Microsoft Is Making a Secure PC Chip—With Intel and AMD's Help - You will own nothing, and you will be happy

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3119967d0c

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Microsoft attempted this a few years back with Windows 10 S. No one wanted it and only the most unfortunate used it.

Edit: There's an S mode. Just found that out. What kind of nutcase uses a mode that locks you out of installing Cataclysm?
Locking down users to installing only App Store apps makes sense in certain circumstances:
  1. Maybe you're giving a computer to grandma so she can video chat with the grandkids but she has a demonstrated history of not being able to avoid installing invasive malware online, and you can't directly provide technical support without travelling a long way
  2. Maybe you're a small-medium size business that is issuing a laptop to be shared between a number of users for one or two specific apps, and you don't need the drama that comes from them fucking around with it. In that case you can lock things down even further, prevent installation of things they don't need
  3. Maybe you're a large business which has some users, say in the marketing space, which only use SASS webapps for everything- if you can convince them to use a really high end ChromeBook because it's lighter then they will break things less while downloading porn- or execs who can delegate doing actual work on Windows to someone else- this was the early Surface Pro target demo.
 

DNA_JACKED

Pronouns are Ni/Gg/Er: proud transracialwomankin
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i thought the fx lineup was the last one without the amd psp and the fx 8350 was the fastest non-pozzed cpu money could buy... except it's an fx cpu, so...

also i appreciate the sentiment, but of course, microsoft is hellbent on pozzing every single newly manufactured x86 cpu (with intel and amd's permission) from now until the heat death of the universe. eventually you're probably going to have to interact with a pc that's been tainted with this shitty draconian pluton chip. i couldn't find many people talking about this thing, which troubled the hell out of me - this is one of the most insidious things ms has done in years, and it's definitely one of the most evil tech headlines i've seen in a while. i really don't know what i'm going to do about buying a new cpu in the future, the last thing i want in my pc is fucking microsoft silicon. this is fucking palladium all over again and no1 currs

i'm tired of people pretending that ms is benign these days when i think they're even more vile now than they were under gates and ballmer. never forget the real big tech acronym:
View attachment 1736672
And how many people freaking out over this are using a smartphone of some kind?

I remember the screeching when AMD integrated the PSP, when UEFI became a thing, ece. None of it really ever panned out.

Time to invest in RISC-V and FPGAs I guess.

Is this what it feels like to be - may allah forgive me for uttering this word - an Amiga user?
The FOSS community should be investing more into RISC-V anyway, to get away from the X86 duopoly and the locked down ARM setup. The most exciting prospect of apple's M1 chip is that it could move us away from the intel/AMD setup we have now, but RISC-V would be a true boon if we could get a high performance open architecture that anyone could make without any licensing whatsoever.
 
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TFT-A9

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Time to invest in RISC-V and FPGAs I guess.

Is this what it feels like to be - may allah forgive me for uttering this word - an Amiga user?
honestly if you can live with the fact that apparently the Amiga was the computer of choice for furry smut magnate Eric Schwartz it was a pretty baller system
 

Ponchik

fake and gay
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And how many people freaking out over this are using a smartphone of some kind?

I remember the screeching when AMD integrated the PSP, when UEFI became a thing, ece. None of it really ever panned out.


The FOSS community should be investing more into RISC-V anyway, to get away from the X86 duopoly and the locked down ARM setup. The most exciting prospect of apple's M1 chip is that it could move us away from the intel/AMD setup we have now, but RISC-V would be a true boon if we could get a high performance open architecture that anyone could make without any licensing whatsoever.
i've barely used my smartphone in the last two years and it hasn't been on a monthly plan for that entire time essentially. i might buy a burner dumbphone or two just in case

the intel me/amd psp/etc haven't been responsible for anything incredibly egregious yet (to my knowledge), but they have the capabilities to do these things and they're user-hostile by definition. people need to call this shit out when they see it

also pluton is taking pretty much the same approach apple did with their m1 chip ("trusted" security coprocessor directly integrated into the cpu itself) so good luck with that one
honestly if you can live with the fact that apparently the Amiga was the computer of choice for furry smut magnate Eric Schwartz it was a pretty baller system
i have no issue living with that fact because:
  • amigas are being kept alive thanks to the power of sheer autism
  • eric schwartz is actually based
 

Pickle Dick

DO IT FOR HER
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honestly if you can live with the fact that apparently the Amiga was the computer of choice for furry smut magnate Eric Schwartz it was a pretty baller system
  • eric schwartz is actually based
At least Schwartz can actually draw/animate. Already puts him head and shoulders above about 90 percent (if not more) of the other furry artists.

So based that he's been making his own computer animations before Beauty and the Beast was ever released to theaters!
 

AmpleApricots

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The approach with the old computers isn't a terribly bad one. The hardware is easily understood even by the layman if he wants to invest some time in it. With FPGAs you can bring some serious speed to these simple architectures the old silicon couldn't give. As an amateur, it's completely unproblematic to eventually learn all aspects of DOS, CP/M or AmigaOS and even modify it to your needs. While there's freedos and CP/M is open source now, AmigaOS is still proprietary (with a mixture of companies defending the rights quite agressively over the years) but it's so well understood and documented that it's quite possible to hack every aspect of it and that there are no hidden surprises. Compare that to Linux where it's basically impossible for one person to maintain a stable set of patches and keep up with the changes to the kernel and where most software for it is so complex that it's not realistically possible for a person with limited resources to truly know it. Firefox, LibreOffice, desktop environments like GNOME etc. and even system tools like systemd are all open source but they might as well not in regards to their complexity and ease of access regarding that code.

Who truly knows what's ticking in side them besides the developers? Who truly has the resources to fork (fork as in viably maintain a modified version, not as in blindly copying a repository) e.g. GNOME or the kernel if not happy with decisions made by the developers? Also both a big part of userland software in Linux and the kernel is in many aspects driven by corporate interests to a large degree, with userland software it has been becoming noticeable and as soon as Torvalds will retire the Kernel will be a playball between the tech corps maintaining it (it already kinda is). This all puts users at the whim of the authority of a small group of people (sometimes even individuals) who are usually backed by big tech corporations. If their software then runs the world of IT, is the user really, truly free from their whims and choices? I think not. The fact that you can see and technically legally fork the source code doesn't really matter IMHO and these corporations know this. Forking e.g. libreoffice as a normal user is the equivalent of xeroxing your manifest and handing it out at the corner of the street.

True hardware and software freedom can only be reached with minimalism and simplicity in my opinion, really putting the power of the system in the hand of every user.
 

northstar747

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The approach with the old computers isn't a terribly bad one. The hardware is easily understood even by the layman if he wants to invest some time in it. With FPGAs you can bring some serious speed to these simple architectures the old silicon couldn't give. As an amateur, it's completely unproblematic to eventually learn all aspects of DOS, CP/M or AmigaOS and even modify it to your needs. While there's freedos and CP/M is open source now, AmigaOS is still proprietary (with a mixture of companies defending the rights quite agressively over the years) but it's so well understood and documented that it's quite possible to hack every aspect of it and that there are no hidden surprises. Compare that to Linux where it's basically impossible for one person to maintain a stable set of patches and keep up with the changes to the kernel and where most software for it is so complex that it's not realistically possible for a person with limited resources to truly know it. Firefox, LibreOffice, desktop environments like GNOME etc. and even system tools like systemd are all open source but they might as well not in regards to their complexity and ease of access regarding that code.

Who truly knows what's ticking in side them besides the developers? Who truly has the resources to fork (fork as in viably maintain a modified version, not as in blindly copying a repository) e.g. GNOME or the kernel if not happy with decisions made by the developers? Also both a big part of userland software in Linux and the kernel is in many aspects driven by corporate interests to a large degree, with userland software it has been becoming noticeable and as soon as Torvalds will retire the Kernel will be a playball between the tech corps maintaining it (it already kinda is). This all puts users at the whim of the authority of a small group of people (sometimes even individuals) who are usually backed by big tech corporations. If their software then runs the world of IT, is the user really, truly free from their whims and choices? I think not. The fact that you can see and technically legally fork the source code doesn't really matter IMHO and these corporations know this. Forking e.g. libreoffice as a normal user is the equivalent of xeroxing your manifest and handing it out at the corner of the street.

True hardware and software freedom can only be reached with minimalism and simplicity in my opinion, really putting the power of the system in the hand of every user.

So we should just use old commodore 64s?
 

AmpleApricots

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and then only stick to software that's simple enough that you could easily make changes to it yourself.

So we should just use old commodore 64s?

I know it sounds kinda radical and loopy and maybe somewhat Terry-esque but the most open hardware won't really give you freedom if you're shackled to the software and whims of software developers. If you have "open hardware" but don't get rid of all the dependency on bloatware and it's permanent updating and goalpost moving you basically just shift being at the whim of hardware developers to being at the whim of software developers. While it's scarier if both agree to work together to make you their bitch, it's honestly not that much better to just being dependant on one of the groups. It's easy and convenient to just say that you'll just start using Software Y if Software X with a marketshare of > 60% does something questionable but in reality they already have power over you at that point. Yes, I am also aware that at some point you got to have trust in a group of people if you don't want to manufacture the ICs out of sand yourself, but I think it's just reasonable to keep that group as small and carefully picked as possible.
 

3119967d0c

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Who truly knows what's ticking in side them besides the developers? Who truly has the resources to fork (fork as in viably maintain a modified version, not as in blindly copying a repository) e.g. GNOME or the kernel if not happy with decisions made by the developers? Also both a big part of userland software in Linux and the kernel is in many aspects driven by corporate interests to a large degree, with userland software it has been becoming noticeable and as soon as Torvalds will retire the Kernel will be a playball between the tech corps maintaining it (it already kinda is). This all puts users at the whim of the authority of a small group of people (sometimes even individuals) who are usually backed by big tech corporations. If their software then runs the world of IT, is the user really, truly free from their whims and choices? I think not.
Agreed. Even with really dedicated and smart people, one just has to look at examples like the big corporates keeping Reiser4 and now Reiser5 out of the main kernel just because the original developer murdered his wife. Or the enormous amounts of work the devs from projects like Android-X86 have to do everytime a new release comes out, mainly for stuff that could be upstreamed if Google didn't hate free software.
 

Octane

Sata andagi...
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come home, white boy
SGI_Tezro.jpg
 
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Cool Dog

No longer a dog, still cool
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If msft gave a shit about its users' security it would make disk encryption available to all and not just the ones who paid for pro keys

Also the xbox example is bullshit, the xbox team openly admits that modders stopped trying once they let the xbone and every xbox since open to homebrew apps, that way modders didnt bother to crack the console which would also allow them to run pirated games since they can already run all the other stuff they want like emulators

All this chip is gonna do is fuck you up, I bet if your PC dies you wont be able to do any data recovery because your disks are encrypted to a key in the pluto chip that is now dead, just like you cant boot a win10 install in another computer like you did with win7 and older. I used to do that a lot: if one machine died I moved the disk to another to finish my work and then fix the other, but now I cant, thanks msft.
I think people were kind of optimistic that other tech companies wouldn't follow Apple's footsteps in making their own proprietary system chips.

lol
Just look at the phone industry, how many phones outside the low-end range have a headphone jack?
Remember kids, never get rid of your old PCs, you never know when you may need something without a security chip in it that you can still load FSF software on. Reason I hold on to my Phenom II still, one of the fastest chips you can get with no embedded arm security processor, AMD started that bullshit with the FX line.
What was the last intel chip without the IME?
The FOSS community should be investing more into RISC-V anyway, to get away from the X86 duopoly and the locked down ARM setup. The most exciting prospect of apple's M1 chip is that it could move us away from the intel/AMD setup we have now, but RISC-V would be a true boon if we could get a high performance open architecture that anyone could make without any licensing whatsoever.
I had hopes on RISCV until I saw the prices

Sucks to be a third-worlder and not rich
AmigaOS is still proprietary (with a mixture of companies defending the rights quite agressively over the years)
Why? who are they selling it to? where's the profit on keeping a dead OS proprietary?
 

The Real SVP

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because your disks are encrypted to a key in the pluto chip
Which also means you can't just boot into a Linux environment to delete the crap from your Windows install that Windows refuses to delete. Which happens to be how AME gets rid of the worst spyware in Windows 10.
 

Cool Dog

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Which also means you can't just boot into a Linux environment to delete the crap from your Windows install that Windows refuses to delete. Which happens to be how AME gets rid of the worst spyware in Windows 10.
Whats the diff between AME and running a script like sycnex's debloatter?
 

AmpleApricots

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Why? who are they selling it to? where's the profit on keeping a dead OS proprietary?
With the Amiga, part of AmigaOS is in ROM chips that are on the mainboard, not uncommon for systems of that vintage. To fully upgrade the OS of these systems properly, you can replace the ROM chips or, with the right hardware, kind of redirect newer versions of the libraries in RAM. The OS changed ownership several times and saw even continued development, the latest iteration is sort of a less radical (compared to earlier iterations) clean-up and bugfixing project, with the most recent version of the OS I think two-ish years old and worked on by a lone guy from germany. It's kinda zombified but not really dead. There's a market in selling software licenses, (for emulation in hardware and software and for running on real machines) OS-Disks and ROM chips for this old system, even if it's really small and basically only driven by a handful of old die-hard turbo-autists with too much disposable income. There's also still quite a bit of commercial hardware development going on for that platform. As long as a profit is to be made, this will go on.