SAT to Give Students ‘Adversity Score’ to Capture Social and Economic Background - Asians & whites gtfo

Azovka

I coulda been a contender
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SAT to Give Students ‘Adversity Score’ to Capture Social and Economic Background

New score comes as college admissions decisions are under scrutiny


By Douglas Belkin
May 16, 2019 5:30 a.m.

The College Board plans to assign an adversity score to every student who takes the SAT to try to capture their social and economic background, jumping into the debate raging over race and class in college admissions.

This new number, called an adversity score by college admissions officers, is calculated using 15 factors including the crime rate and poverty levels from the student’s high school and neighborhood. Students won’t be told the scores, but colleges will see the numbers when reviewing their applications.


Fifty colleges used the score last year as part of a beta test. The College Board plans to expand it to 150 institutions this fall, and then use it broadly the following year.
How colleges consider a student’s race and class in making admissions decisions is hotly contested. Many colleges, including Harvard University, say a diverse student body is part of the educational mission of a school.

A lawsuit accusing Harvard of discriminating against Asian-American applicants by holding them to a higher standard is awaiting a judge’s ruling. Lawsuits charging unfair admission practices have also been filed against the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hilland the University of California system.

Adversity Index
College Board's new tool seeks to provide environmental context behind students’ test scores by measuring adversity in their neighborhoods, families and schools.

Source: College Board

The College Board, the New York based nonprofit that oversees the SAT, said it has worried about income inequality influencing test results for years. White students scored an average of 177 points higher than black students and 133 points higher than Hispanic students in 2018 results. Asian students scored 100 points higher than white students. The children of wealthy and college-educated parents outperformed their classmates.

“There are a number of amazing students who may have scored less [on the SAT] but have accomplished more,” said David Coleman, chief executive of the College Board. “We can’t sit on our hands and ignore the disparities of wealth reflected in the SAT.”

The SAT, which includes math and verbal sections and is still taken with No. 2 pencils, is facing challenges. Federal prosecutors revealed this spring that students cheated on both the SAT and ACT for years as part of a far-reaching college admissions cheating scheme. In Asia and the Middle East, both the ACT and SAT exams have experienced security breaches.

Yale University is one of the schools that has tried using applicants’ adversity scores. Yale has pushed to increase socioeconomic diversity and, over several years, has nearly doubled the number of low-income and first-generation-to-attend-college students to about 20% of newly admitted students, said Jeremiah Quinlan, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Yale.

“This [adversity score] is literally affecting every application we look at,” he said. “It has been a part of the success story to help diversify our freshman class.”
Colleges could glean some of the information that the adversity score reflects from other parts of a student’s application. But having the score makes comparisons more consistent, Mr. Quinlan said.

The Score Gap

Average SAT scores, broken down by income, race and parents' education levels, show disparities.

James Conroy, director of college counseling at New Trier High School, which serves several affluent and mostly white communities north of Chicago, said the focus on diversity by elite colleges is already high and the adversity score would magnify that.

“My emails are inundated with admissions officers who want to talk to our diversity kids,” Mr. Conroy said. “Do I feel minority students have been discriminated against? Yes, I do. But I see the reversal of it happening right now.”

The College Board tried a similar effort two decades ago but quickly dropped it amid pushback from colleges. In 1999, after California and Washington voted to ban affirmative-action preferences in public education, the College Board created a program it called Strivers.

The program aimed to measure the challenges students faced. It created an expected SAT score based on socioeconomic factors including, if schools chose to add it, race. Students who scored at least 200 points more on the SAT than predicted were called Strivers. Because minorities often had lower predicted scores, they were more likely to be Strivers.

The adversity score, by contrast, doesn’t take into account race and is superior because it is steeped in more research, said Connie Betterton, vice president for higher education access and strategy at the College Board.

“Since it is identifying strengths in students, it’s showing this resourcefulness that the test alone cannot measure,” Mr. Coleman, the College Board CEO, said. “These students do well, they succeed in college.”


At Florida State University, SAT adversity scores helped boost nonwhite enrollment in the incoming freshman class, said John Barnhill, assistant vice president for academic affairs.
PHOTO: DENNIS MACDONALD /ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

The new score—which falls on a scale of one through 100—will pop up on something called the Environmental Context Dashboard, which shows several indicators of relative poverty, wealth and opportunity as well as a student’s SAT score compared with those of their classmates. On the dashboard, the score is called “Overall Disadvantage Level.”

An adversity score of 50 is average. Anything above it designates hardship, below it privilege.

The College Board declined to say how it calculates the adversity score or weighs the factors that go into it. The data that informs the score comes from public records such as the U.S. Census as well as some sources proprietary to the College Board, Mr. Coleman said.
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Imagine being downgraded and all your hard work going down the drain because your parents aren’t black and poor enough?
 

Notan Alte

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbpJ5EAQvlQ
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
My question, which I didn't really see addressed, is are they adding points to brainlets or deducting points from competent people? I don't remember exactly what I got, but superscored from all my tests, it was ~1400. If I was applying to some school and my score got dropped by like 200 points cus tyrone's parents are crack addicts, words could not describe how pissed I'd be.
 

JosephStalin

Vozhd
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
What's next, adding such points to these "students"" papers/tests? Adding such points to these "students'" GREs, MCATs, LSATs, and other pre-admissions tests?

I believe the truly good student, regardless of race or socioeconomic class, can get into college and succeed without such "help" on the SAT. Matter of fact, this may and should mean nothing to college admissions officers who truly want to get only the best students into their schools. It will be interesting to see the admissions rates, at least to the most selective schools, for students who have gotten such "help".

Seriously, would you knowingly want to entrust your life/freedom/health/business/money/etc. to someone who needed this break to even get into college? I don't think so.

This is as fucked up as a football bat.

My question, which I didn't really see addressed, is are they adding points to brainlets or deducting points from competent people? I don't remember exactly what I got, but superscored from all my tests, it was ~1400. If I was applying to some school and my score got dropped by like 200 points cus tyrone's parents are crack addicts, words could not describe how pissed I'd be.
I can see lawsuits coming up for exactly this reason.
 

Dutch Courage

Curious Onlooker
kiwifarms.net
I will try not to powerlevel, but let's just say I once was in a position where I was intimately familiar with SAT tests to the point where I could nearly reconstruct one from memory alone.

Honestly, if you can figure out what a dependent clause is, how to conjugate a verb, how to make an inference from a written passage, and how to do basic algebra, you have won half the battle. And all of that can be mastered in a month, if not a week. There is nothing racially biased about the material (on the contrary, every SAT takes care to include literature by, for, or about women's suffrage, civil rights activists, and artists or writers of color to the point of cliche), and frankly, scoring 1500+ is not an act of genius; if you pay attention and use common sense, you should be disappointed with a 1500 score.

I shudder at the thought of either bonus points for stupid kids, or penalty points for smart ones. This is not a rational way of ensuring a bright future for the kids or the country, and such flawed reasoning could only have been dreamt up by people who scored no more than 1150 or so themselves.

Frankly, if you are unfortunate enough not to be from a privileged race (that would be any race except white), you might as well drop out. Colleges won't take you; most "diversity" programs ensure that whites number about a third of the student body, and non-whites two thirds (check out any state university campus, if you don't believe me). How much more help do non-whites need to get into college?

Fuckin' hell, let smart kids who pass the SAT without help into college, and the rest can go to community college. Being poor does not mean you are incapable of studying. Abraham Lincoln was fucking poor, after all. Look how he turned out.
 

thismanlies

The Funnest Part of Gaming is Looting Corpses.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
There is a silver lining to this. If you're Indian and dark enough, you can pretend to be black and get into any college you want.

Honestly, I am about as black as Gandhi.

Once upon a time, I was an ethically challenged, hard-partying Indian American frat boy enjoying my third year of college. That is until I realized I didn’t have the grades or test scores to get into medical school.

Legitimately.

Still, I was determined to be a doctor and discovered that affirmative action provided a loophole that might help.

The only problem? I wasn’t a minority. So I became one.

I shaved my head, trimmed my long Indian eyelashes, and applied as an African American. Not even my own frat brothers recognized me. I joined the Organization of Black Students and used my middle name, Jojo.

Vijay, the Indian American frat boy, became Jojo, the African American med school applicant.

Not everything went as planned. During a med school interview, an African American doctor angrily confronted me for not being black. Cops harassed me. Store clerks accused me of shoplifting. Women were either scared of me or found my bald black dude look sexually mesmerizing. What started as a scam to get into med school turned into a twisted social experiment, teaching me lessons I would never have learned in the classroom.

I became a serious contender at some of America’s greatest schools, including Harvard, Wash U, UPenn, Case Western, George Washington, Pitt, Yale, Rochester, Nebraska, and Columbia. I interviewed at 11 schools while posing as a black man. After all that, I finally got accepted into medical school.

Almost Black: The True Story of How I Got into Medical School by Pretending to Be Black combines the comic tone of 1986’s Soul Man, starring C. Thomas Howell, Rae Dawn Chong, and James Earl Jones, with the deeply poignant observations of Black Like Me, John Howard Griffin’s classic.

Resembling a mashup of the two works (but far more humorous), the hedonistic frat boy discovered something far more than what he’d bargained for while posing as a black man: the seriousness, complexities, and infuriating injustice of America’s racial problems. In Black Like Me, Griffin was a white man posing as a black man in the American South, prior to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. I wasn’t on some intense social mission like he was, but just as Griffin did, I came away changed.

Before I finished this book, I stirred a hornet’s nest by telling the story. It’s been featured on more than 100 media outlets, including CNN, ABC, NBC, FOX, TIME, The Guardian, National Review, Washington Post, Salon, Gawker, VOX, VICE, Complex, Buzz Feed, Huffington Post, Daily Mail, and Perez Hilton. Many loved it, but not everyone approved of what I did. My college classmate, Tucker Max (I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell), disapproved. My sister, Mindy Kaling (The Office / The Mindy Project), furiously declared, “This book will bring shame on our family!

I’ll let you be the judge.
 

The Pink Panther

The Dumb Squash From Lugash
kiwifarms.net
There is a silver lining to this. If you're Indian and dark enough, you can pretend to be black and get into any college you want.



Once again, debunking the myth of "we nigguhz are looked at as animals by society" and "you have to work twice as hard as a black man". Act oppressed and everything will be given to you.
 

Safir

kiwifarms.net
My question, which I didn't really see addressed, is are they adding points to brainlets or deducting points from competent people? I don't remember exactly what I got, but superscored from all my tests, it was ~1400. If I was applying to some school and my score got dropped by like 200 points cus tyrone's parents are crack addicts, words could not describe how pissed I'd be.
In a runoff with you vs Tyrone, you should be pissed either way.

If people study for certain portions of the SAT, they will also work to improve their adversity score as well.
Exactly.

> This new number, called an adversity score by college admissions officers, is calculated using 15 factors including the crime rate and poverty levels from the student’s high school and neighborhood.

Enroll in a shitty school and "move" to a shitty neighborhood right before college.
 

Stab You in the Back

kiwifarms.net
How much more help do non-whites need to get into college?
The answer is always more.

I remember a few years back, black students were complaining because colleges were forcing them to take non-credit remedial math and english classes because they were leaving high school without the skills they needed to succeed in college. Their demand wasn't that the classes were unnecessary, but that they should have been given college credit for taking them.

Being a striver is nice. Being the first person in your family to blah blah blah is cool. Getting out of the ghetto, enduring systemic racism or whatever dumb sob story these kids have... totally awesome. But the truth is that the skill gap doesn't just vanish because little Shaniqua or Tyrone got into the Ivy League. You want to fix admissions? Raise better children. By the time they graduate high school, its too late.

My question, which I didn't really see addressed, is are they adding points to brainlets or deducting points from competent people? I don't remember exactly what I got, but superscored from all my tests, it was ~1400. If I was applying to some school and my score got dropped by like 200 points cus tyrone's parents are crack addicts, words could not describe how pissed I'd be.
Strive harder next time.
 
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