World Opinion: Much Of Argentina Wants Its Populists Back -

ATaxingWoman

Professional Tax Investigator From Ghost World
kiwifarms.net
In Argentina, President Mauricio Macri's election four years ago was a stunner.

For 12 years, the Kirchner family had ruled the country, tugging the dominant Peronist party toward statism and friendships with China, Iran and Venezuela. Macri, a former mayor of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires, was a multimillionaire whose young political coalition celebrated free markets and sought close ties to the United States.

Given the contrast, Macri's election seemed like a historic repudiation of populism.

Indeed, the new president proclaimed a new era, in gestures and policies.

In his first months in the Casa Rosada presidential palace, he slashed budget-busting subsidies for public transportation, electricity and natural gas. He regaled CEOs in Davos, warning against the perils of populism. When he hosted his U.S. counterpart for a state dinner in Buenos Aires in 2016, President Barack Obama danced the tangoin a capital where just two years earlier, the last Argentine president had accused him of plotting her assassination.

But now, Argentines are showing strong signs of buyer's remorse.

After a yearlong economic crisis, Macri's approval rating is below 40%. Polls show him slightly behind his predecessor, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who is running for vice president alongside her former chief of staff, Alberto Fernández.

The Macri campaign's struggles should come as no surprise. Though he remains beloved by Western governments and investors, his pro-market policies are broadly considered a failure at home.

During his term, poverty reached 32%, and unemployment increased to 10.1%. Inflation is expected to be 44% this year — one of the highest rates in the world. By the end of the year, Argentina's economy will be 3.1% smaller than when Macri took office.
It is a small miracle he is even competitive.

His campaign's viability is mostly thanks to a recognition of his dicey inheritance from Fernández de Kirchner; her continued unpopularity; and sympathy for Macri's various misfortunes, including economic troubles in Brazil — Argentina's No. 1 trading partner — and a drought that ravaged the country's farms.

But what is arguably most surprising about Argentina's nail-biting election is the strength of his populist opponents.
After all, memories of Fernández de Kirchner's turbulent administration have hardly faded. She left behind a daunting budget deficit, high inflation and a tangle of market distortions — including price controls, capital controls and trade barriers — that still bedevil her successor and strangle growth.

She still makes regular court appearances in a string of public corruption cases.

But despite their considerable baggage, Alberto Fernández and Fernández de Kirchner offer Argentines a seemingly irresistible promise: a return to generous public spending on infrastructure, government jobs, social programs and higher wages that appeals to a population accustomed to public largess.

Despite the excitement Macri's election generated outside Argentina, it did not reflect a fundamental shift in public opinion in favor of market liberalization.

Macri attracted only 51% of the vote, and his coalition did not win either house of congress. In his campaign, he focused on corruption, crime and public exhaustion with Fernández de Kirchner — and promised to preserve social programs.
In office, he has struggled to overcome the public's skepticism about the free market.

He failed to advance major reforms, including to Argentina's rigid labor code. Though he helped negotiate a historic trade agreement with the European Union, Argentina remains one of the most closed economies in the world.

These policy beliefs have not only complicated Macri's reform agenda, but they have left South America's second-largest economy still vulnerable to populist appeals.

Macri's opponents also have history on their side.

For the last century, Argentina's economy has not performed well under either model. But its experiments with liberalization have left scars. The brutal military junta that governed in the 1970s and early 1980s tried and failed to open the economy. In the 1990s, an iconoclastic Peronist, Carlos Menem, adopted a U.S.-supported economic model that thrived for years but ultimately led to Argentina's 2001 economic collapse and the election of the populist Néstor Kirchner in 2003.

Now, Macri's stumbles are further fueling mistrust of markets.

Argentina's unresolved fight over basic questions of economic management is what makes this election so consequential.
Should Macri eke out a second term, he will have a chance to demonstrate the wisdom of private investment and free trade. The recession is expected to end next year and with inflation slowing, real wages are recovering.

But if Argentines turn to populism once again, their disappointments over the last four years will heavily burden the next outsider who dares to promise market solutions to Argentina's chronic economic maladies.
 
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Irwin M. Felcher

immediate regret
kiwifarms.net
For the last century, Argentina's economy has not performed well under either model. But its experiments with liberalization have left scars. The brutal military junta that governed in the 1970s and early 1980s tried and failed to open the economy. In the 1990s, an iconoclastic Peronist, Carlos Menem, adopted a U.S.-supported economic model that thrived for years but ultimately led to Argentina's 2001 economic collapse and the election of the populist Néstor Kirchner in 2003.
Now, Macri's stumbles are further fueling mistrust of markets.
Argentina's unresolved fight over basic questions of economic management is what makes this election so consequential.
Should Macri eke out a second term, he will have a chance to demonstrate the wisdom of private investment and free trade. The recession is expected to end next year and with inflation slowing, real wages are recovering.
"This shit has never worked before, and it's not working now. But stick with it, it might start working any second."

Literally.
 

nonvir_1984

Never amount to anything! And they were right.
kiwifarms.net
What is that definition of fanatic? Doing the same thing over and over but expecting a different result.
But I guess, it save us the cost of deporting them. SEND THEM BACK!
 
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los pepes

kiwifarms.net
The ones that have to flee the communist hellholes usually tend to be. The Cubans down in Miami aren't going to vote for any kind of socialist nonsense. They've seen first hand what happens when you keep promising to give everyone everything they could want.
And then their kids grow up with our (((culture))) and by the time they are 18 they hate white people and vote communist.
 

Ped Xing

!Bigfoot! sightings please call 908-314-7784
kiwifarms.net
Remember this the next time someone says “hispanics are natural conservatives”
They're natural jesus jumpers. For some reason that's linked to capitalism in America. I don't understand it, and it doesn't keep the ameribeaners from siding with people who despise their religion and way of life, so long as the gibs are gud.
 

IAmNotAlpharius

For the Emperor?!
kiwifarms.net
And then their kids grow up with our (((culture))) and by the time they are 18 they hate white people and vote communist.
Cubans helped Trump win Florida. They still mostly support Trump. This is largely because many of the Cubans that immigrated were pushed out of Cuba for being middle class and/or right wing. Most Latin Americans that come here though are from left wing regions. Overall, the throw commies out of copter nationalists are less likely to immigrate here.
 

Tasty Tatty

kiwifarms.net
Remember this the next time someone says “hispanics are natural conservatives”
Latinos, on average, are. I know, I've lived there for the past 15 years. Especially the indigenous population where the notion of family is very important for them. Even those who are more modern still consider their link to their origins (both cultural and personal) a big deal.

Argentinia is a different case. Most Argentinian population are white and no, it's not a meme. It's true. Their numbers are changing, but the percentage of whites is higher than in USA (89% to 60%) because their main migration was from Italy and Germany happened after they get rid of most of their native population and never had the chance to mix like it happened with neighbors such as Paraguay or Bolivia.

They don't consider themselves "white", though, but genetically, they are. And. unlike other S. American populations, they have little connections to their past. I worked with an Argentinian years ago and he told me precisely that: "Bolivians or Mexicans have a culture, but we don't really have any of that in that way here to feel any pride". It's not like they aren't proud of their country (they're extremely patriotic) is just that it's different for them. They're practically like Americans. They know they probably have some indigenous roots, they know indigenous lived there before them, but it's not an important aspect of their lives and it's not part of their everyday culture. The pride a Mexican probably feels for the Mayans, they feel it over Maradona or Messi.

About why they are Socialists, it's very specific. I dated an Argentinian who was very much against feminism, social justice, and all that nonsense, and was even very conservative about family. But he was still a leftist and had a natural dislike for the Right and the military. For them, the idea of the welfare state is an obligation due to their high levels of poverty (many Italians who landed there were very poor). The reason they can't escape it is because Peron was a hard right winger who started giving socialists and activists of the time a free card to do whatever they want as soon as they kept him in power. And the immigrants who kept arriving (from Italy, yes), arrived to a society that was forming with socialist ideas from the start.

Also, don't mix the average person from Buenos Aires with Argentinians. The ones who ended up living in the country side are based.


Context: a group of vegans went to protest a rodeo-like festival and the cowboys chased them with horses and kicked their asses. Most of the population are siding with the cowboys and when they were brought to TV, they attacked pro-abortion ideas and came out as hard conservatives, winning even more support. Watch the final part for extreme lol.

tl;dr, Argentinians are not necessarily the norm about Latinos, but they are trying to change for good.
 

Ahriman

Vivere Militare Est.
kiwifarms.net
Because one should be able to fix over 12 years of mismanagement (it's actually much longer than that), automagically, within 4 years. Cope some more.

I agree that Macri has been very soft (he is center-left) regarding many things and had he been much more stringent about it he could have done much more, but it's still a huge difference compared to what we had. That fucker Cristina was rubbing shoulders with Maduro, of course many people voted "fuck no". On top of that, the venezuelan immigrants are already redpilled when it comes to anything remotely socialist and steer clear from that, so the left trying to appeal to them doesn't really work out.

Ultimately, the article kinda pokes fun at us for being suckers for punishment (and it's true), but it goes back to the Perón years and it's still the thorn on the side of Argentina for quite a long time. It's decades and decades of brainwashing and crooked politicians still appealing to their "gibsmedat" welfare entitlement. Perhaps by the time I'm old we'll fully get "deperonized", but I dunno.
 

Damn Near

It's lovely to be here, thank you for having me
kiwifarms.net
The ones that have to flee the communist hellholes usually tend to be. The Cubans down in Miami aren't going to vote for any kind of socialist nonsense. They've seen first hand what happens when you keep promising to give everyone everything they could want.
the cubans in Miami are mostly white europeans
 

Tasty Tatty

kiwifarms.net
I agree that Macri has been very soft (he is center-left)
Macri is a progressive. Many S. American presidents of the Right are progressives too. Only Bolsonaro isn't.

That's why I don't like to think much about this as R vs L, but normal human vs Progressives.

Also Fidel was directly from Spain
Fidel was white. Also was Che Guevara, who was not only white, but hated indigenous and blacks.

Of course, tell people they were white supremacists (because that's what they were!) and they're gonna say you're a racist instead or worst, BUT MUH AMERICAN IMPERIALISM.

sorry double post!
 

Apoth42

Hehe xd
kiwifarms.net
Remember this the next time someone says “hispanics are natural conservatives”
Latin American social conservatism is kinda leftwing.

Free market neolibs want to privatize communal lands and promote LGBT while blue collar folks want to keep things as they are. Turns out that installing right wing dictatorships makes people view right wing leaders as traitors.
 
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