War Navy commander orders SEALs to shape up - "What is this Mickey Mouse shit?!"

JosephStalin

Vozhd
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I forgot about 18x. Almost all of the SF I’ve been acquainted with were 11bs or some other such thing that worked their way in the pipeline.

I just read anyone who washes out of the program doesn’t get dumped into infantry because it’s over strength. Now it’s needs of the Army. If that isn’t a disincentive I don’t know what is.
No, the infantry isn't overstrength. Army is offering bonuses of up to $40K for a six-year enlistment.



Army Now Offering Recruits up to $40,000 to Join the Infantry

3 Jul 2019
Military.com | By Matthew Cox

FORT KNOX, Kentucky -- U.S. Army recruiters are offering bonuses worth up to $40,000 to new recruits who sign up for the infantry by Sept. 30 as part of an effort to reverse a shortage of grunts for fiscal 2019.

The drastic increase in bonus amounts for recruits in 11X, the infantry military occupational specialty, went into effect in mid-May, according to U.S. Army Recruiting Command officials, who said that the service still needs to fill about 3,300 infantry training seats by Sept. 30.

"We saw this coming in May; we immediately went to the senior leadership and said, 'look, we need to max out the bonuses for 11Xs,'" Maj. Gen. Frank Muth, commander of Army Recruiting Command, told Military.com Tuesday.
"If you sign up to be 11X and you sign a six-year commitment -- $40,000."

Before May, the maximum bonus amount for infantry recruits was $15,000 for a six-year commitment.

Last summer, the Army ran a pilot at Fort Benning, Georgia that resulted in the service extending infantry one station unit training (OSUT) from 14 weeks to 22 weeks. The extended infantry training is designed to give soldiers more time to practice key infantry skills such as land navigation, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat, fire and maneuver and first aid training.

The bonus increase is just a small step in the Army's effort to meet its recruiting goal for the active force of 68,000 soldiers by Sept. 30. The Army launched a multi-faceted recruiting strategy last October after the service missed its 2018 recruiting goal by 6,500 soldiers.

New recruits signing up for the infantry can also get $20,000 for a three-year enlistment, $25,000 for a four-year enlistment and $30,000 for a five-year enlistment, Recruiting Command officials said.

But these new bonuses won't last long, Muth said.

"You've got to ship in August and September," Muth said, explaining that infantry recruits must enter OSUT at Benning by the end of this fiscal year.

"If you ship in October, you don't get the bonus."
 

TerminalTryHard

kiwifarms.net
The Army actually has an MOS called 18X, which represents Infantry/Special Forces Candidate. You can take it when you enlist if you don't eat the crayon during the ASVAB.

Basically all it means is that you go to infantry school, jump school, then immediately on to the Special Operations Preparation Course and Selection. Any 18X that gets dropped along the way gets dumped into the 82nd Airborne as an 11B Infantry.

As I understand it, it's a way to hoodwink dudes into being a grunt that would've otherwise known better and maybe scrape a few Green Beans off the top.
They're actually not even sending them to airborne before selection anymore either because the 82nd and 173rd or overfilled with SF and ranger drop outs. So now they only go to airborne if they get selected.

Just to add some context the 18x guys only have a 3% pass rate at selection and thats with the prep class they added between OSUT and selection, now remember after selection they still have to attend the Q-course which only has a 50% pass rate.
 
N

NN 401

Guest
kiwifarms.net
No, the infantry isn't overstrength. Army is offering bonuses of up to $40K for a six-year enlistment.



Army Now Offering Recruits up to $40,000 to Join the Infantry

3 Jul 2019
Military.com | By Matthew Cox

FORT KNOX, Kentucky -- U.S. Army recruiters are offering bonuses worth up to $40,000 to new recruits who sign up for the infantry by Sept. 30 as part of an effort to reverse a shortage of grunts for fiscal 2019.

The drastic increase in bonus amounts for recruits in 11X, the infantry military occupational specialty, went into effect in mid-May, according to U.S. Army Recruiting Command officials, who said that the service still needs to fill about 3,300 infantry training seats by Sept. 30.

"We saw this coming in May; we immediately went to the senior leadership and said, 'look, we need to max out the bonuses for 11Xs,'" Maj. Gen. Frank Muth, commander of Army Recruiting Command, told Military.com Tuesday.
"If you sign up to be 11X and you sign a six-year commitment -- $40,000."

Before May, the maximum bonus amount for infantry recruits was $15,000 for a six-year commitment.

Last summer, the Army ran a pilot at Fort Benning, Georgia that resulted in the service extending infantry one station unit training (OSUT) from 14 weeks to 22 weeks. The extended infantry training is designed to give soldiers more time to practice key infantry skills such as land navigation, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat, fire and maneuver and first aid training.

The bonus increase is just a small step in the Army's effort to meet its recruiting goal for the active force of 68,000 soldiers by Sept. 30. The Army launched a multi-faceted recruiting strategy last October after the service missed its 2018 recruiting goal by 6,500 soldiers.

New recruits signing up for the infantry can also get $20,000 for a three-year enlistment, $25,000 for a four-year enlistment and $30,000 for a five-year enlistment, Recruiting Command officials said.

But these new bonuses won't last long, Muth said.

"You've got to ship in August and September," Muth said, explaining that infantry recruits must enter OSUT at Benning by the end of this fiscal year.

"If you ship in October, you don't get the bonus."
They go back and forth being over strength, under strength, whatever strength I probably read some news from last year and thought it was current.
This is the same outfit which fired so many aviators during the 2014 purge that the unit is now perpetually on fire with massive burn out going on in the officer corps.

I see your 40k, by the way, and raise you 250k.

Time to bust out the photoshop and get to doctoring that birth certificate.
 

mindlessobserver

kiwifarms.net
Honestly from the sound of things the issue with the SEALs is probably too ingrained and the service needs to be disbanded entirely and rebuilt. The reason why it happened is patently obvious to anyone who has spent any time at all in the military. The SEALs were cut off from their own service and put in a "special place" without independent oversight or any interaction at all with the rest of their greater organization.

As an example, Army Green Berets are garrisoned on the same bases as regular units. When morning PT rolls around, they go out and do it along with every other unit on the base. When Army Units are deployed, the Green Beret detachments often go along with them. If for some reason they were to start acting the fools on base, they would be just at risk of getting chewed out by a passing (non green beret) NCO/Officer as one of their own. Which they never did because such humiliation could never be suffered. Incedentally from what I understand the Air Force versions of Special Ops (the SAR guys) are the same.

Navy SEALs on the other hand, while garrisoned at the bases without exception almost never deploy with the fleets. So while the Navy is off at Sea doing Navy shit, along with their best officers and NCOs, the SEALs are doing their own thing. Which means along with having no oversight or connection with the larger organization, they are also free to form their own little close knit clique. They could overcome this by being more closely attached to the Marines, and going to sea with Marine Detachments now and again, but they don't. It was inevitable they would develop their own little corrupt mafia.

Only fix I can see is to disband the organization in its entirety and then reincorporate it within the Marine Corps, where the SEALs are not their own unit of special princesses. They are Marines. Well trained Marines. But just Marines.
 
N

NN 401

Guest
kiwifarms.net
Honestly from the sound of things the issue with the SEALs is probably too ingrained and the service needs to be disbanded entirely and rebuilt. The reason why it happened is patently obvious to anyone who has spent any time at all in the military. The SEALs were cut off from their own service and put in a "special place" without independent oversight or any interaction at all with the rest of their greater organization.

As an example, Army Green Berets are garrisoned on the same bases as regular units. When morning PT rolls around, they go out and do it along with every other unit on the base. When Army Units are deployed, the Green Beret detachments often go along with them. If for some reason they were to start acting the fools on base, they would be just at risk of getting chewed out by a passing (non green beret) NCO/Officer as one of their own. Which they never did because such humiliation could never be suffered. Incedentally from what I understand the Air Force versions of Special Ops (the SAR guys) are the same.

Navy SEALs on the other hand, while garrisoned at the bases without exception almost never deploy with the fleets. So while the Navy is off at Sea doing Navy shit, along with their best officers and NCOs, the SEALs are doing their own thing. Which means along with having no oversight or connection with the larger organization, they are also free to form their own little close knit clique. They could overcome this by being more closely attached to the Marines, and going to sea with Marine Detachments now and again, but they don't. It was inevitable they would develop their own little corrupt mafia.

Only fix I can see is to disband the organization in its entirety and then reincorporate it within the Marine Corps, where the SEALs are not their own unit of special princesses. They are Marines. Well trained Marines. But just Marines.

Fuckin’ A.

At the same time I’m actually worried that Dam Neck(sp?) would murder everyone involved if they tried that. I’m only half joking by the way.
I mean look at this shit.

Honestly, I’m concerned about the reverberations this and all the other egregious crap that’s been pulled causing a serious disturbance in the Force. As in retaliation or even plain old stonewalling between units that are supposed to be cooperating.
We already have people who take the “friendly rivalry” between the branches stuff too seriously.

@SmallTalk201

Absolutely not.
One we already have JSOC and SOCOM ( I think they’re the same thing?) that acts kind of like that.
And two, it would make these groups far more insular and mafia like. We’ve already seen what special treatment turned the Seals into.

Also, these “elite units” are not the end and be all. The whole point of Spec Ops is to gather intel, and get behind enemy lines in order to soften them up for the Navy and the Army.

They do not win wars by themselves, or rather can’t, and they don’t need any more sunshine blown up their asses about what their role is in the grand scheme of military tactics and strategy.
 
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mindlessobserver

kiwifarms.net
Fuckin’ A.

At the same time I’m actually worried that Dam Neck(sp?) would murder everyone involved if they tried that. I’m only half joking by the way.
I mean look at this shit.

Honestly, I’m concerned about the reverberations this and all the other egregious crap that’s been pulled causing a serious disturbance in the Force. As in retaliation or even plain old stonewalling between units that are supposed to be cooperating.
We already have people who take the “friendly rivalry” between the branches stuff too seriously.
That shit that went down in Mali where a group of SEALs murdered a Green Beret has most definitely caused a "disturbance in the force". Its not even a question at this point, they plead guilty so they could escape a firing squad. They claim it was "hazing gone wrong" but absolutely nobody believes it. Certainly nobody in or from the Army. The punishment of 1 year in prison was also a double slap. Since they were Navy, the Navy got to run the court martial and the Admiral in charge let them dodge the capital charges in exchange for pleading guilty to a "hazing gone wrong". The Navy will also probably have to give those SEALs plastic surgery and a sex change for free after they get released next year because there are a whole bunch of active Army and Veterans who will quite happily throw them a car pool down at the levee.
 
N

NN 401

Guest
kiwifarms.net
That shit that went down in Mali where a group of SEALs murdered a Green Beret has most definitely caused a "disturbance in the force". Its not even a question at this point, they plead guilty so they could escape a firing squad. They claim it was "hazing gone wrong" but absolutely nobody believes it. Certainly nobody in or from the Army. The punishment of 1 year in prison was also a double slap. Since they were Navy, the Navy got to run the court martial and the Admiral in charge let them dodge the capital charges in exchange for pleading guilty to a "hazing gone wrong". The Navy will also probably have to give those SEALs plastic surgery and a sex change for free after they get released next year because there are a whole bunch of active Army and Veterans who will quite happily throw them a car pool down at the levee.
Everyone knows it was over drug money. The thing that gets me is that the Green Beret involved seemed like one of those guys who did all the right things in life.
And this is how it ended for him.

And according to this chuckle fuck below the Seals were being treated unfairly and were the real good guys all along.
https://beta.washingtonpost.com/national-security/2019/06/19/navy-seal-convicted-death-green-beret-soldier-investigated-contact-with-victims-widow-party/?outputType=amp&utm_source=reddit.com

I sat there for a whole minute, gobsmacked, when I read that he approached Melgar’s widow dressed as Rambo.
 
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JosephStalin

Vozhd
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Here's my take on the SEAL issue. A little powerlevel...am a retired senior officer, not Navy, but have commanded people.

This entire thing is a failure of leadership, from the leading petty officer level all the way up to the flag officer in command of the SEALS.

These men knew right from wrong. These men knew Navy standards for grooming, dress, and behavior. Those men in leadership positions knew it was their job to enforce Navy standards. The platoon commanders knew they had to know and enforce the rules of engagement (ROE), enforce Navy standards (grooming/dress standards can be modified per operational requirements), and ensure the chief, leading petty officers, and petty officers also knew and enforced those rules. You go up the chain of command. These men, at all levels, are required to not just know Navy standards but get out to the units and see what's going on. There is no substitute for command presence. You need to be around and set the example.

Going to zero in on the platoon commanders and their chief petty officers/leading petty officers. From what little I know, platoon commanders are lieutenants (O-3). Means they'e been in the Navy at least four years, and if SEALS likely have at least one deployment under their belts. They are supposed to know their shit and operate with minimal direction. The vast majority serve creditably. But there are a few who don't. They know better. Out they go, and maybe the executive officer, if the platoon has one. The officer is in command. "When you're in command, command." But it's the chiefs and leading petty officers who run things. They are the first-line supervisors responsible for enforcing standards. If they don't do their job it is much more difficult for the commander to do his job. So out go the bad chiefs and leading petty officers. In the platoon recalled to the USA, looks like the rot ran all the way through. I see firings and Uniform Code of Military Justice action, if not already done.

Okay, Joe. What else would you do? I'd probably fire some SEAL company/detachment/whatever commanders. These guys are likely commanders (O-5) and maybe a captain (O-6) thrown in. The West Coast commander, East Coast commander, and I would review what's been going on with each platoon as far as disciplinary issues. Got a company with several problem platoons? Company commander goes, problem platoon commanders go, maybe more. The vast majority of SEALS serve professionally and honorably. But there's always that 10% who cause 90% of the problems. You deal with the 10%, swiftly. Shows everyone else you aren't fucking around. I'd also mandate all my subordinate commanders to carry out periodic unannounced visits to their operational sections/platoons/etc. It is never enough to just tell people they need to meet Navy standards. You have to go out there and ensure the standards are enforced. You'll know where you need to go most often and where you only need to go now and then. If you don't you need to be fired. No excuse for not knowing where your command presence is most needed. And don't bitch about paperwork, either. That's why you have an executive officer. They should be giving you only the things you absolutely need to see, sign, etc.

Can't say enough about being visible. When I was in charge or in command, I'd walk through the facility/operations area first thing in the morning or at the start of the shift. Would look for any obvious problems, look to see that people are where they are supposed to be, greet people. Was also very visible for fire/bomb drills. Was part of the team doing simulated bomb searches, for example. Also stayed in close touch with my senior NCOs, always ready to listen and act if needed. Not rocket science. That's why they put the stuff on your shoulders and pay you the big bucks. Somewhere along the line, looks like a number of SEAL commanders, at all levels, forgot why they were there.
 

Wesley Willis

Rock over London, Burn down Chicago!
kiwifarms.net
At least this one didn't lie about punching Jesse Ventura in the face. How much of a goon do you have to be to lie about hitting a 60-year-old man?
 

Ihavetinyweewee

But massive grotesque balls
kiwifarms.net
Honestly from the sound of things the issue with the SEALs is probably too ingrained and the service needs to be disbanded entirely and rebuilt. The reason why it happened is patently obvious to anyone who has spent any time at all in the military. The SEALs were cut off from their own service and put in a "special place" without independent oversight or any interaction at all with the rest of their greater organization.

As an example, Army Green Berets are garrisoned on the same bases as regular units. When morning PT rolls around, they go out and do it along with every other unit on the base. When Army Units are deployed, the Green Beret detachments often go along with them. If for some reason they were to start acting the fools on base, they would be just at risk of getting chewed out by a passing (non green beret) NCO/Officer as one of their own. Which they never did because such humiliation could never be suffered. Incedentally from what I understand the Air Force versions of Special Ops (the SAR guys) are the same.

Navy SEALs on the other hand, while garrisoned at the bases without exception almost never deploy with the fleets. So while the Navy is off at Sea doing Navy shit, along with their best officers and NCOs, the SEALs are doing their own thing. Which means along with having no oversight or connection with the larger organization, they are also free to form their own little close knit clique. They could overcome this by being more closely attached to the Marines, and going to sea with Marine Detachments now and again, but they don't. It was inevitable they would develop their own little corrupt mafia.

Only fix I can see is to disband the organization in its entirety and then reincorporate it within the Marine Corps, where the SEALs are not their own unit of special princesses. They are Marines. Well trained Marines. But just Marines.
Eh, this is not entirely accurate. Even though, Green Berets are definitely more intergrated in the Big Army vs SEALs/Navy.

Special Forces are absolutely segregated from regular army units. Its very apparent if you go to Ft. Bragg.

Also, shit like team PT is largely at discretion of the team sergeant: I've never heard of an A-team getting up for reveille with the 82nd airborne for morning PT. Usually its 'big boy' rules and you do that on your own time. Special Forces, culturally, is not exactly regimented.

The Team NCO is, typically, far more concerened about setting up proper training blocks for either work up or cross training. Either that or half the team is gone anyways because of training courses.

As far as a passing NCO/officer(I'm assuming from another unit?) chewing out a Special forces soldier. Unless he is in his chain of command, that guy can't do shit. Oh he can complain(through Green Berets command chain), if he wants, but most likely they would be politely told to 'get fucked'...

Also, you kinda have it in reverse: Army units are sometimes attached in support of Green Berets. Not vice versa, typically. Sometimes, Green Berets can be put under the jurisdiction(on loan)to a task force/thearter commander in support of a larger operation.

However, given the Special Forces mission set: they usually operate with autonomy largely dictated through Special Operations Command.

Thats kinda the rub with all of this: Neither the Green Berets or SEALs answer to their parent branches. They answer to SOCOM. SOCOM owns these units, not the Army/Navy..
 
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Ihavetinyweewee

But massive grotesque balls
kiwifarms.net
Here's my take on the SEAL issue. A little powerlevel...am a retired senior officer, not Navy, but have commanded people.

This entire thing is a failure of leadership, from the leading petty officer level all the way up to the flag officer in command of the SEALS.

These men knew right from wrong. These men knew Navy standards for grooming, dress, and behavior. Those men in leadership positions knew it was their job to enforce Navy standards. The platoon commanders knew they had to know and enforce the rules of engagement (ROE), enforce Navy standards (grooming/dress standards can be modified per operational requirements), and ensure the chief, leading petty officers, and petty officers also knew and enforced those rules. You go up the chain of command. These men, at all levels, are required to not just know Navy standards but get out to the units and see what's going on. There is no substitute for command presence. You need to be around and set the example.

Going to zero in on the platoon commanders and their chief petty officers/leading petty officers. From what little I know, platoon commanders are lieutenants (O-3). Means they'e been in the Navy at least four years, and if SEALS likely have at least one deployment under their belts. They are supposed to know their shit and operate with minimal direction. The vast majority serve creditably. But there are a few who don't. They know better. Out they go, and maybe the executive officer, if the platoon has one. The officer is in command. "When you're in command, command." But it's the chiefs and leading petty officers who run things. They are the first-line supervisors responsible for enforcing standards. If they don't do their job it is much more difficult for the commander to do his job. So out go the bad chiefs and leading petty officers. In the platoon recalled to the USA, looks like the rot ran all the way through. I see firings and Uniform Code of Military Justice action, if not already done.

Okay, Joe. What else would you do? I'd probably fire some SEAL company/detachment/whatever commanders. These guys are likely commanders (O-5) and maybe a captain (O-6) thrown in. The West Coast commander, East Coast commander, and I would review what's been going on with each platoon as far as disciplinary issues. Got a company with several problem platoons? Company commander goes, problem platoon commanders go, maybe more. The vast majority of SEALS serve professionally and honorably. But there's always that 10% who cause 90% of the problems. You deal with the 10%, swiftly. Shows everyone else you aren't fucking around. I'd also mandate all my subordinate commanders to carry out periodic unannounced visits to their operational sections/platoons/etc. It is never enough to just tell people they need to meet Navy standards. You have to go out there and ensure the standards are enforced. You'll know where you need to go most often and where you only need to go now and then. If you don't you need to be fired. No excuse for not knowing where your command presence is most needed. And don't bitch about paperwork, either. That's why you have an executive officer. They should be giving you only the things you absolutely need to see, sign, etc.

Can't say enough about being visible. When I was in charge or in command, I'd walk through the facility/operations area first thing in the morning or at the start of the shift. Would look for any obvious problems, look to see that people are where they are supposed to be, greet people. Was also very visible for fire/bomb drills. Was part of the team doing simulated bomb searches, for example. Also stayed in close touch with my senior NCOs, always ready to listen and act if needed. Not rocket science. That's why they put the stuff on your shoulders and pay you the big bucks. Somewhere along the line, looks like a number of SEAL commanders, at all levels, forgot why they were there.
To clarify the SEAL command structure(lowest to highest):

SEALs don't use company compositions. The lowest level command is a platoon with a junior command officer(02) and an OIC(03). Platoons are 16-18 men.

SEALs next composition is a troop which are two platoons with an HQ element commanded by an 04

SEALs deploy as a squadron which is a troop with its support assests.

SEAL teams are three troops with its Staff HQ commanded by an 05. A SEAL team is the closest thing to a company element.

Teams make up two regional Groups of East/West each commanded by an 06.

Naval Special Warfare Command is overseen by an 07
 
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JosephStalin

Vozhd
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
To clarify the SEAL command structure(lowest to highest):

SEALs don't use company compositions. The lowest level command is a platoon with a junior command officer(02) and an OIC(03). Platoons are 16-18 men.

SEALs next composition is a troop which are two platoons with an HQ element commanded by an 04

SEALs deploy as a squadron which is a troop with its support assests.

SEAL teams are three troops with its Staff HQ commanded by an 05. A SEAL team is the closest thing to a company element.

Teams make up two regional Groups of East/West each commanded by an 06.

Naval Special Warfare Command is overseen by an 07

Thanks. Not Navy so wasn't sure.
 

oldTireWater

Incompetent as fuck
kiwifarms.net
HAH! Fuck your beards! Fucking cool-guy faggots.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2019/08/23/for-seals-its-back-to-regulation-haircuts-and-uniform-inspections/

For SEALs, it’s back to regulation haircuts and uniform inspections

By: Carl Prine   3 days ago



Naval Special Warfare commander Rear Adm. Collin P. Green delivered remarks during a July 30 change of office ceremony in Washington, D.C. (Laura Lakeway/Navy)



Stung by a string of scandals starring SEALs behaving badly, Naval Special Warfare commander Rear Adm. Collin Green on Tuesday issued a four-page “back to basics” directive designed to shore up shoddy conduct, restore moral accountability and create better leaders.

Released to senior leaders and then obtained by Navy Times, Green’s guidance returns the SEAL and boat teams to standards expected of service members across the fleet, with a mandate for leaders to conduct “routine inspections of your units and strictly enforce all Navy grooming and uniform standards, including adherence to all Navy traditions, customs and ceremonies.”

Within popular culture, SEALs often are depicted as bearded commandos with a shaggy pirate bravado but Green’s memo echoes former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson’s May advice to the sea service’s leaders, telling them that they will be judged by the character and performance of their teams.

Green’s guidance clearly puts character first and adopts steps that will anchor SEALs not only to their own storied history but to the larger institution of the Navy.

Commanders will inspect their officers and sailors during uniform shifts, establish “weekly battle rhythm events” to include quarters, unit physical training and zone inspections, with Green personally holding leaders “accountable for all substandard issues related to your personnel on and off duty.”

“We are U.S. Naval Officers and Sailors first and foremost and we will realign ourselves to these standards immediately,” the WARCOM boss wrote.

That was merely one reform in a series of ordered changes Green identified in his “Call to Action” memo, an extraordinary document that Green conceded was triggered by a force that “has drifted from our Navy core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment” and an ethos “due to a lack of action at all levels of Leadership.”

Without quantifying their numbers, Green told his subordinates that “a portion of this Force is ethically misaligned” with traditional SEAL culture because of those “who fail to correct this behavior” and instead “prioritize this misalignment over the loyalty to Navy and Nation.”

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“This drift ends now,” Green said.


Members of Alpha Platoon, SEAL Team 7, pose in front of the body of a dead Islamic State prisoner of war in Iraq in 2017. Only Special Warfare Operator Chief Edward “Eddie” Gallagher was prosecuted for appearing in the image. (Navy)

Members of Alpha Platoon, SEAL Team 7, pose in front of the body of a dead Islamic State prisoner of war in Iraq in 2017. Only Special Warfare Operator Chief Edward “Eddie” Gallagher was prosecuted for appearing in the image. (Navy)

Green recently completed a review that explored potential ethical, health and cultural problems dogging a special operations force that’s consistently rotated overseas since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. However, leaders at U.S. Special Operations Command two weeks ago demanded he submit a second version following more glum headlines about his SEALs.

Following a boozy July 4th party in Iraq, SOCOM superiors booted Foxtrot Platoon, SEAL Team 7, back to Naval Base Coronado, with ongoing investigations for sexual assault, fraternization and other allegations of misconduct trailing in their wake.

Prosecutors also say a pair of Navy SEALs are linked to the June 4, 2017, death of Army Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar at his residence in Bamako, Mali.

Throughout August, admirals have dismissed five prosecutions involving SEALs linked to either war crimes or their cover up in Iraq and Afghanistan, including the botched court-martial of Special Warfare Operator Chief Edward “Eddie” Gallagher.

A military panel of his peers cleared the SEAL of murdering an Islamic State prisoner of war, obstruction of justice and other serious specifications, finding him guilty only of the minor charge of posing with the dead detainee’s body.

Although other SEALs posed with him, they weren’t charged and the investigation and trial of Gallagher were dogged with allegations of misconduct by Naval Special Warfare leaders, prosecutors and Naval Criminal Investigative Service agents.

And before they were caught last year, several SEAL Team 10 special warfare operators snorted cocaine or spiked their drinks with the banned substance, often defeating military drug tests they termed “a joke,” according to an internal investigation obtained by Navy Times.

There’s also the ongoing prosecution of Special Operator 1st Class Aaron Howard for allegedly using chat messages to catfish three women, who sent him racy photos.

The military judge in his case has determined that it appears SEAL Team 6 leaders wielded unlawful command influence to deny him a fair hearing but prosecutors are expected to file a rebuttal to the ruling.

Internal report exposes cocaine abuse, lax testing, inside SEAL Team 10

Internal report exposes cocaine abuse, lax testing, inside SEAL Team 10
In the wake of the probe, SEAL Team 10′s superiors at Naval Special Warfare Group 2 updated the urinalysis program, retrained those who administer the tests and hiked the frequency of the screenings, according to the Navy.

By: Geoff Ziezulewicz

Those scandals form the backdrop to Green’s efforts, which are both broad in their goals and, at times, detailed in their execution.

For example, Green’s memo reveals that he’s moved to quash the proliferation of all “unofficial unit insignia” below the troop level. From now on, the only logos, patches and slogans authorized are those “that have been formally processed and approved” in accordance with Navy regs at the team level.

Green ordered unit leaders to submit to him personally a “First Flag” format for all reports about chief petty officers and above accused of misconduct. That form typically is used to highlight sexual assault cases, so it telegraphs the seriousness he sees potential wrongdoing by non-commissioned and commissioned leaders.

“I reserve the right to withhold all Non-Judicial Punishment authority for those reports at my level as I deem appropriate,” he warned.

By Sept. 20, Green will be able to monitor all disciplinary cases in all ranks with a special tracker, updated quarterly by the teams.

Sexting, salacious snapshots: Inside SEAL Team 6′s spoofing scandal

Sexting, salacious snapshots: Inside SEAL Team 6′s spoofing scandal
It's the latest imbroglio to embarrass the SEALs, the elite special operators once lauded as “silent professionals” who eschewed the shenanigans that snagged headlines.

By: Mark Faram, Geoff Ziezulewicz

SEAL platoons now will grow “only after we have groomed a sufficient inventory of leadership teams that have been adequately trained, certified and possess the highest standards of character and competence to fill the additional leadership positions in the tactical formations,” wrote Green, adding that his units now “will only grow at the pace of excellence," with an emphasis of “quality over quantity.”

Part of a larger force optimization blueprint that proposes to increase the number of platoons in a squadron, Green’s guidance would halt the expansion for some troops until leaders can prove they’ve put the right people in place and they’ve been properly trained for the mission.

Partly, that will be accomplished by the creation of a “Leadership Development Program” designed to sculpt “ethical development” throughout a career, with peer evaluations built into the initiative, plus a formal “Navy Legal Education” system beginning at the platoon leadership level, according to the memo.

It builds on the mentoring approach SEAL candidates see during their rigorous Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training and Green sees it as professionally and morally scaffolding careers, so that sailors and their officers are consistently groomed and graded to grow within a community of special operators, not merely to hurdle professional milestones.

All leading petty officer and chief selections now will be guided by formal advancement boards, similar to officer milestone promotion boards, Green indicated.

He also demanded that only “top performers” be placed in instructor and leadership roles in training billets that teach ethical conduct.

“You will only allow your best to train and mentor our Force,” he said.

That will be tracked after commanders create “grading criteria for performance of key leaders and units” during the standard 18-month training cycle.

CNO nominee vows probe into Navy SEAL scandals

CNO nominee vows probe into Navy SEAL scandals
Vice Adm. Michael Gilday said officials are looking whether cultural problems are at play in the recent bad reports.

By: Leo Shane III

Although Green publicly has expressed growing concerns about a SEAL force hit by a high tempo of counter-terrorism operations overseas and other pressures placed on a small and elite combat force, his directive only tangentially tackles those issues.

Within two months of a change of command ceremony, however, new leaders must conduct an offsite session with their subordinates to explore the “culture, ethics, accountability and good order and discipline” of the units, Green wrote.

Captains leading Green’s teams also will begin “intrusive leadership and oversight on ALL Command Navy Programs," according to his memo.

Special scrutiny will fall on personnel assigned as program managers for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor, Command Urinalysis, Command Managed Equal Opportunity, Suicide Prevention and the Equipment Accountability and Managers’ Internal Control Program.

A biweekly “Tone of the Force” commander’s assessment also will go to Green, backed up with data culled from the programs.

Leaders are expected to reach out to Green’s command staff to schedule “assist visits for areas of weakness,” Green added.

“We are a family that values ownership and accountability of our actions,” he wrote. “We value the aggressive introspective study of our mistakes required to turn our weaknesses to strengths. We will be strong in character, strong in accountability, strong in moral and ethical foundations, and strong in leadership.”
This is funny, but will accomplish little. Unit culture isn't changed from above.

They need to disband these assholes for a couple months every year, and embed them individually into the fleets as lower enlisted non-rates (or whatever the Navy calls them). Make them spend time away from each other, and with normal faggots doing normal gay shit.

Edit: I didn't care for the filtering of R E T A R D, so I replaced it with "faggot" and "gay".
 

mindlessobserver

kiwifarms.net
Eh, this is not entirely accurate. Even though, Green Berets are definitely more intergrated in the Big Army vs SEALs/Navy.

Special Forces are absolutely segregated from regular army units. Its very apparent if you go to Ft. Bragg.

Also, shit like team PT is largely at discretion of the team sergeant: I've never heard of an A-team getting up for reveille with the 82nd airborne for morning PT. Usually its 'big boy' rules and you do that on your own time. Special Forces, culturally, is not exactly regimented.

The Team NCO is, typically, far more concerened about setting up proper training blocks for either work up or cross training. Either that or half the team is gone anyways because of training courses.

As far as a passing NCO/officer(I'm assuming from another unit?) chewing out a Special forces soldier. Unless he is in his chain of command, that guy can't do shit. Oh he can complain(through Green Berets command chain), if he wants, but most likely they would be politely told to 'get fucked'...

Also, you kinda have it in reverse: Army units are sometimes attached in support of Green Berets. Not vice versa, typically. Sometimes, Green Berets can be put under the jurisdiction(on loan)to a task force/thearter commander in support of a larger operation.

However, given the Special Forces mission set: they usually operate with autonomy largely dictated through Special Operations Command.

Thats kinda the rub with all of this: Neither the Green Berets or SEALs answer to their parent branches. They answer to SOCOM. SOCOM owns these units, not the Army/Navy..
I can only speak for Fort Campbell, but the spec ops guys there were usually out and about. Might have been something there own commander required as opposed to a standard procedure in general. Other then that though I do agree. They are not "attached" as in, within the chain of command. But its very rare for them to be so detached as they are not around the larger organization, which was more what I was getting at.
 

Ihavetinyweewee

But massive grotesque balls
kiwifarms.net
I can only speak for Fort Campbell, but the spec ops guys there were usually out and about. Might have been something there own commander required as opposed to a standard procedure in general. Other then that though I do agree. They are not "attached" as in, within the chain of command. But its very rare for them to be so detached as they are not around the larger organization, which was more what I was getting at.
I mean its fairly common for Green Berets to work within the battlespace of an Army commander. They usually have a supply chain with a larger brigade and are augmenated with enablers from big Army.

But, their usually working independently in a remote section, trying to pacify a perticuliar 'trouble zone'. At least in a FID/COIN role. In a UW role, GB are capable to be completely self sufficent with minimal support, relying on the indiginious populace.
 
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