Let's talk DVD's - Enhanced with DisneyFastplay!

What is the best format?

  • Vhs

    Votes: 3 12.5%
  • Dvd

    Votes: 13 54.2%
  • Bluray

    Votes: 5 20.8%
  • Gameboy advanced video

    Votes: 10 41.7%

  • Total voters
    24

Syaoran Li

Prime Minister of Ireland
True & Honest Fan
Quality be damned too. And unlike bluray, dvd players are universal so you don't have to worry about an old one not able to play newer disks or....software updates. :stress:

Agreed, although I've noticed some PS2's have difficulty playing certain DVD's from specific companies but those same discs work fine on a normal DVD player or another console that can play DVD's like an Xbox 360 or a PS4.

Heck, you can get a brand new portable DVD player from Amazon for less than $100 USD most of the time.
 

XYZpdq

fbi most wanted sskealeaton
True & Honest Fan
Agreed, although I've noticed some PS2's have difficulty playing certain DVD's from specific companies but those same discs work fine on a normal DVD player or another console that can play DVD's like an Xbox 360 or a PS4.

Heck, you can get a brand new portable DVD player from Amazon for less than $100 USD most of the time.
Yeah ps2 and early units will have issues with the more complicated discs, like if they bounce around to patch in extended scenes, or that Ghostbusters triggered them too I think
 

From The Uncanny Valley

the time is now, the place is here
True & Honest Fan
Agreed, although I've noticed some PS2's have difficulty playing certain DVD's from specific companies but those same discs work fine on a normal DVD player or another console that can play DVD's like an Xbox 360 or a PS4.

Heck, you can get a brand new portable DVD player from Amazon for less than $100 USD most of the time.

Got mine from Walmart on discount for about $50 some years back
 

The Token Ethnic

A Profound Hatred of Man
Walmart sold region-free dvds as well that were unlockable via a code. Troma had great dvd extras such as their Troma Intelligence Test that would either show you a sexy or gory clip depending on your answer.
tit-troma-intelligence-test-1.jpg
 
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XYZpdq

fbi most wanted sskealeaton
True & Honest Fan
Walmart sold region-free dvds as well that were unlockable via a code. Troma had great dvd extras such as their Troma Intelligence Test that would either show you a sexy or gory clip depending on your answer.
View attachment 1829780
Yeah a _lot_ of cheap players had some hidden thing where you put in the a particular sequence in the config menu and you could change the region.
I recall a cheap $50ish one I got probably at Target in the mid00s that went regionless, played vcd, svcd, mp3s, and would even try any random mpg file on a disc that you threw at it.
 

heyitsmike

The beatings will continue until morale improves.
I was disappointed by Blu-ray because I thought they were to be jampacked with special special features that couldn't be on DVD. Maybe at first, but not anymore.
By the time Blu-ray started to gain traction, streaming had already surpassed it. No point in studios spending the effort making content specifically for physical media when most people who consume said media will do so via streaming.
 
You can get a tonne of cheap second-hand DVDs at places like Amazon or at markets (though government lockdowns have done their best to force me to buy from Amazon rather than local markets). You can basically set aside £20 and you have movies and TV to last you for the next two weeks. It depends on your tastes as it will force you to watch a lot of older stuff. So if you want to watch Dear White People or something, you'll have to keep to Netflix. But if you want to spend a night watching The Lion in Winter or Broadchurch or Babylon 5 or The World At War, you're sorted.

You'll be smarter too, at the cost of reduced ability to chat online about {CurrentShow}. But then you don't really need to watch {CurrentShow} to do that anymore anyway. You just quote your favourite reviewer according to what persuasion of political outrage and ranting you prefer. So you know, what are you losing? When there's something special to watch like Cobra Kai, I'll subscribe for a month to whatever service but then I'm done. If you find yourself watching something not because you're interested in it but because you have nothing better to do... then find something better to do.
 

sasazuka

Standing in the school hallway.
My preference is Blu-Ray, especially for movies, but I'm not going to replace 90% of the DVDs I own with Blu-Ray discs since the DVDs are still perfectly watchable on smaller 720p TV screens and I still keep the DVDs of films that I have "upgraded" to Blu-Ray since it's much, much easier to watch DVDs on a laptop. I have an external Blu-Ray drive but I've never been able to play Blu-Rays on a laptop even using VLC.

There are some movies where I still prefer the features on the standard DVD versions of the films compared to Blu-Ray (or even later special edition DVD releases of the same film), with the most obvious example being the original 1999 DVD of Ferris Bueller's Day Off, the only release with the John Hughes director's commentary track as far as I am aware.

Another DVD feature I like on what is otherwise an extremely barebones DVD is on the original 1998 Sony Pictures Home Entertainment DVD release of Wes Anderson's debut film, Bottle Rocket (which later got a Criterion Collection version on Blu-Ray and DVD full of special features). It has the regular widescreen version of the film, but it's a double-sided DVD which also has a 4:3 version for standard definition screens and Bottle Rocket is one of those movies where the 4:3 version isn't pan-and-scan, it's unmatted so you can see more at the top and bottom of the screen than you were intended to see in theatres. It's not much of a bonus but sometimes you can see interesting details missing from the cropped widescreen version such as the McDonald's sign directly behind the motel.
 
While I do enjoy the HD upgrades for some movies, don't get me wrong, I still think that DVD is overall the superior format (barring the region coding bullshit of course). For starters, there are some movies that look like crap in HD because of the "outdated" special effects; some movies just look better not being remastered, and DVD is the format that creates the good middle ground in terms of picture quality.

I've said this around the Farms before, and I'll say it again: The first two Sam Raimi Spidey movies are my favorite blockbuster movies; I own them on several formats. The Spider-Man 2 DVD, however, is the crown jewel of my movie collection. The Spider-Man 2 DVD has roughly a dozen hours worth of extras; all of the behind the scenes and "making of" stuff is just fantastic to watch, and none of those extras made it to the Blu-Ray releases. I also got the Special Edition of this DVD, so I have the nice boxed set full of mini comics, an awesome artbook, postcards, etc.

Decked out releases like this just don't happen with Blu-Rays. I do most certainly have the Spider-Man movies on Blu-Ray as well, but those DVDs, man. They rocked. DVD, in many ways, is the best way to go with movies that you really love.

There's a legit reason why DVDs are starting to climb in price again, too. The streaming game is a bubble that is about to burst. The days of DVDs and torrents are most certainly going to make a comeback.
 

Big Nasty

CYBERGUNT 2021
While I do enjoy the HD upgrades for some movies, don't get me wrong, I still think that DVD is overall the superior format (barring the region coding bullshit of course). For starters, there are some movies that look like crap in HD because of the "outdated" special effects; some movies just look better not being remastered, and DVD is the format that creates the good middle ground in terms of picture quality.

I've said this around the Farms before, and I'll say it again: The first two Sam Raimi Spidey movies are my favorite blockbuster movies; I own them on several formats. The Spider-Man 2 DVD, however, is the crown jewel of my movie collection. The Spider-Man 2 DVD has roughly a dozen hours worth of extras; all of the behind the scenes and "making of" stuff is just fantastic to watch, and none of those extras made it to the Blu-Ray releases. I also got the Special Edition of this DVD, so I have the nice boxed set full of mini comics, an awesome artbook, postcards, etc.

Decked out releases like this just don't happen with Blu-Rays. I do most certainly have the Spider-Man movies on Blu-Ray as well, but those DVDs, man. They rocked. DVD, in many ways, is the best way to go with movies that you really love.

There's a legit reason why DVDs are starting to climb in price again, too. The streaming game is a bubble that is about to burst. The days of DVDs and torrents are most certainly going to make a comeback.
Ok, so why are streaming services about to bust, you think?
 
Ok, so why are streaming services about to bust, you think?
Because there's too many of them at this point, and the amount of them keep growing. Plus, the majority of the streaming-exclusive content is lacking quality. Eventually, people are going to start saying "no" to subscribing to 10 streaming services, possibly paying thousands a year to access all of the content they want.

For instance, The Office was on Netflix for several years, and it remained as one of the top streamed things for years. Then, NBC created their own streaming service, "Peacock," and they took The Office with them. Who wants to pay for Netflix AND Peacock when you can make only one payment on a DVD boxed set of the entire Office series to watch whenever you want? Or even download it through torrents?
 

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