Julian Assange has been charged, prosecutors reveal inadvertently in court filing -

repentance

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
By Matt Zapotosky and
Devlin Barrett
November 15 at 11:19 PM
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged under seal, prosecutors inadvertently revealed in a recently unsealed court filing — a development that could significantly advance the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election and have major implications for those who publish government secrets.

The disclosure came in a filing in a case unrelated to Assange. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kellen S. Dwyer, urging a judge to keep the matter sealed, wrote that “due to the sophistication of the defendant and the publicity surrounding the case, no other procedure is likely to keep confidential the fact that Assange has been charged.” Later, Dwyer wrote the charges would “need to remain sealed until Assange is arrested.”

Dwyer is also assigned to the WikiLeaks case. People familiar with the matter said what Dwyer was disclosing was true, but unintentional.

Joshua Stueve, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in the Eastern District of Virginia said, “The court filing was made in error. That was not the intended name for this filing.”

An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment.

Federal prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia have long been investigating Assange and, in the Trump administration, had begun taking a second look at whether to charge members of the WikiLeaks organization for the 2010 leak of diplomatic cables and military documents that the anti-secrecy group published. Investigators also had explored whether WikiLeaks could face criminal liability for the more recent revelation of sensitive CIA cybertools.

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III also has explored WikiLeaks’ publication of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the account of Hillary Clinton’s then-campaign chairman, John D. Podesta. Officials have alleged that the emails were hacked by Russian spies and transferred to WikiLeaks.

[In email to Trump’s campaign strategist, Roger Stone implied he knew of WikiLeaks’s plans]

Mueller also has been exploring, among other things, communications between the group and associates of President Trump, including political operative Roger Stone and commentator and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi.

In July, Mueller’s office charged 12 Russian military spies with conspiring to hack DNC computers, stealing the organization’s data and publishing the files in an effort to disrupt the election, and referred in an indictment to WikiLeaks, described only as “Organization 1,” as the platform the Russians used to release the stolen emails.

A spokesman for the special counsel’s office declined to comment.

It was not immediately clear what charges Assange would face. In the past, prosecutors had contemplated pursuing a case involving conspiracy, theft of government property or violating the Espionage Act. But whether to charge the WikiLeaks founder was hardly a foregone conclusion. In the Obama administration, the Justice Department had concluded that pursuing Assange would be akin to prosecuting a news organization. In the Trump administration, though, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions had taken a more aggressive stance and vowed to crack down on all government leaks.

Barry J. Pollack, one of Assange’s attorneys, said, “The only thing more irresponsible than charging a person for publishing truthful information would be to put in a public filing information that clearly was not intended for the public and without any notice to Mr. Assange. Obviously, I have no idea if he has actually been charged or for what, but the notion that the federal criminal charges could be brought based on the publication of truthful information is an incredibly dangerous precedent to set.”

The filing in the Eastern District of Virginia came Aug. 22 in a case that combines national security and sex trafficking. Seitu Sulayman Kokayi, 29, was charged with enticing a 15-year-old girl to have sex with him and send him pornographic images of herself. But he was detained in part because he “has a substantial interest in terrorist acts,” according to the court filing.

His father-in-law, according to the filing, has been convicted of terrorist acts. The case involves previously classified information, according to government filings, and prosecutors plan to use information obtained under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Kokayi was indicted last week and is set to be arraigned Friday morning.

[Analysis: A timeline of the Roger Stone-WikiLeaks question]

The case had been sealed until early September, though by itself it attracted little notice. On Thursday evening, Seamus Hughes, deputy director of the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, who is known for scrubbing court filings, joked about the apparent error on Twitter — which first brought it to the attention of reporters.

Even if he is charged, Assange’s coming to the United States to face trial is no sure thing. Since June 2012, Assange has been living in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London, afraid that if he steps outside he will be arrested.

When he first sought asylum in the embassy, he was facing possible extradition to Sweden in a sex crimes case. He has argued that case was a pretext for what he predicted would be his arrest and extradition to the United States.

In the years since, the Swedish case has been closed, but Assange has said he cannot risk leaving the embassy because the United States would attempt to have him arrested and extradited for disclosures of U.S. government secrets. Throughout that time, the United States has refused to say whether there are any sealed charges against Assange.

If Assange were to leave the embassy and be arrested by British authorities, he would likely still fight extradition in the British courts.

Rachel Weiner and Ellen Nakashima contributed to this report.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/julian-assange-has-been-charged-prosecutors-reveal-in-inadvertent-court-filing/2018/11/15/9902e6ba-98bd-48df-b447-3e2a4638f05a_story.html?noredirect=on

http://archive.fo/bQrJC

By
Aruna Viswanatha and
Ryan Dube
Nov. 15, 2018 6:05 p.m. ET

The Justice Department is preparing to prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and is increasingly optimistic it will be able to get him into a U.S. courtroom, according to people in Washington familiar with the matter.

Over the past year, U.S. prosecutors have discussed several types of charges they could potentially bring against Mr. Assange, the people said. Mr. Assange has lived in the Ecuadorean embassy in London since receiving political asylum from the South American country in 2012.


The people familiar with the case wouldn’t describe whether discussions were under way with the U.K. or Ecuador about Mr. Assange, but said they were encouraged by recent developments.

Ecuador’s relationship with Mr. Assange has deteriorated sharply since last year’s election of President Lenin Moreno, who has described him as a “stone in our shoe” and said his continued presence at the embassy is unsustainable.

An indictment from special counsel Robert Mueller that portrayed WikiLeaks as a tool of Russian intelligence for releasing thousands of hacked Democratic emails during the 2016 presidential campaign has made it more difficult for Mr. Assange to mount a defense as a journalist. Public opinion of Mr. Assange in the U.S. has dropped since the campaign.

Prosecutors have considered publicly indicting Mr. Assange to try to trigger his removal from the embassy, the people said, because a detailed explanation of the evidence against Mr. Assange could give Ecuadorean authorities a reason to turn him over.

The exact charges Justice Department might pursue remain unclear, but they may involve the Espionage Act, which criminalizes the disclosure of national defense-related information.

In an interview last week, the head of the Justice Department’s national security division, John Demers, declined to comment on the possibility of prosecuting Mr. Assange, saying, “On that, I’ll just say, ‘we’ll see.’”

Ecuador has been looking to improve relations with the U.S., hosting Vice President Mike Pence in 2018 amid interest in increasing trade.

Ecuador’s Foreign Relations Ministry declined to comment. This month, Foreign Relations Minister José Valencia told a radio station the government hadn’t received an extradition request for Mr. Assange.

Mr. Assange has clashed with his Ecuadorean hosts over internet access, visitors, his cat and other issues. Last month, he sued Ecuador over the conditions of his confinement. At a hearing last month, at which a judge rejected Mr. Assange’s claims, Mr. Assange said he expected to be forced out of the embassy soon.

A lawyer for Mr. Assange, Barry Pollack, said he hadn’t heard a prosecution was in the works.

“We have heard nothing from authorities suggesting that a criminal case against Mr. Assange is imminent,” Mr. Pollack said. “Prosecuting someone for publishing truthful information would set a terrible and dangerous precedent.”

The U.S. hasn’t publicly commented on whether it has made, or plans to make, any extradition request. Any extradition request from the U.S. would likely go to British authorities, who have an outstanding arrest warrant for Mr. Assange related to a Swedish sexual assault case. Sweden has since dropped the probe, but the arrest warrant stands.

Any extradition and prosecution would involve multiple sensitive negotiations within the U.S. government and with other countries.


Mr. Moreno, who was vice president when the country granted Mr. Assange asylum, likely wants to avoid being blamed if the WikiLeaks founder is imprisoned and has repeatedly said he wouldn’t hand him over to a country with the death penalty. Ecuador granted Mr. Assange citizenship in December, thinking he could then leave the embassy if he had diplomatic status, but the British government said that wouldn’t protect him from arrest if he stepped outside the building.

The Justice Department has investigated Mr. Assange for years, beginning in 2010 after disclosures by WikiLeaks of thousands of classified Afghan War reports and other material, for which former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning was found guilty at a court-martial.

Under the Obama administration, then-Attorney General Eric Holder drew a distinction between WikiLeaks and news organizations, saying WikiLeaks didn’t deserve the same First Amendment protections. Investigators, however, were unable to uncover evidence that Mr. Assange had induced Ms. Manning to leak the documents and didn’t bring a prosecution.

President Trump has sent conflicting messages about Mr. Assange, saying “I love WikiLeaks” during the 2016 campaign and praising the group after its disclosures of the hacked Democratic National Committee emails.

Longtime Trump adviser Roger Stone told an associate earlier this year he was working to get Mr. Assange a blanket pardon from Mr. Trump, according to text messages reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. He wrote editorials and publicly advocated for such a pardon, though he told the Journal that he had never discussed his efforts with the president.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, however, said last year when he was CIA director that WikiLeaks is akin to a foreign “hostile intelligence service” and a U.S. adversary. Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Mr. Assange’s arrest was a “priority.”

The Trump Justice Department has considered several potential cases against Mr. Assange, including prosecuting him in connection with the cables Ms. Manning provided and his more recent involvement in the DNC disclosures. Prosecutors have also considered tying Mr. Assange to foreign intelligence services, people familiar with the discussions said.

Mr. Mueller obtained an indictment earlier this year against a dozen Russian officers accused of hacking into Democrats’ computer networks and staging the release of the documents, including through WikiLeaks, during the 2016 campaign.

After a series of criminal cases against Russian and other foreign intelligence officers, U.S. officials have grown more comfortable with disclosing the sensitive material required for such prosecutions, people familiar with the matter said. Prosecutors would need to rely on such evidence if they wanted to portray Mr. Assange as an agent of a foreign government.

In October, a judge threw out the lawsuit Mr. Assange had filed against Ecuador to prevent the government from implementing stricter rules for his stay.

Ecuador issued a written document saying that while at the embassy, Mr. Assange is prohibited from political activities that could affect Ecuador’s relations with other nations. It also said the embassy would provide Mr. Assange with Wi-Fi, but he had to pay for phone calls and other communication.

His visitors would need to provide the embassy with information about cellphones and social media activities, the government said.

The rules also include housekeeping duties Ecuador says are needed to create a “harmonious relationship” between Mr. Assange and embassy staff. Mr. Assange and his guests will need to clean the bathroom, the document said, and the WikiLeaks founder must feed and clean up after his cat.

“Ecuador hasn’t violated the rights of anyone,” Attorney General Íñigo Salvador said after the court ruling. “It has provided asylum to Mr. Assange, and he should comply with the rules to live harmoniously inside Ecuador’s public installations in London.”

Assange’s attorneys said they would appeal the ruling.

Ecuador issued its rules seven months after the Foreign Relations Ministry cut Mr. Assange’s internet connection at the embassy in response to his criticism of Britain on social media for expelling Russian diplomats for the poisoning of a former Russian spy.

—Dustin Volz and Shelby Holliday contributed to this article.

http://archive.fo/siT9W

Guardian article with court document embedded.

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/nov/16/julian-assange-charged-in-secret-mistake-on-us-court-filing-suggests

http://archive.fo/appHq

scribd link to document

https://www.scribd.com/document/393346348/USA-v-Kokayi-inc-reference-to-Assange#from_embed
 
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Sweet and Savoury

Null-like homunculus
kiwifarms.net
Holy hells...

How long is Mueller going to drag this shit out? Its been two years and we shit have jack shit but the MSM won't stop talking about it. That im-peachment is coming any day now...any day...




any day....




right?







I kinda do wonder if Mueller's trying to do a reverse Comey and hang on until the 2020 elections to try to drop some H-bombs on Trumps campaign?
 

RadicalCentrist

kiwifarms.net
leak of diplomatic cables and military documents that the anti-secrecy group published. Investigators also had explored whether WikiLeaks could face criminal liability for the more recent revelation of sensitive CIA cybertools.
:story:
Revealing how badly you are getting spied on by your own government amounts to being an "anti-secrecy" group

Miniluv here we come!
 

nonvir_1984

kiwifarms.net
Hey folks.
You prob. know that Assange had Ecudorian citizenship and asulum withdrawn, was manhandled from the Ecudorian embassy...appeared in court for skipping bail, but then the US said it's seeking extradition. Here's the link to the indictment: https://www.justice.gov/usao-edva/pr/wikileaks-founder-charged-computer-hacking-conspiracy - just scroll down. Turns out the Swedish woman who said he raped her, now wants that case re-opened.
Just shows that what Assange said all along about the fact these cases were ploys to give him into the hands of the US is true.
Assange is a narcissistic drongo in my "professional" opinion. In that font of truth, wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_Assange, the man is one fucked up bit of work. I think he would have a red hot chance of succeeding with an insanity defense!
 

Medicated

Not the fun kind
kiwifarms.net
Hey folks.
You prob. know that Assange had Ecudorian citizenship and asulum withdrawn, was manhandled from the Ecudorian embassy...appeared in court for skipping bail, but then the US said it's seeking extradition. Here's the link to the indictment: https://www.justice.gov/usao-edva/pr/wikileaks-founder-charged-computer-hacking-conspiracy - just scroll down. Turns out the Swedish woman who said he raped her, now wants that case re-opened.
Just shows that what Assange said all along about the fact these cases were ploys to give him into the hands of the US is true.
Assange is a narcissistic drongo in my "professional" opinion. In that font of truth, wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_Assange, the man is one fucked up bit of work. I think he would have a red hot chance of succeeding with an insanity defense!
Everyone knew the whole thing was just an excuse made up to try and get Assange into the FBI and CIA's grubby hands so they could finally stop him from letting people know the the internationally law breaking stuff they get up to on the regular. Turns out if you are paranoid, they may actually be out to get you.
 

nonvir_1984

kiwifarms.net
Everyone knew the whole thing was just an excuse made up to try and get Assange into the FBI and CIA's grubby hands so they could finally stop him from letting people know the the internationally law breaking stuff they get up to on the regular. Turns out if you are paranoid, they may actually be out to get you.
True. and True. But now here's the proof. Assange may be a paranoid shit-smearing narcissist, but he was on the money. As we all thought.
what I don't quite get is why he spent six or so years holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy, when he was only facing a max of 5 in the US and maybe not even 6 months in Sweden.
 

polonium

By your genders combined, I am Captain Tumblr
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
True. and True. But now here's the proof. Assange may be a paranoid shit-smearing narcissist, but he was on the money. As we all thought.
what I don't quite get is why he spent six or so years holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy, when he was only facing a max of 5 in the US and maybe not even 6 months in Sweden.
lol if you think he was only going to do five years in the US.
 
True. and True. But now here's the proof. Assange may be a paranoid shit-smearing narcissist, but he was on the money. As we all thought.
what I don't quite get is why he spent six or so years holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy, when he was only facing a max of 5 in the US and maybe not even 6 months in Sweden.
Lol sure they're not gonna keep coming up with more charges or just have him commit suicide...
 
Reactions: nonvir_1984

nonvir_1984

kiwifarms.net
lol if you think he was only going to do five years in the US.
That's what the papers here were saying was the max for the charges so far liad. In truth, I have not checked.
Just did - Left wing rag, I know:
Assange, 47, is charged with one count of conspiracy to commit computer intrusion. He faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison if convicted, though he may yet face additional charges. So, the papers I saw earlier were talking about the charges so far. If other charges are laid then he might be away for a long time. Maybe they will put him in with the unabomber....
 

nonvir_1984

kiwifarms.net
Assange is the idiot who continues to give:

723882

Quote: In the end, the man who reportedly smeared feces on the walls of his lodgings, mistreated his kitten, and variously blamed the ills of the world on feminists and bespectacled Jewish writers was pulled from the Ecuadorian embassy looking every inch like a powdered-sugar Saddam Hussein plucked straight from his spider hole.
Actually, for me it was the mistreatment of animals that did it.
 
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