Diseased Neo-Pagans / Witches on the Internet / Witchblr - SMT IRL, but with fatties

  • Stinky Indonesians are trying to spam the forum with ad placement links. If you see a post containing inline links or direct link placements to what seem like commercial products, only somewhat related to the thread, please report it. Fake passports/documents and brand name clothing like shoes seem common.

fuzzyrodent85

kiwifarms.net
Interestingly, most sterotypical magic instruments are intended to invoke "male power." Staffs, wands, and broomsticks are phallic by design and inherently sexual.

I feel like a lot of the Witchblr crowd sees witchdom as a feminine religion/lifestyle/whatever because the portrayal of witches is dominated by females in every piece of media ever, when in reality, witch has always been a gender-neutral term. Witches are not female wizards, for example. There can be male witches too.

In saying that, a lot of them seem to ignore the blatantly masculine aspects of witchcraft and how both genders are utilized for sake of rituals. Witchcraft is not feminist. It is not rebelling against the patriarchy. Literally, the only thing it rebels against is God which, I understand is half the point with these sad sacks.

I acknowledge that I know way too much about this subject. I promise I'm not a pagan LARPer, I just find the topics really fascinating as relating to history, Biblical context, etc. There's the old adage of "know your enemy" and it helps to know about this stuff before you argue against it. Churches are losing their young people to psuedo-witchcraft 'cause they don't know jack about it.

The foundation for internet-grade witchcraft is built almost entirely on Hollywood's interpretations, rather than what is historically and religiously accurate... and these these people wonder why they're not taken seriously outside of the internet bubble.
Interesting. Is there historical magick for period blood or is that a thing that tumblr made up? What is the closest counterpart to emoji spells? Were crystals really used as dildos for magickal purposes or was it just because they didn't invent silicone yet?
 

LinkinParkxNaruto[AMV]

I try so hard and got so far
kiwifarms.net
Interesting. Is there historical magick for period blood or is that a thing that tumblr made up? What is the closest counterpart to emoji spells? Were crystals really used as dildos for magickal purposes or was it just because they didn't invent silicone yet?
I would say the answer for all of these is yes but mostly talking about Aleister Crowley, the dude that turned taking it up the ass into a mystical act and wrote poems about semen and shit eating.

Ironically the occultist and high magic tradition is full of judeochristian lore and morality. Someone like Eliphas Levi for example was a priest and told freemasons to fuck off precisely because they were at odds with the christian church, i think magic and occultism before the 20th century had way more of a conservative flair than anything else. But then again, people into "high" magic absolutely hated witches, high magic people didn't like folk religion types, animists and spiritualists, they often like to see themselves as more "high minded" and less " supersticious", emphasis on the air quotes.

What is the closest counterpart to emoji spells?
Sigil magick , chaos magick is all about making sigils, have people look at your sigils, cumming on top of sigils, eating the cum stained sigils, etc
 

EyelessMC

kiwifarms.net
In the real world witches are not good people, but neither are trads and puritans.
lol Mate, do you know what witch hunters used to do? Look up what a "witch cake" is. Modern day witch hunters? Nah, there's nothing "Puritan" or "Trad" about "corrective rape", mutilation or shoving people into tires and setting them on fire. More often than not the hunter v witch struggle of today is just it's blood hungry gangsters going after crazy blood hungry gangsters. Good points otherwise.
The actual IRL Puritans of the 17th Century
Look, the Puritans on a whole did have some silly ideas. For instance, the idea that love grows in marriage rather than marriage following love--as in, you marry first, then learn to love the person you've yoked yourself to by vows until actual death. What a disaster...
Still, despite the silliness and the variation between them (some were just nuts) I'm gonna call your remark here [citation needed]. Puritans were serious folk but they weren't just hanging anything/anyone sneezing wrong. Last I checked Johnathan Edwards was a Puritan and that guy was about as inclined to roving lynchings as a Care Bear, and he was a hugely recognized pastor too.

Everything is Apollo this, Aphrodite that. Where is the love for my boy Priapus?
And people wonder why Rome is known for being unbelievably obsessed with the coom
If a pagan revival is what we are after we need to start wearing dick shaped charms
Penis Japan.png
And people wonder why Japan is known for being unbelievably obsessed with the coom. Still somehow less horrible and degenerate than any given Gay Pride Parade, which...is not a pleasant realization.
 

LinkinParkxNaruto[AMV]

I try so hard and got so far
kiwifarms.net
lol Mate, do you know what witch hunters used to do? Look up what a "witch cake" is. Modern day witch hunters? Nah, there's nothing "Puritan" or "Trad" about "corrective rape", mutilation or shoving people into tires and setting them on fire. More often than not the hunter v witch struggle of today is just it's blood hungry gangsters going after crazy blood hungry gangsters. Good points otherwise.

Look, the Puritans on a whole did have some silly ideas. For instance, the idea that love grows in marriage rather than marriage following love--as in, you marry first, then learn to love the person you've yoked yourself to by vows until actual death. What a disaster...
Still, despite the silliness and the variation between them (some were just nuts) I'm gonna call your remark here [citation needed]. Puritans were serious folk but they weren't just hanging anything/anyone sneezing wrong. Last I checked Johnathan Edwards was a Puritan and that guy was about as inclined to roving lynchings as a Care Bear, and he was a hugely recognized pastor too.


And people wonder why Rome is known for being unbelievably obsessed with the coom

And people wonder why Japan is known for being unbelievably obsessed with the coom. Still somehow less horrible and degenerate than any given Gay Pride Parade, which...is not a pleasant realization.
Reject modernity, embrace tradition

penis-necklace.jpg
 

eDove

Coo coo
kiwifarms.net
Interesting. Is there historical magick for period blood or is that a thing that tumblr made up? What is the closest counterpart to emoji spells? Were crystals really used as dildos for magickal purposes or was it just because they didn't invent silicone yet?
Menstrual blood is regarded as impure and taboo in pretty much every culture in the world. If you go back far enough, however, you find some cultures that viewed it as sacred or powerful, but powerful doesn't automatically translate into magical. There were certainly witches who incorporated it into their spells, though. The most dependable example would have to be from "hoodoo" which involves ALL forms of bodily excretions being used in rituals, such as semen, sweat, shit, saliva, piss, so on. Messed up African magic, basically. As for the Witchblrs, there was an influx of menstruation being used for spells in the 2010s (at the height of Tumblr's popularity, imagine that). I think it's predominantly modern-day bullshit. Glamorizing menstrual blood is easier for these girls to do amongst themselves than to glamorize human shit.
There is a body of water with three interlocking pools, or something like that, and its water turns red at different times of the year. I cannot remember what it was called for the life of me, but it's the first thing I thought of. That place has significance with actual witchcrafters 'cause of the obvious symbology at play.

I never heard of emoji spells, haha, but that's so stupid it's funny. I won't say there isn't some sort of validity to it on a spiritual scale. Technology can absolutely be a medium for divination and rituals. Witches have been scrawling their garbage on parchment for thousands of years to actualize it, so why would stringing emojis together be any less potent? The problem still lies with the individual and their intent, and why they'd wanna do such a thing. The closest counterpart to emoji spells would have to be written spells.

And I've never heard of the crystal dildos either. When I try looking into it, I get an assload of Cosmopolitan-esque websites describing how "energizing" crystal dildos are. I guess it sounds more genuine in the Witchblrs' minds if they can claim there is historical significance. It doesn't have to be historically significant to "work," but whatever.
Dildos have pretty much existed since women were invented but there were waaay more practical materials to fashion them from, such as bone and wood. I can't imagine how difficult it would've been to come across a dick carved from crystal in a medieval setting (we all know that is the era these people loosely base their identities off of).
Maybe witches were cramming shiny rocks into their vaginas for the sake of some rituals, but they probably weren't shaped like these pristine phalluses.

Witchblrs are all hypersexual and ugly as sin. Ugly girls always need a gimmick.
 
Last edited:

NoReturn

CEO Wash & Smash llc.
kiwifarms.net
They're cards, not experimental drugs.
The cards say "Straight edge for life".
If she kills the kid, will she put it in the compost?
I've always been told that if something is an offering, you don't eat it because the dead have "eaten" the essence of the food. So it's not good for humans to eat anymore.
[Abortion video]
I was told by the same old ladies who told me the above that an aborted or lost miscarried child comes back for another try. So there are no floating ghost-fetuses, but if you abort a kid he or she might come back as your future child (but could hold a grudge for what happened before) or would just try somewhere else with another family.
The practical idea behind it being to make women who had miscarried feel better, and to teach women who had abortions that they can't just erase what happened.
I would say the answer for all of these is yes but mostly talking about Aleister Crowley, the dude that turned taking it up the ass into a mystical act and wrote poems about semen and shit eating.
Last Podcast on the Left is doing a series on Crowley the time of this post and one of the hosts did a 10/10 reading of one of his poems.
Salt is like spiritual napalm, ancient powerful demons and vengeful spirits can be obliterated with one easy step
Salt is one of those things that is just generally cool and got spiritual powers added to it. Salt is needed for us to stay alive, it preserves food, can help clean and heal wounds, keeps out slugs, can "kill" the land itself, etc. etc. etc.
 

LinkinParkxNaruto[AMV]

I try so hard and got so far
kiwifarms.net
I've always been told that if something is an offering, you don't eat it because the dead have "eaten" the essence of the food. So it's not good for humans to eat anymore.
There are workarounds, the greeks for example killed the animal , the bones and the fat of the animal were burned then people feasted on the meat. According to myth, the gods can only have the bones because they were tricked in a dispute. That's why sacrifices were so popular, if a rich guy decides to sacrifice 20 cows it means the town eats for free that day.

I really like the Santeria version of offerings because its pretty funny. In Santeria/Yoruba all the offerings that people take to the initiations and the rituals are supposed to be for the spirit, right?, but the spirits take control of the medium so the spirits consume the offering through the medium, physically.
So if someone is invited to a santeria ceremony and they give a bottle of rum as offering within the same night they'll see the host of the ceremony or the babalawo who is "channeling the spirit" chugging down the whole bottle when the spirit "enters" them and smoking all the cigars and binge eating all the food, then they had to act like they don't have the biggest hangover ever, because you know, it wasn't them binging, it was, the spirit
 

EnemyStand

kiwifarms.net
There are workarounds, the greeks for example killed the animal , the bones and the fat of the animal were burned then people feasted on the meat. According to myth, the gods can only have the bones because they were tricked in a dispute. That's why sacrifices were so popular, if a rich guy decides to sacrifice 20 cows it means the town eats for free that day.
Yeah, good ol' Prometheus. He was always looking out for humanity. Too bad Zeus got pissy and put him in time out, but hey, no good dead goes unpunished.
I really like the Santeria version of offerings because its pretty funny. In Santeria/Yoruba all the offerings that people take to the initiations and the rituals are supposed to be for the spirit, right?, but the spirits take control of the medium so the spirits consume the offering through the medium, physically.
So if someone is invited to a santeria ceremony and they give a bottle of rum as offering within the same night they'll see the host of the ceremony or the babalawo who is "channeling the spirit" chugging down the whole bottle when the spirit "enters" them and smoking all the cigars and binge eating all the food, then they had to act like they don't have the biggest hangover ever, because you know, it wasn't them binging, it was, the spirit
Yeah, letting spirits in is such a bad idea. Too bad they never figured to just tell everyone the spirit just wanted to taste the stuff.
 

Marshal Mannerheim

Koti, uskonto, ja isänmaa.
kiwifarms.net
So if someone is invited to a santeria ceremony and they give a bottle of rum as offering within the same night they'll see the host of the ceremony or the babalawo who is "channeling the spirit" chugging down the whole bottle when the spirit "enters" them and smoking all the cigars and binge eating all the food, then they had to act like they don't have the biggest hangover ever, because you know, it wasn't them binging, it was, the spirit
Just sounds like a good excuse to get drunk if you ask me.
 

Bixnood

If you have XX chromones if feel bad for you son
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Everything is Apollo this, Aphrodite that. Where is the love for my boy Priapus?
View attachment 1949937



If a pagan revival is what we are after we need to start wearing dick shaped charms and erecting Herm statues with big dicks in our yards. Phallus Worship is the part of ancient religion Percy Jackson left out.
brah, why this painting of me look so old?
 

NoReturn

CEO Wash & Smash llc.
kiwifarms.net
I bring you all a dumbass article that I also posted in A&N:
How Tarot & Astrology Became Black & Brown Women’s North Star
As stigma surrounding non-Christian spiritual practices fade, Black and brown women are reclaiming divination as a tool for self-healing.
Source | Archive

Amber Finney, known as Amber The Alchemist, is steeping a cup of tea when we connect over Google Hangouts. The soft smoke of what is likely sage, incense or palo santo languidly billows from the bottom of her screen. Behind her hangs a tapestry of planets and constellations, as well as a poster illustrating various crystals. Below that sits a table of bottles and oils. Even through a screen, it's exactly the backdrop you’d expect from someone whose life's work includes ancestral healing through rituals and magic.

“I am from Hackensack, New Jersey,” Finney, a tarot reader and spiritual practitioner, says. “My grandparents are from Georgia and South Carolina, so I’m a product of the Great Migration.” Her great-great-grandfather was likely born into slavery, she shares, and was a root worker and healer in the 1800s; her mother, Jeannell, has been practicing divination for decades. Together, Finney and her mother run Brown Girl Alchemy, an online community dedicated to the ascension and healing of Black womanhood. “[My spirituality has] always been within me,” she states with a smile. “The work that I’m doing and the work that my mom is doing is a continuation [of my great-great-grandfather’s work]. We’re bridging the gap and bringing that spiritualism back to our ancestral.”

Finney and her mother aren’t the only ones. In the last 10 years, and especially amidst the COVID-19 pandemic when many have turned to divination as a means of solace and self-healing, Black and brown women have pivoted from Christianity and reconnected with spiritual practices rooted in African, Indigenous, and Latinx ancestry. Many of those practices — like tarot, astrology, and crystal healing — have become increasingly popular on social media, making conversation surrounding non-Christian Black and brown spirituality less taboo. In pop culture, superstars like Beyoncé have paid homage to figures like the Yoruba Orisha Oshun, goddess of female sensuality and fertility. Songs like Princess Nokia’s “Brujas” have become anthems for Black and brown witches everywhere. But before the age of Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram, it was rare that you’d find Black and brown women speaking publicly of sacred practices. Until recently, much of the spiritual community represented online featured a more Eurocentric version of divination — “Black and Silver witchcraft,” a term The Hood Witch’s Bri Luna uses to describe the whitewashed “American Horror Story aesthetic” popular on Tumblr years ago — leaving little room for Black and brown women to feel seen or safe in an already stigmatized space. It’s why the spiritual resurgence happening amongst Black and brown women is more than a revival — it’s a reclamation.

“My grandmother practiced hoodoo. She’s from Louisiana and she lived in Texas,” Luna says. “I feel like most American Black families with Southern roots, there’s magic there, regardless of if they wanna call it that or not.” When she first launched The Hood Witch around 2014, the Los Angeles native — who is of Black and Mexican descent — was one of the only brujas representing Black and brown women in the online world of mysticism. “I was sharing metaphysical information; I was sharing tarot; I was sharing things that were already in my family, doing this visual storytelling [in my way]. I really think that opened doors for other women of color to connect back to their roots. This is something that was long overdue and very necessary.”

In order to understand where spirituality stands today, we look back at where Black spirituality was born, and how our relationship with it has evolved across generations.

The Roots Of Black Diasporic Religion


According to the Pew Research Center, Black Americans are more religious than the American public at-large. Because of this, many — particularly those of older generations — shy away from sharing their non-Christian spiritual practices, lest they risk condemnation from the community. Malorine Mathurin, for example, is a Brooklyn-based intuitive and hellenistic astrologer of Haitian descent, and says she kept her work “under wraps” during her early years as a diviner after being shunned by friends. “I had one friend who actually went and told everyone in junior high school that I was a witch,” she says. “It was very disturbing and very upsetting. People wouldn’t talk to me and would be very wary of me.”

[IMG alt="Divination Illustration

Artist: Eunice Adeyi"]https://www.refinery29.com/images/10332946.png?format=png&width=340&height=409[/IMG]


This type of fear-driven response toward non-Christian spirituality is unfortunately typical from those who adhere to institutional Christianity. But, it didn’t have to be like this. As historical texts show, the word “religion” itself is fraught with a colonialist history. “In fact, the term gained popularity in the sixteenth century and was also imposed on native peoples and their practices during conquest and colonizing regimes,” says Khytie Brown, ethnographer and scholar of African diaspora religions and African American studies, and a research fellow at Princeton University. “‘Knowledge of God’ was often the Euro-Christian deployment of the term in which non-European peoples and their humanity were judged against,” she says. “That is, to ‘have religion’ meant that these cultures and peoples conformed to European notions of a belief in a higher power, usually a monotheistic one, with accompanying practices that they could approximate and compare with Christianity.”

Although Eurocentric Christianity has often been used as a tool of oppression, Black diasporic religion has long been a beacon in the Black community. Religion is both a spiritual and cultural anchor, as Brown describes, and its many forms offer identity and belonging. “In some sense, these practices predate the rupture caused by the TransAtlantic slave trade,” says Kijan Bloomfield, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Rhodes College. “Black religions also developed as a response to the violence of white supremacy. We often describe Black religion in the West as traditions that emerged in the ‘hush harbors’ or spaces that enslaved Blacks gathered in secret to worship and commune beyond the gaze of their white enslavers. However, Black religion also includes Islam and Judaism — both of which are part of a diverse tapestry of Black religious traditions.”

Bloomfield explains that when enslaved Africans were brought to the Americas, they came with their own set of indigenous spiritual and religious practices — including Christianity. As early as 1491, for example, the Kongo Kingdom in Central Africa had adopted Catholicism as its official religion. As a result, some of the people who were enslaved in places like Jamaica and Haiti — where large portions of the enslaved population came from Central Africa, and Kongo specifically — brought with them an African Christian background outside of the Christianity encountered in the new colonies. Conjure and hoodoo (U.S.), vodou (Haiti), and obeah (Jamaica) are all African diasporic religious practices that provided protection and healing. Back in the days of slavery, Black people looked to divination as a salve amid the terror and violence — both physical and psychological — inflicted upon them by entrapment and colonialism.

“Divination is part of this method of accessing knowledge and insight,” Bloomfield adds. “Living in an anti-Black world that continues to denigrate Black existence and ways of knowing, divination provides a powerful tool to ‘see’ and discern the answers to individual and communal problems that are personal and systemic.”

As for tarot and particularly astrology, which is perhaps the most mainstream and widely understood form of divination, Black women have used the stars as their guide for generations. Bloomfield points out that the old spiritual “Follow the Drinking Gourd” is a nod to Harriet Tubman, who used the North Star (the most prominent star in the Big Dipper constellation) to chart the path of the Underground Railroad. And in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Bloomfield adds, the protagonist, a Black teenager named Lauren Olamina, develops a belief system called Earthseed. “The ultimate destination, Lauren argues, is for humans to ‘take root amongst the stars’ — to develop a more liberating framework for community and care. Contemporary astrology, I believe, continues a tradition in which Black people have looked to the universe and it’s wonders to circumvent the kind of Enlightenment logic whose ultimate end led to our enslavement and denigration.”

The Seeding Of Stigma Surrounding Non-Christian Spirituality


The term occult — which is from the French word occulte and directly from the Latin occultus meaning “hidden, concealed, secret” — often carries with it a negative connotation. In the Black Christian community in particular, the word is typically used to describe something that is evil or “of the devil.” It’s synonymous with the terms “pagan” and “magic,” both of which were and still are looked down upon in Black religious spaces.

“I believe this is a common impulse and, in many ways, it is misguided,” says Bloomfield. “Religion practiced by Black people throughout the diaspora is syncretic — it draws on African worldviews about power, the spirit world, and the divine that is always in conversation with Christianity. After all, Christianity was a tool of colonialism which enslaved Africans interpolated with their traditional beliefs.”

[IMG alt="Illustration of Libra Sign
Artist: Eunice Adeyi"]https://www.refinery29.com/images/10332951.png?format=png&width=340&height=276[/IMG]


In Black Magic: Religion and the African American Conjuring Tradition, as Bloomfield notes, author Yvonne Chireau argues that alternative forms of Black religion such as conjure and hoodoo are a complement to African-American Christianity. Bloomfield believes that the suspicion and fear that often shroud divination and occult practices stems from the prominence Christianity achieved within Black diasporic communities, particularly in the U.S. and the Caribbean. “Aligning oneself with Christian values was a strategy to cope with the terror of enslavement and the precarity of Black life, and was also a cloak for more traditional African-derived practices that continued in the New World,” she says. “However, at the apex of the movement for civil rights, Christianity became the primary language to call out the hypocrisy of enslavers and demand justice.”

Finney describes herself and her mother as the “black sheep” of their family, sharing that it wasn’t until this past year when Finney began to receive public attention that she felt comfortable sharing her profession with her family, who are members of the church. “They were like, ‘Okay, somehow you’re accredited, so you must be doing something right,’” she says. “But even still, we don’t talk about it because it’s not for them.”

Afro-Puerto Rican Tarot reader, espiritista, and Ifa Orisha priestess Tatianna Morales — known as Tatianna Tarot — shares a similar story. Born to a Puerto Rican father and a Black mother, Morales says she was raised predominantly by the Puerto Rican side of her family, which is mostly religious with the exception of her father, who is a spiritual medium. “He has studied so many occult and metaphysical topics and is big on personal development, so he and I are like two peas in a pod. This is where I get my juju from.” Her mother’s side of the family, however, is composed of devout Christians, and is “very, very religious.”

“Unfortunately [my mother and I] don’t have a close relationship, but if I were to mention any of this she’d faint and die,” she continues with a laugh. “The irony is that a lot of my gifts come from my Black side of the family. My grandma and my great-great-grandma were practitioners and priestesses in their time in Brooklyn. They did a lot of work for the community [as hairdressers]. So they would essentially mask spiritual workings, spellcasting, and ceremonies that they would do under the guise of them being hairdressers.”

Pandemic Revival & The Future Of Black Mysticism


As the COVID-19 pandemic continues and many people spend more time indoors, the stigma associated with non-Christian, Black religious practices and belief systems is beginning to fade as Black diasporic traditions become more mainstream online. For some, it’s a homecoming. For others, dispelling the negative stereotypes of divination has become a tool of self-healing during a time of loss and trauma.

“The more widespread embrace of Black diasporic traditions I believe is an effort to reclaim ancestral ways of knowing and to assert Black personhood, particularly in the midst of the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and anti-Black racism,” says Bloomfield. Bloomfield’s latest project, Lived Africana Religion in the Time of COVID-19, documents the many ways in which Black communities have sustained their religious practices during this turbulent time in history. “I have learned that communities marginalized by the mainstream Black church — namely Black queer people of faith and practitioners of African traditional religions — have creatively used social media and virtual meeting spaces to reach new audiences and provide opportunities for connection and healing,” Bloomfield says.

[IMG alt="Illustration of Tarot Card - The Empress

Artist: Eunice Adeyi"]https://www.refinery29.com/images/10332966.jpg?format=jpg&width=340&height=583&quality=80[/IMG]


“I think, outside the pandemic, there was always a search for spirituality and wanting to connect spiritually, but there had to be a medium because that’s what we’re taught in religion,” says Finney. “The medium is to connect to Jesus or to go to church to connect to the divine, but I think because we are physically not able to step outside of ourselves, we literally had to step within ourselves and initiate our own healing.”

As accessibility to learning resources increases and the online spiritual community continues to grow, Finney says Black and brown women are realizing they never needed a medium. “We’re getting our spiritual swag back because we’re able to recognize that this is what we do. It’s within us. It’s not something that we ever had to seek.”

R29Unbothered continues its look at Black culture’s tangled history of Black identity, beauty, and contributions to the culture. In 2021, we're giving wings to our roots, learning and unlearning our stories, and celebrating where Black past, present and future meet.
And here's some TikTok's as well:

This chick reminds me of that weird lady from "School of Affluence"




 
Last edited:

fuzzyrodent85

kiwifarms.net
I bring you all a dumbass article that I also posted in A&N:

And here's some TikTok's as well:
View attachment 1953806
This chick reminds me of that weird lady from "School of Affluence"
View attachment 1953807
View attachment 1953822
Am I missing something? That girl was just eating honey basically. I had a teaspoonful of it in my yogurt today, am I going to get my ass kicked by some random bitch's ancestors?
 

NoReturn

CEO Wash & Smash llc.
kiwifarms.net
Am I missing something? That girl was just eating honey basically. I had a teaspoonful of it in my yogurt today, am I going to get my ass kicked by some random bitch's ancestors?
Yeah, you're gonna get your ass kicked by Mielzibub. I'll show myself out.
Looks like someone actually posted about this specific video on reddit: honey on tongue spell from tiktok
1.PNG

1v.PNG

2v.PNG

3v.PNG
 

Similar threads

The homeless, kleptomaniac, meth-addict simulator disguised as a survival game.
Replies
18
Views
1K
Pedophile/pedo apologist and tulpamancer who gets into fictional relationships with a Spyro boss, goblins, and Pokemon, all while shipping herself. Decade reigning cow. TRUE AND HONEST Twin soul sister of OPL. IQ of 62.
Replies
9K
Views
2M
Top