List of books to educate Kids & adults from being crazy/emotional man-childrens.

Devyn

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Gulag Archipelago = Got someone who thinks socialism is a good idea? Show them these three books and see if they change their minds.
In the same vein, Basic Economics by former Marxist Thomas Sowell. He's basically a free market absolutist (I definitely am not), but considering that the average liberal/progressive's understanding of how economies work is disturbingly similar to that of a Cargo Cult member, I think this book should be required reading. All of Sowell's books are worth reading though in my opinion.
 
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Bibendum

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The Adventures of Tintin are great for kids, my dad and I read them all when I was little. They're fun adventure stories with quality illustration, and they touch on real historical events as Tintin travels the world. They're often very funny, and Tintin is an intrepid, resourceful, honorable character. They're age-appropriate without being dumbed down, and if you're feeling particularly anti-woke, you can search for the first two books in the series that are now a bit hard to find due to modern politically correct tastes.
 
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Bogs

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The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris is a great biography of the youth of the giga-chad that was our 26th president. It's also part of a trilogy which charts his entire life, but the first part is a great read for a kid
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas is a great book for kids to show them older books are still easy to read, ditto:
Treasure Island by Robert Lewis Stevenson
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Call of the Wild/White Fang by Jack London
Beowulf
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Hatchet
by Gary Paulson is a great book about survival in the wilderness
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. A dystopian future about a man who burns books for an apathetic civilization
The Hobbit for obvious reasons
The Princess & The Goblin by George MacDonald, a great damsel-in-distress fantasy novel, which influenced J.R.R. Tolkien in his descriptions for goblins
The Once & Future King by T.H. White, a novel which is easy to read and slowly becomes more and more psychologically complex is it progress through the Arthurian legend.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu, a book to read alongside the study of history. ditto The Prince
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
by Fredrick Nietzsche. God is Dead, so do something with your life. A heavier book to discuss with your (older) child about atheism and the often misunderstood concept of nihilism
The Bible whether you believe or not. My mom said to me "If you don't want to believe in God, then at least know what you are talking about."

But in general young boys are looking for a role model in anyone and anything they find. What you do as a parent will be more important than making them read a tome of books. If they don't look up to you, they'll never read what you give them. They'll become what you fear. And that's the punchline
 

HumanHive

Human Behavior is Exceptional Behavior
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Pretty much all of Bradbury's works, they deal with both the human condition and with the danger of the kind of digital soma dystopia TPTB seem to be rolling out.
He’s actually pretty varied. Bradbury is just as comfortable writing about proto-Godzilla as he is writing about how Big Tech hates loners.
 

PS1gamenwatch

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Kosher Dill

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The Bible whether you believe or not.
This is a big one - you really can't be culturally literate in the West if you don't know at least the basics of the Bible. I know people who grew up in irreligious households and went to public schools, and as adults they miss out on a lot of context anytime they visit a historic site or ponder some "inexplicable" thing religious people do.
 

Alexander Thaut

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The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris is a great biography of the youth of the giga-chad that was our 26th president. It's also part of a trilogy which charts his entire life, but the first part is a great read for a kid
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas is a great book for kids to show them older books are still easy to read, ditto:
Treasure Island by Robert Lewis Stevenson
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Call of the Wild/White Fang by Jack London
Beowulf
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Hatchet
by Gary Paulson is a great book about survival in the wilderness
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. A dystopian future about a man who burns books for an apathetic civilization
The Hobbit for obvious reasons
The Princess & The Goblin by George MacDonald, a great damsel-in-distress fantasy novel, which influenced J.R.R. Tolkien in his descriptions for goblins
The Once & Future King by T.H. White, a novel which is easy to read and slowly becomes more and more psychologically complex is it progress through the Arthurian legend.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu, a book to read alongside the study of history. ditto The Prince
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
by Fredrick Nietzsche. God is Dead, so do something with your life. A heavier book to discuss with your (older) child about atheism and the often misunderstood concept of nihilism
The Bible whether you believe or not. My mom said to me "If you don't want to believe in God, then at least know what you are talking about."

But in general young boys are looking for a role model in anyone and anything they find. What you do as a parent will be more important than making them read a tome of books. If they don't look up to you, they'll never read what you give them. They'll become what you fear. And that's the punchline
I'm gonna say throw in any superhero story arc that involves the hero or heroes at their best in terms of their character and perseverence.
Spider-man's got a lot of those moments. But most of the well-known ones do too.

But don't bog them down with actual capeshit. Pick good runs, events, or arcs.


uh anyways I'd also say take your pick of Greco-Roman myth and Arthurian/Charlemagne epics.


Honestly, if we're gonna include old movies on the list,
  • Old movies with John Wayne and/or Jimmy Stewart. They always played men with a code of honor.
  • Almost all of the John Ford directed movies. I think the only shit one was that one where John Wayne played Genghis Khan?
  • Spartacus. It's a fine movie.
  • Hitchcock movies are worthwhile. Some more than others.
  • Soylent Green. Don't spoil it.
  • Any of the 1984 or Andromeda Strain adaptations. Don't spoil them for the kids.
  • Jurassic Park movies. I mean, come on. It's just brainless fun.
  • Star Trek 4. The greatest environmentalist movie of our time.




Other good books, hmn

  • Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott. It's a fun book and has some historical all-stars present in it.
  • Faullkner and Hemingway books are hella solid, although Faulkner's a bit complex for kids to read.
  • Sherlock Holmes stories in general are good. I'd also highly recommend any of the great mystery and detective writers from the early half of the 20th century. The Sam Spade and Philip Marlow hard boiled detective novels are damn fun. Hell, Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer still holds up as fun books.
  • Conan the Barbarian and the rest of that author's "universe". It's fun stuff and the heroes are all macho dudes. Nothing wrong with having some variety.
  • King Solomon's Mines by Haggard. Again, a very solid book albeit a little dense iirc. Also opens up Haggards little universe of sorts. Fun stuff.
  • Edgar Rice Burroughs books in general are a decent time. Tarzan, John Carter, and the Pellucidar books are are all fun.
  • The Sharpe Novels and Horatio Hornblower Novels are decent historical fiction series set in the Napoleonic era.
  • The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man. Now hear me out, a kid or teen may need variety in their school environments in terms of talking about shit and this is a decent and short read. It's narrated by a trickster-ish half black/half white dude who decides that maybe it's best to pass as a white dude and support his family by doing so instead of trying to be a black activist or sth at the time. It's relatively easy to read too.
  • Zane Grey stories. Every lad's gotta pick up some Western novels and stories. There's a lot of good ones but I think Zane Grey's just one of the most solid western and cowboy writers from the old days. I read like 90 of his books in a single year as a teen.
  • War stories- There's a lot of these. Off the top of my head, There's the Red Badge of Courage. It's pretty good. Also, any of Ernie Pyle's books before he got shot in the head in WW2 Italy.
  • The Narnia books are fine. C.S. Lewis's writings are generally solid overall.
  • Anything by Mark Twain. Even his posthumous stuff.
this is a potentially eternal list.
 

IceGray

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I think Robinson Crusoe and Swiss Family Robinsons are appropriate. Maybe survivalism fiction in general.
 

John Andrews Stan

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I, Pencil (there are some decent web video versions on YouTube, too)

The Ethics of Liberty by Murray Rothbard

The Four Love Languages
 

Idiotron

The last sane person on Earth
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There's this classic Polish book called Ferdydurke.
It's about conformity vs individualism.
It's set in a high school and the main cast is kids so other kids might find it easier to identify with them.
It actually helped me become less of a drone.
I know that there's an English translation of it so check it out, it's really good.
 

Android raptor

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The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris is a great biography of the youth of the giga-chad that was our 26th president. It's also part of a trilogy which charts his entire life, but the first part is a great read for a kid
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas is a great book for kids to show them older books are still easy to read, ditto:
Treasure Island by Robert Lewis Stevenson
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Call of the Wild/White Fang by Jack London
Beowulf
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Hatchet
by Gary Paulson is a great book about survival in the wilderness
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. A dystopian future about a man who burns books for an apathetic civilization
The Hobbit for obvious reasons
The Princess & The Goblin by George MacDonald, a great damsel-in-distress fantasy novel, which influenced J.R.R. Tolkien in his descriptions for goblins
The Once & Future King by T.H. White, a novel which is easy to read and slowly becomes more and more psychologically complex is it progress through the Arthurian legend.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu, a book to read alongside the study of history. ditto The Prince
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
by Fredrick Nietzsche. God is Dead, so do something with your life. A heavier book to discuss with your (older) child about atheism and the often misunderstood concept of nihilism
The Bible whether you believe or not. My mom said to me "If you don't want to believe in God, then at least know what you are talking about."

But in general young boys are looking for a role model in anyone and anything they find. What you do as a parent will be more important than making them read a tome of books. If they don't look up to you, they'll never read what you give them. They'll become what you fear. And that's the punchline
Lmao Beowulf is basically the world's oldest Gary-Stu fanfic. Some kids might get a kick out of it, but in the same way they'd get a kick out of Twilight or some 14 year olds fanfic about Stormblood Magicwolf with color-changing eyes and over 9000 powers at Hogwarts.

I thought reading was pretty gay as a kid so I didn't really do much of it, though I did read a bunch of non-fiction science shit. Also read and enjoyed Jurassic Park at 11-ish as well as Raptor Red.

Basically if it involves dinosaurs it's hard to go wrong.
 

Gloomy guest

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"The best models of English writings are Shakespeare and the Old Testament, especially the Book of Job, the Psalms and Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon. it will be a very good thing for you to commit as much as you can both of these books and of the best plays of Shakespeare to memory, so that they form the foundation of your style. In writing English, the most important quality that you can acquire is style. That makes all the difference to anyone who reads what you write, whether you use the best phrases in the best way. You will have to devote some time to grammar and syntax, and also to logic. Logic is the science and the art of using words, and it teaches you to think correctly without making blunders in reasoning, which nowadays everyone is liable to do just because they have not got the training which I am proposing to give you."

Aleister Crowley, in a letter to his son
 

Croan Çhiollee

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I would add some history in as well. So many people I know don't have any clue about the ancient world, or where they come from.
Your ancestry may vary, but I found "The Tribes of Britain" by David Miles a fascinating look into the history of the land I came from, from first settlers to the modern era. It's kind of hard to take current year notions of cultural appropriation seriously when you can reference thousands of years of people doing just that.
Also, just as great stories, pick up the penguin compilation of the Icelandic Sagas, and if you want an amazing read, Njalls Saga is a foundation point of the European novel. Great stories of manhood, with plenty of humour and warmth.
 

HumanHive

Human Behavior is Exceptional Behavior
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Lmao Beowulf is basically the world's oldest Gary-Stu fanfic. Some kids might get a kick out of it, but in the same way they'd get a kick out of Twilight or some 14 year olds fanfic about Stormblood Magicwolf with color-changing eyes and over 9000 powers at Hogwarts.

I thought reading was pretty gay as a kid so I didn't really do much of it, though I did read a bunch of non-fiction science shit. Also read and enjoyed Jurassic Park at 11-ish as well as Raptor Red.

Basically if it involves dinosaurs it's hard to go wrong.
It’s for kids, but Dinotopia is great for worldbuilding and art.
 

Fliddaroonie

I'm a spooky ghost! Whooooo!!! Ectoplasm!!!!
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Ethel and Ernest by Raymond Briggs. The older, original versions of Mallory Towers books by Enid Blyton.

Beowulf, The Hound of the Baskervilles and Dracula. Gullivers Travels.

Giving them books to read is all well and good but don't forget to teach them how to consume media too. Pick apart paper articles, get kids to look at articles covering the same event in different politically biased outlets. Encourage reading between the lines, considering the agenda, what they want you to think and feel should be looked at too.

Never answer a question with "I dont know " or "that's how it is". Encourage the pursuit of ignorance and the courage to admit gaps in your knowledge and the desire to correct that.
 

Android raptor

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Lmao I wonder how many people recommending Beowulf REEEEEEE about the Star Wars sequel trilogy and call Rey a Mary Sue?

Seriously, while I last read it in high school, from what I remember it was basically just a very old Gary Stu power fantasy: dude is this amazing super powerful hero with zero flaws who goes around killing monsters and is beloved by everyone, in the end he dies after nobly fighting the most powerful monster and is mourned by everyone forever. Not that kids shouldn't read it or wouldn't enjoy it (shit 10 year old me would've probably liked it since I had a shitton of Mary Sues at the time, though I probably would've preferred Beowulf being female since most of my Sues then were), just that I wouldn't exactly call it a particularly complicated or nuanced story and hating on shit like the ST but recommending Beowulf is more than a tad hypocritical.

One interesting thing that Beowulf does show is that Mary Sues have been around for a long-ass time, and the desire people have to create them is universal. I highly doubt I was the only 10 year old who created a small army of them, and I think if kids want to create their own Sues, let them go nuts. Most eventually mature out of it with age and eventually learn how to create more complex characters. Not everyone does (Stephanie Meyers sure didn't, not that that stopped her Suefic from making her rich), but most do.

I guess where I'm getting with this is while I think Beowulf is simplistic and low-brow, there isn't necessarily anything wrong with kids consuming media that is and that kids creating their own stories, even cringey Mary Sue power fantasies, is something that should be encouraged.

No way 10 year old me would've read or enjoyed the bible though. I probably would've immediately chucked it at the face of whoever suggested it.