Programming thread -

Splendid

Castigat ridendo mores
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Its not the absolute worst case scenario, but it's close.
https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/334900/official-faq-on-gender-pronouns-and-code-of-conduct-changes?cb=1

The mod whose firing started it all seems to have not been reinstated.
They're currently at -3 on their own website. They've been way lower before, but it looks like the user base is divided.
The only difference between what was specilated to be in it amd what wasn't is yhat regular users may choose to disengage with other users, but you can't choose not to use someone's pronouns.

People who aren't fans of the current party line on trans issues may simply choose to diengage with the site instead.

Update: they're now at -52 and falling. This kne looks like it's bombing hard.

The top rated comment is someone asking if the mods can have a policy allowing them to outright remove mentions of pronouns from questions on technical sites.
 
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Coolio55

DON'T CALL LUIGI AT 3AM!! *OMG HE RICKROLLED ME*
kiwifarms.net
Anyone ever tangled with Raylib? Seems like a cool little C library for game programming but literally no compiler I've used likes it and I get errors up the ass.
It's both funny and sad that it's easier to include SDL than a library supposedly for beginners.
 
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Troonos

Splame Durnal
kiwifarms.net
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
2) If you're self-taught, how do you know when you're good enough to actually start applying to jobs?
3) Will anyone hire you without a CS or Engineering degree? I have a bachelor's degree, but it has nothing to do with tech.
4) How's the work-life balance of programming jobs? Do they have a high or low turnover rate? Good job satisfaction?
 

Wingus Dongshire

kiwifarms.net
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
2) If you're self-taught, how do you know when you're good enough to actually start applying to jobs?
3) Will anyone hire you without a CS or Engineering degree? I have a bachelor's degree, but it has nothing to do with tech.
4) How's the work-life balance of programming jobs? Do they have a high or low turnover rate? Good job satisfaction?
For one and two, HackerRank

The free version offers some competency tests for a bunch of languages that you can clear to get a baseline for employability.

I think most code monkeys nowadays don't even have a CS degree, it's kind of a flooded market especially with fiverr/outsource firms so why pay extra?

4 depends entirely on what kind of programming job you take. If you're like... an in-house programmer for a company just working on internal infrastructure it's pretty calm but if you do programming for a product it can get fucked up.
 

Joey Caruso

The Coathanger In Your Man's Vagina
kiwifarms.net
Can anyone recommend me a good free C# IDE? I absolutely despise Visual Studio and am looking for something without all the bloat lmao. Bonus points if it comes with a built-in form editor.
 

Wingus Dongshire

kiwifarms.net
Can anyone recommend me a good free C# IDE? I absolutely despise Visual Studio and am looking for something without all the bloat lmao. Bonus points if it comes with a built-in form editor.
I get VS Enterprise through my work so I've not used any other ISEs in a while (i'm too addicted to the rewind debugging) but Eclipse has a C# plugin that might work for you.
 

Marvin

Christorical Figure
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
For one and two, HackerRank

The free version offers some competency tests for a bunch of languages that you can clear to get a baseline for employability.

I think most code monkeys nowadays don't even have a CS degree, it's kind of a flooded market especially with fiverr/outsource firms so why pay extra?

4 depends entirely on what kind of programming job you take. If you're like... an in-house programmer for a company just working on internal infrastructure it's pretty calm but if you do programming for a product it can get fucked up.
Agree with most of this, but I find hackerrank to be too abstract and divorced from real software development to be a good test of competency in the field. Working small freelance jobs is a better test, I think.
 
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Gorilla Tessellator

kiwifarms.net
Can anyone recommend me a good free C# IDE? I absolutely despise Visual Studio and am looking for something without all the bloat lmao. Bonus points if it comes with a built-in form editor.
VS is the best IDE for C# hands down. If you think about it, it was like made for it.
Can you elaborate what makes you hate it?
@Troonos
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
2) If you're self-taught, how do you know when you're good enough to actually start applying to jobs?
3) Will anyone hire you without a CS or Engineering degree? I have a bachelor's degree, but it has nothing to do with tech.
4) How's the work-life balance of programming jobs? Do they have a high or low turnover rate? Good job satisfaction?
About getting job as a self-taught programmer: from what I understand it's harder now than 5-10 years ago, because there are more of CS majors, who also have to compete with H1Bs.

However, I think if you create some significant projects, then you can get a job.
 

Wingus Dongshire

kiwifarms.net
VS is the best IDE for C# hands down. If you think about it, it was like made for it.
Can you elaborate what makes you hate it?
@Troonos

About getting job as a self-taught programmer: from what I understand it's harder now than 5-10 years ago, because there are more of CS majors, who also have to compete with H1Bs.

However, I think if you create some significant projects, then you can get a job.
In all honesty, the best way to get a programming job is to have a significant level of contribution to FOSS projects that you can add to a portfolio; an employer will always value practical experience versus a degree for the theoretical. Either way, it IS a flooded fucking market and your best bet is to diversify your work range to extend to shit like infosec or network administration so you have more range for gaining employment then try to move internally
 

Skwid

not even god can save us
kiwifarms.net
From what I've noticed(and keep in mind this is coming from a NEET with no prior programming jobs. also >powerlevel) it seems to me that people are hiring for either python positions, and java positions. Python tends to be newer things and java tends to be just keeping a 10+ year old backend functional. That's just what I've heard from friends in the bizz. Javascript in my opinion seems useful to know anyways, whether you plan to learn it for a job or not. Makes some things on the web a shit ton easier.

Also I do know for a fact that going to college to get a CS degree is useless, get certifications and experience. Programming jobs are like bartending. You can show up with a degree and get laughed at because you have a useless degree and no experience under your belt.
 
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omnihitler

kiwifarms.net
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
2) If you're self-taught, how do you know when you're good enough to actually start applying to jobs?
3) Will anyone hire you without a CS or Engineering degree? I have a bachelor's degree, but it has nothing to do with tech.
4) How's the work-life balance of programming jobs? Do they have a high or low turnover rate? Good job satisfaction?
Roughly, for me as a hiring manager to consider a self-taught person who has no prior experience (to even get to the interview), they need to demonstrate proficiency with:

- a backend language
- relational databases
- unit and integration tests
- javascript, html, and CSS
- running a web app on a linux server

The only way to demonstrate this is with live projects and a github/gitlab/whatever. If you don't have a CS degree, I can't assume you have any sort of familiarity with CS subjects, algorithmic complexity and data structures being the key ones. You have to make up the deficit with skills that a new CS grad won't have.

If you can afford it, it's going to be easier to do a postbacc or a master's in CS instead. If that's not in the cards, some startups move people into dev jobs from adjacent roles (support or QA) if they prove themselves and learn outside of work. The self-teaching directly to developer job route is really difficult. It was difficult when I did it a few years ago and it's probably a lot harder now that the entry-level market is flooded.
 
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Shoggoth

kiwifarms.net
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
2) If you're self-taught, how do you know when you're good enough to actually start applying to jobs?
3) Will anyone hire you without a CS or Engineering degree? I have a bachelor's degree, but it has nothing to do with tech.
4) How's the work-life balance of programming jobs? Do they have a high or low turnover rate? Good job satisfaction?
1. yes, but hard
2. I'll ask some folks I know who did the transition, applies to 3 as well.
4. not bad
Good luck bucko
 

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Yotsubaaa

Eric Ciaramella is the whistleblower
kiwifarms.net
Can anyone recommend me a good free C# IDE? I absolutely despise Visual Studio and am looking for something without all the bloat lmao. Bonus points if it comes with a built-in form editor.
Depending on what you need it for, have you had a look at MonoDevelop perhaps? I haven't used it myself recently, but back when I did use it it seemed decent enough (a little buggy sometimes, I guess). It also has its Stetic Form Designer built-in.

However that said, I want to emphasize what @Gorilla Tessellator said too:
VS is the best IDE for C# hands down. If you think about it, it was like made for it.
That cannot possibly be overstated. In fact, I hesitated to suggest MonoDevelop at first precisely because it always felt like a bargain-bin replacement for Visual Studio whenever I used it for anything.
 
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Splendid

Castigat ridendo mores
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Just use Visual Studio, it's really good. If you must use something else try Resharper (it's not free IIRC, but I think it's like $60 a year) or Visual Studio Vode (which is a text editor, not an IDE.)
 
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yahooligan

MAX HEADSPACE 2020: MAKE GIFS GREAT AGAIN
kiwifarms.net
Just use Visual Studio, it's really good. If you must use something else try Resharper (it's not free IIRC, but I think it's like $60 a year) or Visual Studio Vode (which is a text editor, not an IDE.)
I dunno, depending on the platform, VS Code does debugging, variable watch, library management, git, etc. It's not a fully-featured IDE, but it's much better than that PlatformIO on Atom bullshit that everyone was recommending last year. I've been using it a lot over the last few months and it seems to hit the "just right" point for my own cases.
 

AmpleApricots

kiwifarms.net
1) Is it plausible to self-teach a programming language well enough that a company will actually give you a job?
Yes. A lot of "programmers" with fancy degrees are absolutely unable to program without access to google and stackexchange. It's worth gold and always impressive if you can point out (an) actual good project/s (e.g. rewriting "ls" in rust doesn't count) you've actually done yourself or are considerable part of. (means your only git commits aren't CoC-related) To competent people this can be worth more than any degree. You'd be surprised at how many graduates can't even write a tiny program without any preperation (or internet connection) when prompted. (search for "fizzbuzz" for examples of this)

Also math, math, math. Shockingly big amount of "programmers" that are on a barely-highschool math level. (and below) Many will tell you you don't need to be good at math to be a programmer and I guess that's true but if you aren't you'll always be very mediocre, believe me, that is also true. Look at older books for learning, don't use some random online tutorials or ebooks, in my experience they're often just not that good. You don't need to be physicist-level proficient at math but it can be just so incredibly helpful in problem solving. That all being said, maybe consider another industry and keep it as a hobby. Working in that industry sucks often and hard.

--
I've started doing things in Forth again for the first time in I dunno, decades. What a beautiful language for some uses. There's also nothing more fun than being able to redefine the meaning of the number 3.
 
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