should "unlearn" art, he should realize that Filipino comic artist had different ideas.
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This sort of thing makes one wonder: what the hell does it mean to unlearn if learning comic art from say a old possibly dead Filipino means drawing in a style that looks like it was also used in Burgerland.

"white kids are EVIL for not liking ethnic food" is dumb. Kids aren't known for their refined palletes, there's a reason most kids menus at restaurants have chicken tenders or pizza.
Kids are picky shits over certain foods. If they didn't grow up liking it, of course they'll find the food to look or taste like shit, especially if you told them what its made from.
 

Borzoi

kiwifarms.net
If he didn't want to work in an industry with so many white people in it, he probably shouldn't have chose to work in an industry with so many white people in it.

Similarly if he thinks the Philippines and Filipino culture is so much better and he is facing so much fucking oppression in America he should go move to the Philippines, but you know he fucking won't because it fucking sucks there. You would think that having parents who emigrated from a shithole to a developed country would make you grateful for what you have, but I guess not.

r/hapas user basically

Spot on, that is probably why this guy is so obnoxious. I think it is because asians don't get enough oppression points so they try to turn it up to compete but nobody gives a fuck.
 

CumDumpster

camedei707, King of ROX
kiwifarms.net
Kids are picky shits over certain foods. If they didn't grow up liking it, of course they'll find the food to look or taste like shit, especially if you told them what its made from.
You wanna know something funny about my life?
I ended up getting into gardening and cooking as a teenager, this was in spite of being a picky eater back in my younger years.
I was the best cook in my Transition class, but underestimated my end results as I believed to have no pre-requisite knowledge since I left my cooking elective in high school due to being fed up with the cooking elective's constant weeks on a single safety subject. I would end up getting a certification about foodservice safety sometime back. It's most likely expired by now and I just cook for myself at this point.
Luna comes from the Italian for Moon
I take it that this guy's comics are b& from Oceania as well?
 

howyadoin

Here’s the tea
kiwifarms.net
Joshua Luna appeared in an article complaining how Image Comics doesn’t want to publish his comic and cried “racism”!

Joshua Luna Explains Why He Took to Twitter About Image Refusing to Publish His New Book

Controversy sparked on social media over the weekend after Filipino American comic creator Joshua Luna took to Twitter on Friday to talk about his new graphic novel, AMERICANIZASIAN. At the start of his Twitter thread, he writes, “For #APAHM I’d hoped to announce the release date of AMERICANIZASIAN, a book collecting my online comic strips about Filipino American & Asian American identity & experiences.” Then, he adds, “but since my publisher @ImageComics doesn’t seem comfortable publishing it, I need your help.”

Luna goes onto describe the process of pitching this graphic novel to Image Comics, where he has published several graphic novels including The Sword, Girls and Ultra. According to his tweets, when he initially pitched AMERICANIZASIAN in April, a partner at Image said it was too negative and that it wouldn’t sell if no one could relate to it. Luna says this partner, a white man, asked at least one Asian-American staff member at the publisher to back up his claims; eventually, the book was “begrudgingly” greenlit. Then Luna submitted the cover, and he was told it couldn’t be used to legal concerns over his riffs on copyrighted characters.
From there, Luna says, he attempted to seek feedback for changes to make the book work for publication, only to be rebuffed by the publisher and their legal counsel. Given Image’s controversial history of defending offensive material from its creators, Luna says the publisher is discriminating against him and his work.

Luna goes onto describe the process of pitching this graphic novel to Image Comics, where he has published several graphic novels including The Sword, Girls and Ultra. According to his tweets, when he initially pitched AMERICANIZASIAN in April, a partner at Image said it was too negative and that it wouldn’t sell if no one could relate to it. Luna says this partner, a white man, asked at least one Asian-American staff member at the publisher to back up his claims; eventually, the book was “begrudgingly” greenlit. Then Luna submitted the cover, and he was told it couldn’t be used to legal concerns over his riffs on copyrighted characters.
From there, Luna says, he attempted to seek feedback for changes to make the book work for publication, only to be rebuffed by the publisher and their legal counsel. Given Image’s controversial history of defending offensive material from its creators, Luna says the publisher is discriminating against him and his work.

Since Friday, Luna’s thread has sparked conversation throughout the industry. Former Image publisher Erik Larsen tweeted, “The only partner involved with approving Image central books is Eric Stephenson and crying racism and taking to twitter is a classless move and absolutely unfounded.”
When reached via e-mail by The Beat, a spokesperson for Image Comics said the publisher has no comment on Luna’s claims. (However, Image had earlier submitted and then withdrawn a response to other media outlets.)
In addition to reaching out to Image Comics for comment, The Beat reached out to Luna via e-mail to discuss AMERICANIZASIAN, his tweets, why he opened up about the situation on Twitter, and how he plans to move forward.

Samantha Puc: Can you describe the content of AMERICANIZASIAN?
Joshua Luna: AMERICANIZASIAN is an original graphic novel that collects my online comic strips exploring Filipino American and Asian American identity through fictional and non-fictional situations based on my observations, struggles, and experiences, particularly from my point of view as a comic creator. The book also includes new, never-before-seen content that tie all the strips into an overall narrative, documenting my journey of self-actualization and self-love as I learn to dissect and embrace my Filipino/Asian identity after a lifetime of being taught to do the opposite.

Puc: Do you think the content of this book differs from other politically-minded comics that hit shelves lately?
Luna: From what I’ve seen, my book is a little unusual because it blends the genres of autobiographical memoir, political cartoons, and comic books. Each strip tackles a complex and difficult topic about the Asian American experience and condenses it onto a single page, and I can’t say I’ve seen that done before.

What’s also unusual is my audience. Since my background is in the comic book world, these strips were originally geared toward comic book readers. But over time, I’ve been surprised to be approached by so many educators who’ve told me they share my comics with their students and greatly enjoy the engaging discussions that result. So I think AMERICANIZASIAN can act as a bridge between the comic book and academic world, which is exciting. It’s like halo-halo—many disparate layers of ingredients blended together into one delicious treat.

Puc: When did you first pitch AMERICANIZASIAN to Image and what was the initial response?
Luna: I pitched AMERICANIZASIAN to an Image partner in the beginning of April, and the first response was… silence. I actually had to follow up to get an answer, and this became a reoccurring theme throughout our exchange. His answer was what I documented in the Twitter thread. As the discussion progressed, I had to repeatedly explain why this book had an audience, a story, and a positive tone and purpose. No matter what I said, it seemed the partner wanted to reject the book altogether and make me start over from scratch, but somehow make it my decision instead of his.

Puc: How was the response to this book different from the response to your previous work?
Luna: Very different, and I even said so in my conversation with the partner. Ever since I published my first book with Image, Ultra, in 2004, Image has promptly and enthusiastically greenlit my books. After Girls and The Sword, it got to a point where the partner explicitly stated that he didn’t even need to see sample pages for my pitches because I’m not new and he’s familiar with my work. When I pitched AMERICANIZASIAN, I provided samples anyway—since the content and format was different than what I had previously done—but he still needed more. Nothing I said or showed him ever seemed enough.
It’s worth noting that Ultra, whose protagonist is a Latina superheroine named Pearl Penalosa, explored the idolatry of celebrity by parodying superheroes. In 2019 this might seem blasé, but in 2004 it was borderline sacrilegious, particularly for a debut comic author. Not only did Image not push back, they loved it.
So when it comes to parodying superheroes, I guess you could say I’m just returning to my roots—only this time, with a Filipino American protagonist.

Puc: When were you told your work would be removed from digital platforms? Were you given a reason for why?
Luna: As I mentioned in my thread, two days after a heated exchange with the Image partner about AMERICANIZASIAN, I was notified that my bestselling series would be burned. Burning books is normal to reduce storage costs, but this notice was unusual in several ways. First, it was an automated email with no person attached, it was labeled “time sensitive” with burning scheduled to take place within 2 weeks, and it was set to happen whether I agreed to it or not. Also, for the first time, it said that after the books were destroyed, Image would remove the series from ComiXology, effectively ending digital sales of the series and my royalties.
When I asked Image [about it], I was told that the notice was just unfortunate timing and part of an ongoing process that had nothing to do with our separate conversation about my current project.

Puc: What made you decide to open up about this on Twitter?
Luna: Being labeled as “angry” and “negative” so many times was very isolating, especially when both the cover and the book as a whole have been a source of joy and catharsis for me, and have helped me build an incredible community of supportive fans. I waited 30 years to talk about these thoughts and experiences, and it felt like I was being asked to retreat back into silence. The constant pushback over the course of two months made my world feel small.
But when I realized Image was not being forthcoming in moving my project forward (even after I promptly and thoroughly provided them a list of strips that may pose a legal problem) and the conversations were becoming increasingly contentious, I knew my career was already in jeopardy whether I stayed silent or chose to speak up. My options were dwindling.

Ultimately, I knew I couldn’t get help if I didn’t ask for it. I just had to believe that the community of people who’ve enjoyed my strips would be there for me, and they were. The outpouring of support over the past few days has been overwhelming. Image has been my home since 2004, but maybe I’d found a new kind of home without even realizing it.

Puc: What are you hoping for in a resolution to this issue?
Luna: Within hours of going public with what happened, I received an email from the partner describing my post as slander, libel and outright lying. So honestly, the first thing I’m hoping for is to not get sued for speaking truthfully about how I was mistreated.

The next thing I want is to not get blacklisted. I think comics and the media industry as a whole has been dragging its feet in acknowledging the history and severity of anti-Asian narratives and imagery, to the point where it’d rather kill the messenger than acknowledge the message.
I also don’t want to be discarded so that later on someone else who’s “less angry” gets the opportunity to tell my story, especially if that person has white heritage. That’d only add insult to injury.
Overall, what I want is what I’ve wanted from the start: searching for a home to publish AMERICANIZASIAN so that I can tell my story in my own words.

Puc: Do you have plans to publish AMERICANIZASIAN solo or through another company?
Luna: I have no firm plans yet, but I promised my fans long ago to get this book into their hands, and I’m still determined to make that happen. In the meantime, I’d really appreciate support through Patreon or donations through PayPal. I want to thank everyone who’s pledged or donated so that I can continue creating and making these comic strips. Your support means so much to me.

Puc: Is there anything else you’d like to add?
Luna: It’s important to remember why these difficult conversations are so necessary. Anti-Asian content brings harm to Asian Americans in real life, such as bullying, poor mental health, and even violent domestic and foreign policy. And because positive Asian American media is so rare (especially for Southeast Asians, as East Asian representation is often the default for what little we’re given), many Asian Americans are forced to absorb this hate in silence and internalize it to the point of believing that it’s true. This leads to many Asian Americans erasing ourselves, even in our own stories, and that’s exactly what AMERICANIZASIAN seeks to examine and undo.
But I’m trying to get this book made in an industry where the first most likely Asian superhero protagonist we’ll see on the big screen is the son of one of the worst Asian caricatures in history, Fu Manchu. An industry where a white writer pretended to be Japanese for years, taking opportunities away from actual Asian writers, and was promoted to Editor-in-Chief anyway. An industry that has a deeply hurtful, deeply embedded anti-Asian problem both on the page and off.
The question is, is the industry ready to change? Or is it going to continue to silence Asians for being “angry”?

Luna’s cover for AMERICANIZASIAN is below, as well as preview pages from the collection. Luna notes that each of the strips below were completed before he pitched the book to Image Comics, and that they do not depict anyone specific.

The front cover:
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KimCoppolaAficionado

The most underrated actor of the 21st century
kiwifarms.net
Joshua Luna appeared in an article complaining how Image Comics doesn’t want to publish his comic and cried “racism”!



The front cover:
View attachment 784526
So what is the comic about? Because, although Image is willing to publish a lot of stuff, given that (judging by the cover and the cow in general), "Flips are the most powerful race in the universe, all Asians who don't suck our dicks are race traitors, kill whitey" is too spicy even for them.
...Hey, maybe he should pitch it to Kilomanjaro Orangefalafel (mostly because I want to see those two get into a pissing match over who's more woke/oppressed).
 

c-no

Gluttonous Bed Shitter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joshua Luna appeared in an article complaining how Image Comics doesn’t want to publish his comic and cried “racism”!



The front cover:
View attachment 784526
With a cover like this, it wouldn't be hard to imagine why Image wouldn't be interested in publishing it. Then again, those at Image that were willing to take a look into thought that this would be too much for them even if they could handle the cover.
 

Burning Fanatic

Lvl. 12 Necroposter
Global Moderator
True & Honest Fan
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With a cover like this, it wouldn't be hard to imagine why Image wouldn't be interested in publishing it. Then again, those at Image that were willing to take a look into thought that this would be too much for them even if they could handle the cover.
According to them, they were worried about potential legal issues based on some of the characters he put on the cover. And Image apparently has a bad history of dealing with those sorts of legal troubles from bigger comics companies.
 

Next Task

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
So what is the comic about?

Looks like it's 'I'm too awesome for you to comprehend, you white racist scum. Everything you like is shit and racist, so give me money.'

So another minority wokefest with no selling capability. If he's so awesome, he should crowdfund it. See who really wants to buy his attack on his customer base. Of course, he's been giving away the same storyline of 'everyone is racist except me, every bad experience in my life is because of racists, I've never done anything wrong' for years, so I don't think he'd get many people willing to pay for it. Still, Kwanzaa's SuperBlack comics get funded, so he might find an audience.
 

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