Social Justice Lit -

MarvinTheParanoidAndroid

This will all end in tears, I just know it.
True & Honest Fan
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Oh, @LetterlandMafia, since you brought her up: Did you know Louise O'Neill put out one of those Post-Steubenville Rape books I mentioned?

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She also did a feminist reimagining of The Little Mermaid, because of course she did.


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One of my least favorite trends, YA or otherwise, is reimagining popular myths/fairytales from a "feminist" perspective.

Just let me have Ariel acting like a realistic twit teenager making bad choices to spite daddy instead of your shallow, one-note, GURL POWER! icon. What is it with feminists trying to pretend that girls aren't capable of being stupid or making bad choices (or blaming said stupidity or bad choices on the patriarchy)?
The first book sounds like the writer just bit off of the Highschool football player rape incident that happened a few years ago.
 
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QuokkaCaptain

The happiest of all the marsupials
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i've noticed even the non-PC novels are getting careful about describing their characters. like, does this person have red hair or what? can't you fucking tell us? you are a WRITER.

at first i thought it was to make these novels easily marketable for Hollywood. if you don't describe the character's appearance in depth, it means Will Smith or Zoe Saldana or whoever can play them. but even the lesser interchangeable characters are getting this treatment now.

its like they are afraid to assign the main characters an ethnic/religious background *of any kind*. since you'd then have to say :something: about it, & that's where trouble is.

excuse me but if its like that, why should i care about your characters? if you hold back information about them, why would we give a shit?

they are ruining fiction with this endless sjw bullshit.

good thread & thanks for starting it @QuokkaCaptain
Thank you!

Something else I've noticed in several novels (Adult, YA, kids, all across the board) is that if a character is described as being not-white, you'll almost certainly get (at the bare minimum) a quick blurb about racism/bigotry/prejudice somewhere in the text. I've noticed it more and more as these past few years have gone by, probably because authors are either being pressured to virtue-signal, or because they've realized it's a good way to get a pat on the back.

Like, I started reading this one book recently (Not If I Can Help It, it's a middle-grade book). It's about a girl with sensory processing disorder who doesn't handle change well. Her parents are divorced, and her dad is planning to marry her best friend's mom. That's the plot in a nutshell.

Well, they introduce the best friend, and imply she's not white; they introduce the mom, confirm that the mom is Indian, and then almost immediately afterwards says something to the effect of "Oh, [Best Friend's Mom] would get asked about where she was really from, which is silly! Just because her skin's brown doesn't mean she's not American!" This is literally within the first twenty or so pages. We genuinely, whole-fucking-heartedly, did not need to know this. That's as far as I've gotten thus far, so I can't comment on the rest of the book and its politics, but that bit was just blatant virtue-signaling.

Then there's the latest Natasha Preston book (The Twin) which overall wasn't social justice-y at all, but one of the main character's friends is black and there's, like, a paragraph dedicated to gushing over her "natural hair" and some low-key shit about racism.

Another book, Good Neighbors- it's about a group of neighbors, most of them upper-middle class white people; one lady in the group is Puerto Rican, and of course she's the woke one in the group (who incidentally thinks she's better than everyone else because she's not white). Damn near every single appearance she has in the book ends up becoming a Discussion on Racism, even though the book really isn't fucking about it!

Authors in particular don't seem to be able to resist the urge to drop in that little bit of bite-sized virtue-signaling nowadays to show their audience that even if their book is about White People, they're still woke! Don't worry, and also please don't boycott me for writing a book with a white lead! I'd get it if the book's actual subject was about racism, but the ones I've seen this in aren't.

This is why so many "woke, diverse, representative!" books/media are failing. It's becoming Pavlovian: If there's a non-white character, we will at some point be getting lectured about racism. If the main characters are girls, we will at some point be getting lectured about misogyny/sexism. If there's a gay kid, we'll be talking about homophobia at some point. People may not talk about it because it's not politically correct, but at the end of the day they're noticing the trend and they're getting tired of it.
 

LetterlandMafia

Foreclose on me one more time
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Thank you!

Something else I've noticed in several novels (Adult, YA, kids, all across the board) is that if a character is described as being not-white, you'll almost certainly get (at the bare minimum) a quick blurb about racism/bigotry/prejudice somewhere in the text. I've noticed it more and more as these past few years have gone by, probably because authors are either being pressured to virtue-signal, or because they've realized it's a good way to get a pat on the back.

Like, I started reading this one book recently (Not If I Can Help It, it's a middle-grade book). It's about a girl with sensory processing disorder who doesn't handle change well. Her parents are divorced, and her dad is planning to marry her best friend's mom. That's the plot in a nutshell.

Well, they introduce the best friend, and imply she's not white; they introduce the mom, confirm that the mom is Indian, and then almost immediately afterwards says something to the effect of "Oh, [Best Friend's Mom] would get asked about where she was really from, which is silly! Just because her skin's brown doesn't mean she's not American!" This is literally within the first twenty or so pages. We genuinely, whole-fucking-heartedly, did not need to know this. That's as far as I've gotten thus far, so I can't comment on the rest of the book and its politics, but that bit was just blatant virtue-signaling.

Then there's the latest Natasha Preston book (The Twin) which overall wasn't social justice-y at all, but one of the main character's friends is black and there's, like, a paragraph dedicated to gushing over her "natural hair" and some low-key shit about racism.

Another book, Good Neighbors- it's about a group of neighbors, most of them upper-middle class white people; one lady in the group is Puerto Rican, and of course she's the woke one in the group (who incidentally thinks she's better than everyone else because she's not white). Damn near every single appearance she has in the book ends up becoming a Discussion on Racism, even though the book really isn't fucking about it!

Authors in particular don't seem to be able to resist the urge to drop in that little bit of bite-sized virtue-signaling nowadays to show their audience that even if their book is about White People, they're still woke! Don't worry, and also please don't boycott me for writing a book with a white lead! I'd get it if the book's actual subject was about racism, but the ones I've seen this in aren't.

This is why so many "woke, diverse, representative!" books/media are failing. It's becoming Pavlovian: If there's a non-white character, we will at some point be getting lectured about racism. If the main characters are girls, we will at some point be getting lectured about misogyny/sexism. If there's a gay kid, we'll be talking about homophobia at some point. People may not talk about it because it's not politically correct, but at the end of the day they're noticing the trend and they're getting tired of it.
I also wonder if agents/publishers have a role in this - in one of my copies of the Writers and Artists Yearbook they interviewed the owner of a children’s publishing house and she mentions how she made an author change their character from white to black to suit their personal diversity fantasy. Not denying there’s a growing number of SJW authors, just saying that the rot likely goes all the way down.
 

Dom Cruise

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Yep, that's the one. Damn, that 2012, how time flies.
I've never even heard of that case but it's disturbing how almost all this bullshit started in 2012.

The Travyon Martin shooting was the start of America's modern race relations, Anita Sarkeesian was Patient Zero for feminist "professional victims" and I guess Steubenville really supercharged talk of "rape culture"

In a way the Mayans were right, the world as we knew it really did end in 2012.
 

TalmudSperg

New Zealander & Agriculturalist
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Oh, yay. Woko Haram is celebrating the removal of Homer and Vergil from the "required reading" for CLASSIC LITERATURE.
And pay special attention to where this piece of shit admits to being a classics professor.
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Did some Twitter tard actually call for the removal of Vergil from classics classes?

Vergil is from the "Debil may Cum" series, while Virgil wrote the Aeneid for his patron Augustus.
 
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Wonderful Id

kiwifarms.net
I've never even heard of that case but it's disturbing how almost all this bullshit started in 2012.

The Travyon Martin shooting was the start of America's modern race relations, Anita Sarkeesian was Patient Zero for feminist "professional victims" and I guess Steubenville really supercharged talk of "rape culture"

In a way the Mayans were right, the world as we knew it really did end in 2012.
I am so glad that I don't have to grow up in this world we've created. Must be so confusing for those who are still trying to figure things out and wade through all the bullshit.
 

QuokkaCaptain

The happiest of all the marsupials
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I also wonder if agents/publishers have a role in this - in one of my copies of the Writers and Artists Yearbook they interviewed the owner of a children’s publishing house and she mentions how she made an author change their character from white to black to suit their personal diversity fantasy. Not denying there’s a growing number of SJW authors, just saying that the rot likely goes all the way down.
Oh, it would not shock me.

At the absolute least, these publishing houses/agents are running interference to make sure their pet authors don't cross any big red lines. Especially in the YA and Scifi/Fantasy arenas, I strongly suspect there are authors that are getting pressured to add "diverse" characters to their roster- or at the very least, are being encouraged to practice RightThink (like those godawful Sensitivity Readers) in their books.
 

Piga Dgrifm

Pita Griffin
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It makes sense in a lot of stories to include mentions of racism or homophobia (If the openly gay character living in the Bible Belt has never been bullied over it, that's pretty unrealistic), but if you stop the story to explain how a minor side-character got asked where she was from once and how that was bad and racist, then you're just shoehorning it in so you can pat yourself on the back for being so accepting. Ask yourself if this is relevant to the story and if it tells us anything about the characters that we need to know, if the answer is no, you're just virtue signaling for the sake of virtue signaling.
 

Krokodil Overdose

[|][||][||][|_]
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It makes sense in a lot of stories to include mentions of racism or homophobia (If the openly gay character living in the Bible Belt has never been bullied over it, that's pretty unrealistic), but if you stop the story to explain how a minor side-character got asked where she was from once and how that was bad and racist, then you're just shoehorning it in so you can pat yourself on the back for being so accepting. Ask yourself if this is relevant to the story and if it tells us anything about the characters that we need to know, if the answer is no, you're just virtue signaling for the sake of virtue signaling.
Well, that, and muh rayciss/muh sore giney/muh homophobia is a plot point that's been so fucking done that it makes zombies look fresh and original by comparison. Like World War 2, or sci-fi "what is man? What is machine?" navel-gazing, there's nothing new, original, or insightful that can be said about it.

She also did a feminist reimagining of The Little Mermaid, because of course she did.


View attachment 1246430

One of my least favorite trends, YA or otherwise, is reimagining popular myths/fairytales from a "feminist" perspective.

Just let me have Ariel acting like a realistic twit teenager making bad choices to spite daddy instead of your shallow, one-note, GURL POWER! icon. What is it with feminists trying to pretend that girls aren't capable of being stupid or making bad choices (or blaming said stupidity or bad choices on the patriarchy)?
I was morbidly interested in this, so I popped open the "Look Inside" thing that Amazon offers. There's something like eighty fucking pages to the preview (they do that thing where they cut out some pages from the middle, something I've never seen outside trash-tier) and I'm not going to read the whole thing, but here's what jumped out at me in what I did read.
-It's written in first-person present tense, with tons of MEMEMEMEME emoting.
-"Gaia" was the tip of the uncreative iceberg. "Grandmother Thalassa," who calls the protagonist "Murigan," and her sisters Talia and Cosima.
-Weird continuity problems to facilitate whining. She's constantly complaining about being told that she's "not ready" to go to the surface and asking to know when she will be, only for the answer to be "on her 15th birthday," which is apparently an established tradition here. Shouldn't she have known this?
-Her mother was apparently killed by humans. I'm laying 3:1 that it was ACKSHULLY dad.
-In the subset of "SJWs don't human very well," Gaia displays no emotional attachment to her sisters, treating them like retarded cousins that she has to put up with at a family gathering.

This was all in the first five or so pages. I might revisit it if I feel masochistic, but don't count on it. Really, I can't describe this better than Moe Lane already did: "a narrow and stylized form of political pornography."
 

Piga Dgrifm

Pita Griffin
True & Honest Fan
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Y'know, something I've been thinking about; why is it that these so-called "feminist retellings" have the female characters being abused, mistreated, being portrayed as weak or lesser than men... Just, generally treat them so much worse than they were in the original? Much worse than how real women are treated in first world countries? How is that "feminist" in any way, shape, or form?
 

Namesarehardtocomeupwith

Boomer Pirate
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Y'know, something I've been thinking about; why is it that these so-called "feminist retellings" have the female characters being abused, mistreated, being portrayed as weak or lesser than men... Just, generally treat them so much worse than they were in the original? Much worse than how real women are treated in first world countries? How is that "feminist" in any way, shape, or form?
Their life had been so privilege they can not imagine and comprehend any problem a modern woman could potentially face so they took it upon themselves to invent some. At this point the world 'feminist' probably mean overcoming the evil man in their head.
 

QuokkaCaptain

The happiest of all the marsupials
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Y'know, something I've been thinking about; why is it that these so-called "feminist retellings" have the female characters being abused, mistreated, being portrayed as weak or lesser than men... Just, generally treat them so much worse than they were in the original? Much worse than how real women are treated in first world countries? How is that "feminist" in any way, shape, or form?
Because stories like The Little Mermaid are beloved, classic tales, and we're all too dumb to see how misogynistic they are.

By the feminist metric, Ariel losing her voice to get a man, and being told "no" by daddy in the movie is misogynistic. Even reasonably overprotective fathers are often seen as misogynistic by feminists because they're trying to "control" their daughters (well no shit, parents are supposed to control their teenagers, it's kinda their fucking jobs). And a woman sacrificing anything for a man is enough to send most feminists into the fucking vapors, because women should never give anything up for men (meanwhile, Max from Life is Strange should totally sacrifice an entire town of people for Chloe because lesbians).

But here's the thing: Bitching about Disney princesses is literally Baby's First Feminism. To them, the misogyny is super-obvious (because they're hypersensitive to it), and they're disgusted that the rest of us (especially- gasp- LITTLE GIRLS!) don't agree, and continue to watch and promote the movie. So when they write a re-telling of the Little Mermaid, or Beauty and the Beast, or Cinderella, they really blow up the misogynistic aspects because if they don't, we won't get it. They make Triton into an actual patriarchal tyrant, and- I haven't read the book, but this is an educated guess- they probably made Eric an asshole too, just to drive home the message that "men are trash and you should never, ever sacrifice anything for them".

You know, because we're morons.

It's also worth mentioning that the "women are warriors" shit doesn't really have much meaning unless they set up an enemy worth warring against. And that means that in a lot of "feminist" stories, it means making men into misogynistic rapists who spend all their free time to coming up with new ways to oppress women.
 

TaimuRadiu

Kaiserin
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Y'know, something I've been thinking about; why is it that these so-called "feminist retellings" have the female characters being abused, mistreated, being portrayed as weak or lesser than men... Just, generally treat them so much worse than they were in the original? Much worse than how real women are treated in first world countries? How is that "feminist" in any way, shape, or form?
That wasn't the plot of The Little Mermaid. The plot involved her having agony every time she walked on her feet.

Rate me late on this or whatever. The rest of this thread makes me as mad as at someone who refuses to read the original Grimm.
 

Piga Dgrifm

Pita Griffin
True & Honest Fan
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Cross-posting from the YA book thread:
Alex Gino's latest book is out now, and it's bad. You can read a bit of it here:

It's about an asexual ten year old, even though "asexual" is the default at that age since you probably haven't hit puberty yet. Scenes taking place in the school's LGBT club read like something out of a pamphlet with stilted, bad dialogue that doesn't sound anything like how kids (or anyone else) talk. Like his other two, this seems more like an informative packet and less like a book.



Here's my favorite review thus far:
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Doctor Placebo

Soleimani's back. Tell a friend.
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Did some Twitter tard actually call for the removal of Vergil from classics classes?

Vergil is from the "Debil may Cum" series, while Virgil wrote the Aeneid for his patron Augustus.
You know they're throwing shit at everything to see what sticks when they can't fucking spell the name right of the historical writer they're trying to cancel. That's a really good faith attack, right there.
 
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Someone in a Tree

It's the ripple, not the sea that is happening
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I've been seeing a book called "White Fragility" get advertised everywhere lately. Here's how the author thinks white and black people should interact:
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Jesse Singal, who has been writing about the cancel culture that is plaguing the YA community, hosts a podcast that recently covered this book, the popularity of which is pretty alarming. In the discussion, Singal and his cohost wonder who the audience for this book is since it’s most likely being purchased by white progressives who never stop thinking about race, so it’s not like it’s going to convert a white supremacist. And the author seems to be under the impression that if people are openly critical of her work, that’s just evidence that it works, which is a logical fallacy if there ever was one.
 
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