JY's Munchie Saga - Yaniv & health, disability, and the healthcare industry

Ellesse_warrior

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Misdiagnosis does happen. There is a lot of confusion about the differences between IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), such as Crohn's. Both can cause rectal bleeding, though. Even doctors can get confused - prescribing NSAIDs for IBD sufferers, which is a complete no-no as they can cause a flare-up.
There's definite tests for crohns though and I'm sure he would've been tested if the Doc's thought he had it.
 
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Odessa Norwood

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There's definite tests for crohns though and I'm sure he would've been tested if the Doc's thought he had it.
Not really, there's no one single test for Crohn's. If you're lucky, there's active inflammation in the bowel when you have your colonoscopy. An ESR blood test just shows that there is inflammation somewhere in the body, but not where it is. Barium meals and/or enemas are also used as a diagnostic tool. You normally have to have all of these tests before a diagnosis is given, and none of them are cheap. I'm not sure whether health insurance would cover these tests in Canada.

I'm sure we'd have heard if Johnny boy had had to have a colonoscopy or a barium enema, given his propensity for sticking things up his arse.
 

Ellesse_warrior

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Not really, there's no one single test for Crohn's. If you're lucky, there's active inflammation in the bowel when you have your colonoscopy. An ESR blood test just shows that there is inflammation somewhere in the body, but not where it is. Barium meals and/or enemas are also used as a diagnostic tool. You normally have to have all of these tests before a diagnosis is given, and none of them are cheap. I'm not sure whether health insurance would cover these tests in Canada.

I'm sure we'd have heard if Johnny boy had had to have a colonoscopy or a barium enema, given his propensity for sticking things up his arse.
So you're suggesting he has crohns because he's a jew but that he didn't get any of the tests done to dx crohns.
 

LateNightMuffin

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Not really, there's no one single test for Crohn's.
There are some specific tests. they can take a biopsy of any of your sores, and if it is Crohn's disease there will most likely be granulomas. As Johns Hopkins reports "Pathologically, Crohn's disease features mucosal discontinuity, transmural involvement, and granulomas, whereas ulcerative colitis does not. Crypt abscesses and granulomas are present only in Crohn's disease." Note also the discontinuity: the inflamed areas can be a patchwork, as opposed to continuous, which is another part of the differential diagnosis.

don't want to powerlevel, but trust me on this one.
 

Odessa Norwood

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So you're suggesting he has crohns because he's a jew but that he didn't get any of the tests done to dx crohns.
No, that's not what I am saying at all. Misdiagnosis of IBD as IBS is much more common than you would imagine. When you first see your doctor, you will normally be told that you have IBS, given some tablets, and told to come back if you don't get better. Repeat for various different meds. Eventually you will get referred to a consultant for tests. If the disease is inactive when you have your tests, then you will be told again that you have IBS.

Given his ancestry, I'm surprised that he was diagnosed with IBS.
 

pr3nt177

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I reckon this waste of space has had every medical test known to man (except an MRI according to him), if not by personal request then by his Dr just to get him the hell out of his office.
 

wabbits

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I've missed his claiming to have IBS. Can someone give me a link or a timeframe + thread for that? I'd like to add it to the monitor.
 

Ellesse_warrior

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No, that's not what I am saying at all. Misdiagnosis of IBD as IBS is much more common than you would imagine. When you first see your doctor, you will normally be told that you have IBS, given some tablets, and told to come back if you don't get better. Repeat for various different meds. Eventually you will get referred to a consultant for tests. If the disease is inactive when you have your tests, then you will be told again that you have IBS.

Given his ancestry, I'm surprised that he was diagnosed with IBS.
Is that what happened to you?
 
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What This Old Thing!?

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Tweeter "Crusted Nerd" (fixed the name in edit) posted this conversation between Yaniv and young MandaPandaGrr where he explains his "intersex condition".
 

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pr3nt177

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Tweeter "Crusted Nerd" (fixed the name in edit) posted this conversation between Yaniv and young MandaPandaGrr where he explains his "intersex condition".
How old are these messages do you know? (they're confusing if recent)...he believes he has no male genitalia, therefore, tells others he hasn't any...doesn't exactly gel with what he told BCHRT in July 2019, and even on Twitter, where he claims he has both sets.

I can't believe I'm discussing this mans "uterus" but for argument's sake... if he has an inactive uterus then he can't have periods. He's 32yo and is trying to say that, after a lifetime of being "female" (and always at the docs) and using pads etc he doesn't know if it's inactive or not? ROFLMAO. His stupidity and ignorance are astounding.

He lies and tries to con so much he doesn't know himself whether he's Arthur or Martha anymore.


ETA: I bet his aunty will be pleased to see how her health/medical issues are being blasted worldwide.

His command of the English language is so poor that I'm not sure if his aunty has an inactive uterus or has a dick she refuses to acknowledge. It appears being a mutant runs in the family...family photos should be an eye-opener.
 
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Second Hand Syringe

My blood is poison
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Tweeter "Crusted Nerd" (fixed the name in edit) posted this conversation between Yaniv and young MandaPandaGrr where he explains his "intersex condition".
I don't believe for a second that he has some kind of mangled female reproductive system hidden under that gut. More bullshit from a pathological liar. Intersex genetic anomalies of that type are so incredibly rare, but psychological disease is rather common by comparison. I think his main issue is his broken brain; his poor physical health can be explained as stemming from unstable mental health. He's insane and most of his diseases are lifestyle related - no uterus required.
 

Positron

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Off-topic:

Pardon the interruption. I'm seeking consults with medical kiwis on an MRI image of Yaniv's brain. Ventricles seem rather large. Educating us on JY's Munchie Saga thread would be widely appreciated. In other news, our perving chubbums is making a show of contemplating GRS for real and misreading the dilation efforts he must undertake.

I return you to our regular RTC programming...
This is a Sagittal T1 MRI of the brain under low resolution. The part with the measurement is not the ventricle, but where the cerebellum should be. I too am baffled by it but I guess it is just a badly-positioned scan. An arachnid cyst in the posterior fossa is a possibility (whether such a cyst is harmless or not requires neurology consult). It is definitely not hemorrhage (which is very white on T1). Otherwise no obvious abnormality.
 

wabbits

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This is a Sagittal T1 MRI of the brain under low resolution. The part with the measurement is not the ventricle, but where the cerebellum should be. I too am baffled by it but I guess it is just a badly-positioned scan. An arachnid cyst in the posterior fossa is a possibility (whether such a cyst is harmless or not requires neurology consult). It is definitely not hemorrhage (which is very white on T1). Otherwise no obvious abnormality.

Awesome comment. Makes some sense out of Yaniv's speddy sperging all these months, too, including why his neurosurgeon consult got scheduled for summer 2020. Following your link, I found:

"Arachnoid cysts are benign, and the vast majority remain asymptomatic throughout life. If they are deemed to be causing symptoms, then surgery can be contemplated. This can either take the form of a craniotomy (fenestration or excision) or placement of a cystoperitoneal shunt."​

So maybe that's what he peeped out on his chart - a consideration of whether the cyst should be drained.

Edit: The MRI is on another thread, so for your reading convenience, here's the image @Positron commented on:

Screen Shot 2019-11-20 at 6.15.54 PM.png
It was brought to the Farms by @cloneconspiracy on the main thread here.
 
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Sevenatenine

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This is a Sagittal T1 MRI of the brain under low resolution. The part with the measurement is not the ventricle, but where the cerebellum should be. I too am baffled by it but I guess it is just a badly-positioned scan. An arachnid cyst in the posterior fossa is a possibility (whether such a cyst is harmless or not requires neurology consult). It is definitely not hemorrhage (which is very white on T1). Otherwise no obvious abnormality.
Idly curious and out of my area, but could that white spot be a calcified tumour (pineal, but looks too far away or on the thalamus?)

His previous talk about "brain tumour" instantly made me think "incidentaloma"...

All the commentary on the cerebellum is interesting, I thought is was just the slice angle...but it was very hard to compare this scan on Dr. Google.
 

Allakazam223

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Idle musing: a Dandy Walker malformation?

The symptoms would fit - low IQ, seizures, hydrocephalus, issues with movement.
Not a doc, heres the first image result. Anyone qualified to compare?
 

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wabbits

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Fuckin A.

Dandy-Walker for the rest of us:
Dandy-Walker malformation affects brain development, primarily development of the cerebellum, which is the part of the brain that coordinates movement. In individuals with this condition, various parts of the cerebellum develop abnormally, resulting in malformations that can be observed with medical imaging. The central part of the cerebellum (the vermis) is absent or very small and may be abnormally positioned. The right and left sides of the cerebellum may be small as well. In affected individuals, a fluid-filled cavity between the brainstem and the cerebellum (the fourth ventricle) and the part of the skull that contains the cerebellum and the brainstem (the posterior fossa) are abnormally large. These abnormalities often result in problems with movement, coordination, intellect, mood, and other neurological functions.

In the majority of individuals with Dandy-Walker malformation, signs and symptoms caused by abnormal brain development are present at birth or develop within the first year of life. Some children have a buildup of fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus) that may cause increased head size (macrocephaly). Up to half of affected individuals have intellectual disability that ranges from mild to severe, and those with normal intelligence may have learning disabilities. Children with Dandy-Walker malformation often have delayed development, particularly a delay in motor skills such as crawling, walking, and coordinating movements. People with Dandy-Walker malformation may experience muscle stiffness and partial paralysis of the lower limbs (spastic paraplegia), and they may also have seizures. While rare, hearing and vision problems can be features of this condition.

Less commonly, other brain abnormalities have been reported in people with Dandy-Walker malformation. These abnormalities include an underdeveloped or absent tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain (agenesis of the corpus callosum), a sac-like protrusion of the brain through an opening at the back of the skull (occipital encephalocele), or a failure of some nerve cells (neurons) to migrate to their proper location in the brain during development. These additional brain malformations are associated with more severe signs and symptoms.

Dandy-Walker malformation typically affects only the brain, but problems in other systems can include heart defects, malformations of the urogenital tract, extra fingers or toes (polydactyly) or fused fingers or toes (syndactyly), or abnormal facial features.

In 10 to 20 percent of people with Dandy-Walker malformation, signs and symptoms of the condition do not appear until late childhood or into adulthood. These individuals typically have a different range of features than those affected in infancy, including headaches, an unsteady walking gait, paralysis of facial muscles (facial palsy), increased muscle tone, muscle spasms, and mental and behavioral changes. Rarely, people with Dandy-Walker malformation have no health problems related to the condition.

Problems related to hydrocephalus or complications of its treatment are the most common cause of death in people with Dandy-Walker malformation.

Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum (an area at the back of the brain that controls movement) and the fluid filled spaces around it.

The key features of this syndrome are an enlargement of the fourth ventricle (a small channel that allows fluid to flow freely between the upper and lower areas of the brain and spinal cord), a partial or complete absence of the cerebellar vermis (the area between the two cerebellar hemispheres), and cyst formation near the internal base of the skull. An increase in the size of the fluid spaces surrounding the brain as well as an increase in pressure may also be present. The syndrome can appear dramatically or develop unnoticed.

Symptoms, which often occur in early infancy, include slow motor development and progressive enlargement of the skull. In older children, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as irritability, vomiting, and convulsions, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction such as unsteadiness, lack of muscle coordination, or jerky movements of the eyes may occur. Other symptoms include increased head circumference, bulging at the back of the skull, problems with the nerves that control the eyes, face and neck, and abnormal breathing patterns. Dandy-Walker Syndrome is frequently associated with disorders of other areas of the central nervous system including absence of the corpus callosum and malformations of the heart, face, limbs, fingers and toes.

The symptoms of Dandy Walker syndrome typically include developmental delay, low tone (hypotonia) or later high tone (spasticity), poor coordination and balance (ataxia), and sometimes enlarged head circumference and increased pressure within the skull due to hydrocephalus. Mental retardation occurs in fewer than half, most often in those with severe hydrocephalus, chromosome abnormalities or other birth defects. Seizures occur in 15-30% of those affected. Respiratory control centers in the brainstem are sometimes affected and can lead to respiratory failure, again most likely with severe hydrocephalus. The age at diagnosis varies depending on the onset and severity of hydrocephalus, and presence of other birth defects or medical problems.

The clinical presentation and imaging features of DWM overlap with isolated cerebellar vermis hypoplasia (CVH) and mega-cisterna magna (MCM), and these have been classified together as a spectrum of anomalies known as the Dandy-Walker complex. But emerging experience suggests that this is an oversimplification that may contribute to inaccurate information about both outcome and genetic risks. CVH consists of a small vermis without the striking upward rotation of the vermis, cystic enlargement of the 4th ventricle or enlarged posterior fossa that characterize typical DWM. This malformation has also been called the “Dandy-Walker variant”, a potentially confusing term. The available data regarding outcome is limited, but this is often more severe than in typical DWM. MCM is characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa despite normal or very nearly normal size of the cerebellum. The increased size is associated with an enlarged fluid collection beneath and often behind the cerebellum. This has been reported as a normal variant, but emerging experience suggests that it may be associated with developmental disabilities although these are usually less severe than seen in DWM or CVH. The uncertainty in prognosis for these three overlapping conditions is accounted for by both natural variability and difficulty in distinguishing them.

General Information
  • The Dandy-Walker syndrome is hydrocephalus associated with a posterior fossa cyst and abnormal development of the cerebellum, a portion of the brain located near the base of the skull and important to voluntary muscle movement, balance and posture.
  • This malformation occurs when openings that allow cerebrospinal fluid to move into the space surrounding the surface of the brain fail to open. The condition may prompt any of a number of brain and central nervous system abnormalities.
  • Hydrocephalus occurs in 90 percent of cases.
Symptoms
  • Symptoms of the Dandy-Walker syndrome depend to some extent on the combination of developmental difficulties in the infant. Increasing head size due to hydrocephalus may be the sole symptom.
  • The normal signs of increased intracranial pressure may be absent in infants because of the head’s ability to grow. In older children, difficulties with balance, mental impairment and double vision can occur.
Diagnosis
  • Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) will show the malformation.
Treatment
  • When treatment is necessary, the posterior fossa cyst needs to be shunted to allow proper flow of cerebrospinal fluid. If there is no communication between the posterior fossa cyst and the lateral ventricles, then the lateral ventricles need to be shunted also.
Outcome
  • The chance of survival is 75 percent to 100 percent. About half of patients have normal IQ. Difficulty with balance, stiffness and poor fine motor control is common. Seizures occur in 15 percent of patients.

Edits: Added more from Dr Google.
 
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Ellesse_warrior

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Only that the MRI he's looking at is from a disc on his home computer, the measurement showing is his own. The software on the disc has a ruler function, that's it. That's all I can say. Also looks like the last image in the series, for whatever that's worth. I'd almost think it's an image farther away from the center if it's the last image in the series? And he has a very fat neck.
I posted it in the munchie megathread too. Cross posting for info.
 
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