So I figured out why everyone is talking about alien visitation, the danger of vaccinations, and the origin of coronavirus... - It was the RAND Corporation

  • Emails (registration / password reset) appear to be working; be sure to check spam.

Haim Arlosoroff

Archpolitician June Lapercal
kiwifarms.net
So, as with me, I'm assuming everyone is noticing Bill Gates, the Wuhan Lab Origin Hypothesis, and UFOs have gotten a major boost in public legitimacy and people who normally you and I would never think would discuss UFOs and other things because they're NPCs have been gushing with UFO bullshit. I wondered what could have caused a sudden explosion of public interest in UFOs? theblackvault.com owner John Greenewald filed a series of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests & obtained the newly digitized documents which the CIA said represents the entirety of its UFO collection. But why now, and why are the media covering it?

Well, as part of their effort to confront "emerging threats" and "incubate new technology to help create a safer world", Social media platforms were concerned about malicious or harmful uses of their services yet again, and as part of their effort to combat harmful content on their platforms, Google’s Jigsaw unit asked the RAND research team to help answer a difficult question: How can we better detect the spread of conspiracy theories at scale? The research was completed in January 2021. Long story short, the scale of text on the internet is so vast that even large teams of humans can detect or flag only a fraction of harmful or malicious conspiracy theory language. Only machines can operate at that speed and scale. So RAND built another censoring device. This is where it gets long winded:

Their research team mixed Machine-Learning and qualitative research to better understand and detect online conspiracy talk by using the following methods:
  • The first part of the study was a review of existing scholarly literature on conspiracy theories, followed by a text-mining analysis to try to understand how various conspiracies function rhetorically.
  • The second part of the study was building improved ML models to detect conspiracy theories at scale.
To better understand how conspiracy theories function, first they pulled data from Twitter that characterized four separate conspiracy theories about the existence of alien visitation, the danger of vaccinations, the origin of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and the possibility of white genocide (WG).

The alien visitation conspiracy theory offered them a marked contrast to the others they felt; Its very important that we understand that they felt it provided an example of an ideology that appears relatively benign. Something they could engage with deeper, fiddle with, and attempt to mold. Yes, the RAND corporation is doing a gay-op. Yes, this is how the federal government sees its labor cattle, not as citizens but as distant data points which might be adjusted into a more optimum state. For them.

Then they conducted a mixed-method analysis of online conspiracy theory language, using computer text-mining to detect patterns in their conspiracy theory data sets along with human qualitative analysis to make sense of how those patterns function persuasively. For this effort, they used the stance analysis capabilities in RAND-Lex. Stance analysis is a text-mining approach used to determine how speakers represent the world linguistically—the style and tone that point to the sociocultural part of language. They had used stance previously by itself in previous modeling efforts and gotten "good results"—for example, when detecting Russian interference in elections solely through rhetorical style. One example is certainty: a writer could choose to use hedging language (“I think,” “maybe,” “it’s possible that”) or to use epistemic certainty markers (“we know,” “it has been shown,” “there is”). Those are representational choices that speakers make in attempting to achieve social effects (such as persuasion) within cultural contexts (such as genre and setting).

Rich Descriptions of Conspiracy Theories (RAND's Term and this is important: these are the federal think-tanks choices in language when they talk about citizenry. Never forget how much you seem like a lab rat to them. All policy papers in Congress look like this when the Washington think-tanks write about you.)
05c4ed932b6eaa60e9a917f27c65ede1ec472722c85390b6ec704c3aad99395e.jpg
  • Alien conspiracy speech was linguistically distinctive by its wide variety of stance features with small effect sizes, such as spatial relations (‘travel to’), social closeness (‘us’), uncertainty (‘it’s possible’), authority sources (‘the government’), contingent reasoning (‘could be’), and looking back (‘long ago’). Using stances relating to spatial relations, social closeness, uncertainty, and looking back makes sense when suggesting the possibility that aliens have traveled to visit Earth, especially if this is framed as having happened in an ancient past. Unlike the antivaccination and WG conspiracies, there was little talk from detractors opposing any theories. Another feature of this data set was the expression of clearly developed conspiracies about government coverups of alien visitation. Comments suggest there is a large distrust of the government and what the government is telling the American public (‘secret space program,’ ‘it’s classified’). Personal roles figured in talk about aliens (‘alien leader,’ ‘reptilian aliens’). There were more one-off comments and invitations to watch documentary videos or lectures on aliens than there were arguments with detractors. Regardless of the truth of this conspiracy theory, it seems much more innocuous than the other conspiracies we studied, with no antisocial component or direct threat to public health.
IMG_6446.PNG
  • Pro-vaccinator participants responding in these conversations often used derisive comments (‘yaddah yaddah, vaccine injuries, yaddah, yaddah,’ ‘fake vaccine injuries’). So, in addition to expressing distrust of vaccine safety, anti-vaccinators expressed anger over feeling bullied (‘bullying a mother of a vaccine injured kid?!’ ‘abusing parents of vaccine-injured children’). Public vice language was featured in heated arguments between anti-vaccinators (‘the evidence is in vaccine-injured kids,’ ‘fraud vaccines’) and pro-vaccinators. Anti-vaccinators also expressed fear of vaccine injuries and anger or frustration over vaccine injuries being ignored (‘vaccines do harm!’ ‘vaccine injuries are no laughing matter’). Many negative and angry comments apparently stemmed from anti-vaccinators not feeling validated (‘quit ignoring vaccine injured kids!’). In sum, anti-vaccinators talked about vaccines as unsafe, expressed frustration at dismissed claims of vaccine injuries, and, as they see it, being bullied for not wanting to put their children in harm’s way. They expressed distrust of vaccine validation studies, articulated a conflict of interest with past validation studies, and said that vaccines cause injuries or other diseases. They reported feeling bullied and seemed emotional, mostly expressing distrust, anger, fear, and frustration over vaccine safety and ignored vaccine injuries. In terms of argument, antivaccinators used selective scientific authorities, doctors, and celebrity endorsements to dispute claims of pro-vaccinators.
IMG_6429.PNG
  • Overall, the key features of the COVID-19 conspiracy group are that its members are most concerned with the (perceived) malicious origins of COVID-19 and that they distrust news sources, instead sharing alternative sources of information. The group is new and has not yet settled on the pandemic’s origins; several sources and theories are being shared, and few detractors are commenting. The group does not discuss public health dimensions of pandemic (e.g., the risk of infection or mortality rates). They also do not advocate against such public health measures as physical distancing or wearing a mask in public. The greatest risk from this community might be threats to 5G cell phone towers, although actual attacks on such towers are rare.
IMG_6435.PNG
  • Like anti-vaccinators, the WG (White Genocide) community had an active exchange with detractors, to whom WG believers responded with a variety of argumentation styles. Conspiracists showed a mix of argument styles, such as hateful (‘Jews hate Christianity’), simplistic (‘brown people having more kids is white genocide!’), and insular or difficult to follow (‘preventing slavery = white genocide’). Detractors expressed frustration (‘what is wrong with you?!’), reasoned (‘you can’t argue in good faith with WG’), or identified humor (‘you realize that’s a joke, right?’) in their responses. A small amount of public virtue speech present showed that conversational niceties (‘take a look at this,’ ‘good one, thanks bro’) were also exchanged in this otherwise heated conversation. Overall, the exchange of comments between WG believers and deniers seemed much more substantive and engaged than the one-sided comments typical in the anti-vaccination group. This willingness to argue could mean that interventions using reasoned argument might be useful in opposing WG conspiracy theories. In all, the WG community was distinctive for its existential fear, high public vice speech, hate-based name-calling, and engaged dialogue. Given the finding from our literature review that it is possible to engage moderate subgroups within conspiracy-holding communities, there could be opportunities for engagement—the caveat to that being the deeply antisocial and strongly racist idea that “they” are a threat to “us” that forms the foundation of WG conspiracies. Many of the documents richest in concrete properties and personal roles were about ‘white women’ with ‘black men.’ WG conspiracists worried about white women going to Africa and having sex with African men, argued that ‘90% of white women that have babies with black men end up raising the child on their own,’ and complained about diversity media that show ‘a black man, with a white woman. You truly hate white people. This is white genocide.’ While this concern dovetails with WG conspiracists’ (perceived) existential fear of being racially erased, we note that the concern was solely around women—we did not see similar talk about ‘white men’ with ‘black women.
Then, they built an ML (Machine Learning) model that would detect a variety of conspiracy theories. They created a hybrid model that combined word embedding (semantic content) with linguistic stance (rhetorical dimensions). ML has already made great progress in recognizing the semantic content of text—for example, automatically detecting whether an article is about sports, hobbies, or world events. Word embeddings using a deep neural network (DNN) are an example of a powerful way to classify documents (one that accounts for words as they appear in context) and thus do a very good job of capturing the semantic meaning of documents.

"We conducted a mixed method of text analysis: statistical reports of stance features by conspiracy theory, followed by human reading of feature-rich samples. This kind of analysis combines machine distant reading for patterns in the data with human close-reading for meaning. To prevent harm and guard the privacy of those from whom we collected data, we do not use direct quotes. Instead, we paraphrase several quotes together to represent the language expressed by multiple users. These paraphrases appear in single quotes (‘’), and although multiple such paraphrases can appear in a specific example, the single quotes distinguish between different speakers and selections. Also, because this analysis featured human qualitative analysis at the level of individual posts, we were able to distinguish between concurring and dissenting perspectives in posts. For example, a response to a previous post supporting a given conspiracy theory might include a sarcastic rejoinder or insult, making it clear to a human reader that the response was on the same topic but opposed in perspective. Stance analysis is both quantitative (statistical frequencies and distributions of language categories) and qualitative (rich descriptions of attitudes and beliefs inferred from the language categories). In the next section, we provide details about our qualitative analysis of the statistical results."

They found that conspiracy beliefs are commonly held, and evidence suggests that more than one-in-four adults in North America believe in one or more conspiracies. Analysis of anti-vaccination social media content suggests that provaccinators routinely confront anti-vaccinators with condemnation, which led to an angry and fear-driven response on the part of anti-vaccinators. For example, Bessi, Caldarelli, et al. (2014) showed that exposure to debunking narratives that used a teasing tone led the most-polarized conspiracists to actually increase their subsequent interactions with unsubstantiated rumors. Such negative and unintended effects of persuasion campaigns are not uncommon and are referred to as a boomerang effect (Byrne and Hart, 2009).

A common thread among all the conspiracy groups was distrust of conventional authority figures. However, each group could point to its own in-group authorities as sources of inspiration and knowledge. Anti-vaccinators express distrust of medical authorities while highlighting opinions of sympathetic medical authorities, celebrities, and pundits. COVID-19 conspiracists distrust authority and mainstream media news, but they will still highlight material from agreeable medical authorities. Even the WG group made selective use of authority figures. This analysis suggests that intervention efforts need to be careful in the use of authority figures to counter conspiracist groups.
210519111049-barack-obama-ufo-split-exlarge-169.jpg

Various conspiracist communities carry their own concerns that help drive and motivate their views. In this study, anti-vaccinators primarily focused on vaccine safety. In the data we analyzed, members of this group worried about the safety of vaccines and the accuracy and legitimacy of vaccine safety tests. These views are wrapped up in a broader concern for public safety in general and for children specifically. Engagement efforts that empathically address this community’s concerns about vaccine safety might mitigate the group’s harm to public health.
cb6bf7bbf49ccf6ee97d6f6355d278c0d301a5ed437b0ee92d64543d9df52f24.jpg

WG believers articulate a perceived existential fear that the white race is facing an existential threat from a variety of ethnic groups that conspiracists describe as black and brown. We also note a focus on the control of women’s bodies—the idea of white women having sex with nonwhite men is another existential fear. Although these fears are deeply held, WG adherents represented in our data were willing to engage with detractors; thus, it might be possible to open dialogue and engage them.
IMG_6422.PNG

Policy Recommendations for Mitigating the Spread of and Harm from Conspiracy Theories
  1. Transparent and Empathetic Engagement with Conspiracists The open nature of the social media offers numerous opportunities to engage with conspiracy theorists. These engagements should not aggravate or provoke conspiracy theory adherents. Instead of confrontation, it might be more effective to engage with conspiracists in a transparent and sensitive manner. Public health communicators recommend engagements that communicate in an open and evidence-informed way that create safe spaces to encourage dialogue, foster community partnerships, and counter misinformation with care. In particular, validating the emotional concerns of participants could encourage productive dialogue. An additional technique beyond flagging specific conspiracy content is facilitated dialogue, which is when a third party facilitates communication, either in person or separated, between conflict parties (Froude and Zanchelli, 2017).This approach might help in communication between authoritative communities (such as doctors or government leaders) and conspiracy communities. Facilitated dialogues could also be carried out at lower levels in the form of facilitated discussions that help acknowledge fears and address feelings of existential threat for the participants.
  2. Correcting Conspiracy-Related False News One possible intervention that public health practitioners could consider is to correct instances of misinformation using such tools as realtime corrections, crowdsourced fact-checking, and algorithmic tagging. In populations that hold preexisting conspiratorial views, the evidence for the effectiveness of corrections is mixed, but results are consistently positive in studies investigating corrections of health-related misinformation in general populations. Overall, the weight of the evidence appears in favor of such corrections. In addition, efforts to correct misperceptions in conspiracyprone populations also should follow the advice of public health practitioners and do so in a manner that is transparent and sensitive to the concerns of pro-conspiracy audiences.
  3. Engagement with Moderate Members of Conspiracy Groups Conspiracists have their own experts on whom they lean to support and strengthen their views, and their reliance on these experts could limit the impact of formal outreach by public health professionals. Our review of the literature shows that one alternative might be to target outreach to moderate members of such groups who could, in turn, exert influence on the broader community. Commercial marketing programs use a similar approach when they engage social media influencers or “brand ambassadors” who then credibly communicate advantages of a commercial brand to their own audiences on social media.1 This approach is supported by academic research suggesting that people are more influenced by their social circles than by mass communication (Guidry et al., 2015). It might be possible, for example, to convey key messages to those who are only vaccine hesitant; these individuals might, in turn, relay such messages to those in anti-vaccination social media channels.2 Moderates who could influence WG members might be religious or political leaders or political pundits.
  4. Addressing of Fears and Existential Threats Underlying fears in the anti-vaccination and WG groups appear to be powerfully motivators for these groups. For anti-vaccination advocates, the fear rests on concerns about vaccine safety; for WG, that fear rests on a belief in the (perceived) existential threat to the white race. To the extent that interventions can address such fears, they might be able to limit the potential societal harms caused by both groups. Efforts that target those who are vaccine hesitant, for example, could address concerns by highlighting research on vaccine safety, the rigorous methods used in vaccine safety trials, or the alternative dangers that await those who are not vaccinated. Given that some WG conspiracists are willing to engage in rational debate and that successful persuasion requires Influencer engagement programs have also been recommended as a strategy to counter violent extremism (Helmus and Bodine-Baron, 2017). Some have not yet decided to commit to the anti-vaccine cause; others opt for some but not all vaccines; and still others prefer administering vaccines in a more gradual schedule than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends. Detecting Conspiracy Theories on Social Media using the intended audience’s values rather than the speaker’s values (Marcellino, 2015), it might be more persuasive and effective to address claims that minorities will annihilate whites than to attempt to promote themes of racial equality
Source: https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RRA600/RRA676-1/RAND_RRA676-1.pdf

TL;DR: The RAND institute decided to teach social media another way of controlling their users. With specifically conspiracy theorists, the usual methods of blocking and word-censoring don't work. Dividing and conquering by normalizing the conspiracy (Wuhan Lab Leak Hypothesis, and UFOs) or by uplifting Judas Goats within the more serious/dangerous conspiracy theorists and using them to moderate their flocks. This has already begun, since Jan 2021. So, UFOs.. Are they real? Are they Jew-FOs?
 
Last edited:

Haim Arlosoroff

Archpolitician June Lapercal
kiwifarms.net
1. Convince conspiracy nuts that they're right, the conspiracy was real all along
2. Convince normal people that the conspiracy nuts are right, the conspiracy was real all along.
3. ???
4. Profit

Am I getting this right?
  1. Use UFOs as a guide to learn how to fuck with conspiratards and detractors of the World Economic Forum alike
  2. Hire Obama and literally whoever to become the face of UFO enthusiasts
  3. ???
  4. Obama becomes King of the UFO nerds
  5. ???
  6. White Nationalism is a thing of the past
Reading that 108 page study was a ride! Its that they're trying to stop conspiracies online, so they're experimenting with UFO guys to see how to fuck with them. Then they'll use that on the other conspiracy theorists, and twitter will be more advertiser friendly. Its a fucking wild study. Mostly its going to end up with more censorship but UFO shit is going to keep getting real famous until they figure out how to talk to conspiracy theorists. Then UFO talk will disappear again, there is no there there. No real disclosures apparently according to the study. RAND is just fucking with the UFO community to figure out how to manipulate conspiracy theorists. The fact that Obama is discussing UFOs is just the icing on the cake.

that's a lot of words that i'm probably not going to read.

but that bobby hill picture was funny.
But I put an TL;DR on the bottom and everything! oh fiddlesticks..
images.jpg
 

TenMilesWide

It's a communist plot!
kiwifarms.net
  1. Use UFOs as a guide to learn how to fuck with conspiratards and detractors of the World Economic Forum alike
  2. Hire Obama and literally whoever to become the face of UFO enthusiasts
  3. ???
  4. Obama becomes King of the UFO nerds
  5. ???
  6. White Nationalism is a thing of the past
Reading that 108 page study was a ride! Its that they're trying to stop conspiracies online, so they're experimenting with UFO guys to see how to fuck with them. Then they'll use that on the other conspiracy theorists, and twitter will be more advertiser friendly. Its a fucking wild study. Mostly its going to end up with more censorship but UFO shit is going to keep getting real famous until they figure out how to talk to conspiracy theorists. Then UFO talk will disappear again, there is no there there. No real disclosures apparently according to the study. RAND is just fucking with the UFO community to figure out how to manipulate conspiracy theorists. The fact that Obama is discussing UFOs is just the icing on the cake.
I hope they spend multiple years & millions of dollars on this endeavor only to find that there's no way to communicate with schizoposters that doesn't involve them taking their meds.
 

HymanHive

kiwifarms.net
I'm a big old school conspiracy theorist (none of this political shit) but after r/conspiracy was turned in to The_Donald-lite, I believe all modern day conspiracy theories are just bullshit.

While I believe there is more to our past than we know/are being told, All UFO sightings since WW2 have been advanced military tech and this has come out time and time again.

The latest raft of UFO sightings pulling impossible maneuvers, is a load of shit. They're advanced drones using cutting edge engine tech.

Anyway, to the topic; conspiracy theories becoming 'true' (they're not conspiracy theories they're just the truth that the MSM manipulate to look false before back-flipping) is just a way to sow more disharmony in people.

For proof, look at the cult buzzwords each side and group use and what is combined together. Homophobic misogynist is one, alt-right white supremacist is another. Alt-right conspiracy theorist is one used a fair amount, which is trying to link the evil alt right with the conspiracy theorists who question (don't believe anything) the media.

To that end, Flat Earth is used as a brush with which to tar conspiracy theorists as retards.
 

Old Sun World

kiwifarms.net
Viruses don't exist like they say they do. There is no covid19. Viruses can only spread in controlled conditions that allow the bio engineered nanobots to be in statis, other viruses only activate in contact with human blood. All viruses are man made.
 

Haim Arlosoroff

Archpolitician June Lapercal
kiwifarms.net
i didn't make it that far
My dream is that one day you will, only to find a "Too Long; Didn't Read" staring you right in the face. Mocking you.

While I believe there is more to our past than we know/are being told, All UFO sightings since WW2 have been advanced military tech and this has come out time and time again.

The latest raft of UFO sightings pulling impossible maneuvers, is a load of shit. They're advanced drones using cutting edge engine tech.
One question.

If there are a group of monkey men, McNamara's Morons, handed trillion dollar camera with the promise of post space-age perfection which America's equipment, cutting edge though it may be, hardly is. Perfection is always infinitely far, and we always push tech to their breaking points after all. If they are put into a plane with a fancy triangular aperture cameras for instance, and only they see triangle UFOs. They don't always see triangle UFOs, but no one else ever does except them.
apertures.jpg
What percentage, in your heart, do you think the Military Camera UFOs alone are the result of Cameraman error? 0%, 50%, 75%, 99.999%? A machine learning AI sprucing up a video still taken at extreme digital zoom and focused wrong looks an awful lot like these UFOs that are in the recent reports.

Mind you, I happen to believe in alien visitation as well. I think it was vastly older, and that we likely failed some test or threshold, and are being isolated until we mature past our false orderings of social and culture which don't last. Kingdoms are foolish because they are bad at making wealth, and in poverty all men are equal belying the system of hierarchy. However Republics are foolish because they are good at making wealth, and in a gilded age all men are at their least equal belying the system of political equality. We might alternatively resemble their parasites and disgust them. Maybe we resemble their pets? Maybe an AI took over and altered them until their culture and civilization resembled nothing like a natural one except maybe an anthill? Maybe like the dinosaurs they see us as another failure to stabilize and grow past a single planet? Bugs might interest them more? The collective biomass of bugs is larger than our human mass, and maybe that was a danger in the Alien's past which would sour their outlook on us? Too many questions, not enough data.

I just don't think the current UFO stuff is the real deal, RAND is playing you for a fool to figure you out. All merely for political gain.

For proof, look at the cult buzzwords each side and group use and what is combined together. Homophobic misogynist is one, alt-right white supremacist is another. Alt-right conspiracy theorist is one used a fair amount, which is trying to link the evil alt right with the conspiracy theorists who question (don't believe anything) the media.

To that end, Flat Earth is used as a brush with which to tar conspiracy theorists as retards.
r/conspiracy became political, and as all the journalists, academics, and hollywood men vote one way then r/conspiracy became a parody of the opposite side to them. r/The_Donald in all the ways which annoy but not in the ways which r/The_Donald would recognize. So nobody's happy, nobody.

Flat earth is fascinating for its stickiness while being largely about the ice wall which not only keeps the water in but also redirects all the flights and shipping somehow? I can't see the world from the Flat Earthers POV. It must be very magical how Manchuria, ROC, PRC, Nazi Germany, and the Rothschilds worked with their enemies lest the public find out! It never even occurs to these people to ask these questions. Mind you Tartaria and the Mud Flood seems the same to me, too many cooks working seamlessly together through revolutions and total wars.

conspiracists are a necessary part of a proper civilization, they force elites to actually offer complete explanations for their works lest the public side with a more honest force and overthrown them. Society without that component becomes top-heavy and fragile.

I ain't reading all of that, but gg, looks like some good ol' schizoposting.
Its a summary of a government think-tank (RAND Corporation)'s policy paper for Google in how to censor the internet yet more. So, yes. But also no. But then finally yes once more.
 

melty

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Well, I think this is pretty interesting even though I don't quite agree with your conclusions. I didn't really see anything in the paper about addressing the UFO and covid origin theories, probably because they concluded that weren't that harmful. But I guess they could have left the recommendations there, but then why make this public at all?
One thing that stood out to me is this:
Screenshot_20210607-205706__01.jpg

Seems like an easy thing to observe them doing or not doing to see if the paper's recommendations are actually taken.
 

Haim Arlosoroff

Archpolitician June Lapercal
kiwifarms.net
Seems like an easy thing to observe them doing or not doing to see if the paper's recommendations are actually taken.
Yes, it would shock me if they shifted from "racism is the original sin of whites but I'm not like the other whites, I'm one of the good ones" back to the 1960's star trek "once we're over our prejudges, there is a universe to explore" which Ironically shifted even in New Trek.

Overall, I believe very thoroughly that those of our 2020s socioeconomic classes (middle and downward) were not supposed to read the notes and recommendations the think-tank class (lower-upper / upper-middle) made for the ruling elites. We're supposed to be suitably shocked and excited by their efforts at acknowledging our existences. Hence the UFO excitement by the common masses which confused the hell out of me. All a magic trick, but I worry about Google's response since they are a banhammer looking for another way to automatically ban. Maybe the Jigsaw Unit at google are a different branch?

I didn't really see anything in the paper about addressing the UFO and covid origin theories, probably because they concluded that weren't that harmful.
Fostering safe spaces to encourage dialogue, foster community partnerships, and counter misinformation with care seem to be the only way they are confronting UFO groups, likely too many people are UFO interested in positions of power. Obama and journalists gushing about UFOs might not all be in on the Joke? Hillary Clinton, darling of these circles, was/is a UFO watcher, and its been crickets from her since she probably got the memo on how fake and gay this round of UFO talk was. She hates the Obamas though, so it would make sense she would set them up to look stupid in Washington circles as well.

As to the COVID theory?
How nutty were they.png

I think the largest issue with their model is that 55% of the COVID talk isolated was Non-conspiracy but also 30% was thought to be conspiracy when they actually were Non-conspiratorial using Google's BERT contextualizer which was trained on Wikipedia primarily, and 20% went the opposite way when they used the in-house RAND-Lex contextualizer and were falsely thought to be good-boy thoughts when they were double-plus ungood socializations. I find their control group 'normal' very interesting because it shows that the best they can hope for is 10% of the time good people are going to be put into the bad pile. And of course, that would be fine for you and I. But this is a sign that they (the good boy washington types) might be punished, and they're too important you see. So very likely they are frightened to implement this system for their own sakes.

Furthermore, stance only made talking about niggers on kiwifarms something which is allowed because google's BERT alone blocks more good boys than bad. Once stance gets better and the "2/3rds flagged are the bad people" grows to 90-95% rather than BERT + STANCEs 29% of the 15% false positives + the 29% real positives Predicted Conspiracy or 29/44 or 2/3. Likely Null is going to have a bad time once they get those numbers up, google's going to come after him. Fortunately they used Twitter posts, maybe he'll be fine forever? Likely out of the blue, one day bam!

I wonder if the COVID vaccine was a way to make us more viable breeding stock for aliems.
Hollywood, of course, made a story about that. Although it was also about using 'healing centers' to control humanity into compliance. How could we ever be convinced by disease and suffering into fitful compliance?

Well, I think this is pretty interesting even though I don't quite agree with your conclusions.
Well, if you know why Google's Jigsaw Unit would fund this. Other than to fuck Null out of the blue a year or two from now, and praise UFO groups today desperately trying to generate a model that moderates communities' different views into conformity since the Machine Learning omni-tool of their's failed. I am all ears.
 
Last edited:

HymanHive

kiwifarms.net
One question.

If there are a group of monkey men, McNamara's Morons, handed trillion dollar camera with the promise of post space-age perfection which America's equipment, cutting edge though it may be, hardly is. Perfection is always infinitely far, and we always push tech to their breaking points after all. If they are put into a plane with a fancy triangular aperture cameras for instance, and only they see triangle UFOs. They don't always see triangle UFOs, but no one else ever does except them.
What percentage, in your heart, do you think the Military Camera UFOs alone are the result of Cameraman error? 0%, 50%, 75%, 99.999%? A machine learning AI sprucing up a video still taken at extreme digital zoom and focused wrong looks an awful lot like these UFOs that are in the recent reports.

Probably a fair amount, i wouldn't guess at a percentage because i've never really thought about it in that light.
Mind you, I happen to believe in alien visitation as well. I think it was vastly older, and that we likely failed some test or threshold, and are being isolated until we mature past our false orderings of social and culture which don't last. Kingdoms are foolish because they are bad at making wealth, and in poverty all men are equal belying the system of hierarchy. However Republics are foolish because they are good at making wealth, and in a gilded age all men are at their least equal belying the system of political equality. We might alternatively resemble their parasites and disgust them. Maybe we resemble their pets? Maybe an AI took over and altered them until their culture and civilization resembled nothing like a natural one except maybe an anthill? Maybe like the dinosaurs they see us as another failure to stabilize and grow past a single planet? Bugs might interest them more? The collective biomass of bugs is larger than our human mass, and maybe that was a danger in the Alien's past which would sour their outlook on us? Too many questions, not enough data.
All of that is looking through the scope of the human conscious mind. That brain has evolved on Earth, from Primates. We cannot know for sure if a brain evolved in a different environment acts and thinks differently. Our motives for 'their' existence and visitations are purely Earth-bound human. Maybe in 'their' mind, there is no study, only conquest. Maybe there is no conquest, only assistance.

I just don't think the current UFO stuff is the real deal, RAND is playing you for a fool to figure you out. All merely for political gain.
I agree
r/conspiracy became political, and as all the journalists, academics, and hollywood men vote one way then r/conspiracy became a parody of the opposite side to them. r/The_Donald in all the ways which annoy but not in the ways which r/The_Donald would recognize. So nobody's happy, nobody.
I agree, it was a real shame that it got invaded. Though i believe it was intentional. A lot of the community, from the very early days of the invasion, complained that r/conspiracy was moving away from the real old conspiracies. Some of the articles posted on there pre-invasion were very interesting from a 'what if' scientific view-point. I would go as far as saying that r/conspiracy was going to get co-opted or shut-down either way.
Flat earth is fascinating for its stickiness while being largely about the ice wall which not only keeps the water in but also redirects all the flights and shipping somehow? I can't see the world from the Flat Earthers POV. It must be very magical how Manchuria, ROC, PRC, Nazi Germany, and the Rothschilds worked with their enemies lest the public find out! It never even occurs to these people to ask these questions. Mind you Tartaria and the Mud Flood seems the same to me, too many cooks working seamlessly together through revolutions and total wars.
FE can be disproved in so many ways that it's not even funny. How it ever caught on is beyond me. At least with some of the 9/11 or moon-landing theories, you can look and think "That sounds far-fetched, but it isn't outside the realm of possibility". Whereas the FE theory makes me think "no" to everything.

conspiracists are a necessary part of a proper civilization, they force elites to actually offer complete explanations for their works lest the public side with a more honest force and overthrown them. Society without that component becomes top-heavy and fragile.
Interesting POV
 

You Bastard Guy

Back off, jackoff!
kiwifarms.net
“Somewhere a government think-tank is dreaming up new ways to use and abuse the citizenry, while simultaneously figuring out the most cost-effective way to keep them from rioting.”

I can’t remember where I read that, but it always comes to mind when I read stuff like this.
 

Piggy Pot Pie

the girl with lymphedema goes waddling
kiwifarms.net
alien-threat-from-another-planet-ronald-reagan-speaking-at-the-un-general-assembly-sept-21-1987.jpg
“I occasionally think how quickly our differences worldwide would vanish if we were facing an alien threat from outside this world. And yet, I ask you, is not an alien force already among us? What could be more alien to the universal aspirations of our peoples than war and the threat of war?”
-Ronald Reagan, former Hollywood actor
Aliens.jpg
Project Blue Beam coming in nicely

For nearly a century, the mass media has conditioned the masses for an "alien invasion". Covid panic seemed like a test run of how the heard will handle aliens. I remember years ago reading about how some particulates in chemtrails made a screen where on massive images could be projected. I think they tested it with an image of Jesus which is total blasphemy- a favorite theme of Hollywood.

The "aliens" that "invade" will no doubt carry many scary space diseases that only vaccines will be able to cure. The pharmaceutical industry will profit handsomely while people will wonder, "I wonder how I got cancer hurr durr? Time for my booster shot!"
Rocket man.jpg
Psalm 19:1
The heavens declare the glory of God; And the firmament sheweth his handywork.
Space is fake and gay. Happy pride month. :optimistic:
 
Top