Protecting your smartphone against the sponsors of ISIS - Smashing the screen won't do it

3119967d0c

a... brain - @StarkRavingMad
True & Honest Fan
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NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) has conducted an analysis of various tools meant for stealing data from your smartphone.
Coverage of this is quite bad so far. For example, Android devices support file encryption. The reports do not seem to show whether this was used in any cases, or whether it was effective- or why it was ineffective if not. However, it does demonstrate what measures they have available to them.

Long story short- they have very good methods for recovering binary data from fairly intact phone boards via the JTAG debug ports, and if storage chips are still physically intact on the board, they can recover from those directly too. In the case of the JTAG ports, this is something DHS can do while they take your phone at the border- if they don't do something more malicious, that is.

The only real differences are in how good various software provided by surveillance companies to analyze that data work. That is no real comfort.
https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2020/02/04/nist-tests-methods-of-recovering-data-from-smashed-smartphones/
A phone which can be physically accessed by the enemies of humanity is not secure. If you are in a situation where there is important data on your phone, and getting rid of it is imperative, using a large hammer to destroy everything on the logic board seems like the best option.

And of course, never use off-site backups to the clown. You might as well send your dick pics to press@fbi.gov
 

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or else it gets the drill again
kiwifarms.net
Who is the "enemies of humanity" though? I would hardly trust the American spy agencies.
 

3119967d0c

a... brain - @StarkRavingMad
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Who is the "enemies of humanity" though? I would hardly trust the American spy agencies.
Indeed, this is the enemies of humanity testing the products that the sponsors of ISIS (Cellebrite et al) provide to them.

If they are so bold as to actually admit that they can attack your security- you should take that under advisement.
 
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