Social Justice Lit

Yaoi Huntress Earth

My avatar is problematic.
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Joined
Jul 12, 2014
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Y'know, something I've been thinking about; why is it that these so-called "feminist retellings" have the female characters being abused, mistreated, being portrayed as weak or lesser than men... Just, generally treat them so much worse than they were in the original? Much worse than how real women are treated in first world countries? How is that "feminist" in any way, shape, or form?
It makes me wonder what they'd think of the original TLM story which had strong religious themes. Where the mermaid wanted to earn a soul as well as get the guy. Not to mention the ending is a bit up in air since she may or may not have earned the happy afterlife she wanted.
 

Dom Cruise

*Siiiiiiiiiip*
True & Honest Fan
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Jun 18, 2019
White Fragility is the biggest piece of bait to come out of academia in the current era. "White people ever getting upset about the way they're treated or talked about or talked to is white fragility. White people are all a bunch of pussies and any problems they have are invalid. Oh, you're arguing with me whitey? U mad? Thanks for proving my point. TROLOLOL." It's literally just a racist Kafka trap.

That fact that such pure fucking garbage got published in the first place is very worrying.
 

JambledUpWords

Stairs are my worst enemy
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Doctor Placebo

Bloody, bloody 2020.
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"Black queer American Muslim activist." C-c-c-combo! I'm sure all she had to do was flash that identity and the woke companies were all clamoring to hire her. It's even the first thing on her bio. Really making it clear. Hey Blair, why don't you try your queer Muslim activist schtick in the Middle East or North Africa? Surely those wonderful non-white supremacist places will welcome you with open arms.

Christina Dalcher is the author of Vox. Riding off dat sweet sweet "THE HANDMAID'S TALE IS RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER!" alarmism, the book's plot centers around a dystopian future where women are only allowed to speak 100 words a day.
Socjus book and show plots are turning into Adam Sandler/Rob Schneider/Jim Carrey movie plots, with all the jokes surgically removed with a rusty scalpel and replaced with miserable, self-aggrandizing lectures.
 

MarvinTheParanoidAndroid

This will all end in tears, I just know it.
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Feb 24, 2015
I think the thing I hate most about SJW media is the mutual exclusivity of it, it's never a story about a character who happens to be a woman, it's a woman who happens to be a character in a story, & in this story the female lead is always a victim & hero. White straight men are depicted as either soy cucks or criminal sociopaths. Bonus points if the woman happens to have superior physical strength to the man somehow.

It reminds me of how writers couldn't do a Wonder Woman TV show because "We don't know how to write women." Ripley is widely considered one of the best female leads in modern cinema history, and she was originally written as a man before being swapped for a woman in production, & nobody was any the wiser until it came out from behind the scenes. What we have today is just an extended version of "we don't know how to write women," but really it's just "we don't know how to write a character."
 

Harbinger of Kali Yuga

Because the world is SO BAD, like diet soda.
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Circe by Madeline Miller is sort of a feministic-retelling of the myth of Circe. There's one chapter that's a bit much, but all-in-all it's an example of when it's done right: when feminism is whimsical, fun, positive, and about strength. I recommend it.

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Troonologist PhD

YWNBARW
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Dec 21, 2019
Circe by Madeline Miller is sort of a feministic-retelling of the myth of Circe. There's one chapter that's a bit much, but all-in-all it's an example of when it's done right: when feminism is whimsical, fun, positive, and about strength. I recommend it.

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Why does this need a feminist retelling? Feminist spins on evil women are incredibly cliche. Circe turned Scylla into a monster because she was jealous, so didn't just hurt men. What would be a fresh take is portraying these characters as having bad shit happen to them in their past but still the villain because it doesn't justify their actions.
 

Harbinger of Kali Yuga

Because the world is SO BAD, like diet soda.
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Why does this need a feminist retelling? Feminist spins on evil women are incredibly cliche. What would be a fresh take is portraying them as having bad shit happen to them in their past but still the villain because it doesn't justify their actions.
Sorry, I'm stoned up the ass and couldn't edit my post to clarify anything and what I wrote was not really correct. I shouldn't have even posted that stoned. Good thing I wasn't on shrooms.

I should have specified it's basically modern retelling with giving character more depth and purpose but retaining the "sense" and style of faithful to what you expect out of Greek mythology but just with modern conventions and the like. The female characters have more depth and there is a bit of a feminist edge but it's not "feminist" in an explicit or narrow way. It's actually a pretty good story and worth a read. As I stated, one chapter really beats you over the head, but other than that it's a good read if you're sick of medieval fantasy (which I am).

I bring this up to distinguish against a lot of the OTHER books with any sort of leaning on these topics. The good ones are subtle, and get you to identify with their characters and their plausibly identifiable situations. The hamfistedly ideological books, that will be "SJW" always by virtue of what "SJW" refers to, will direct and order you how to feel, like any fanatic does (see: Ayn Rand). Then you have loosely "feminist" works and artists stemming from (from the top of my head, since I'm a fan) Siouxsie Sioux, PJ Harvey, authors like Madeline Miller, etc, creating something without an overattachment to labels, preaching, and social justice subculture-aligned troped and dogwhistles. The cultists and the lesser minds tend to lack any subtlety and nuance in their storytelling, and always tend up having absolutely nothing profound or new to say, just rehashes the same shit the same people want to desperately try to keep relevant for as long as possible... so they can be relevant. The rest are just artists and people who think about issues and read all sorts of sources--they may get influences and ideas very different from mine or yours, but these (relative few) aren't as bad).

This is the main problem with the way feminism presents itself in the arts and media. It's mean spirited, is outwardly hateful to men from one side of the face and insists that it's merely about gender equality from the other, bitchy, naggy, authoritarian, nanny-like bossy bullshit. And news flash, nobody likes "bossy." Just about everyone hates their boss (and as an aside, modern feminism seems to identify certain behaviors as "toxic masculinity", tells men not to do it, and then exalts when women participates in it. Disgusting!) It should be entertaining, tug at the heartstrings, whimsical, fun, and free-spirited, while still preaching responsibility and some measure of discipline, as in all things.

So, when I say "feminist" here, I mean in the loose sense that Siouxsie Sioux may be "feminist" for songs such as "Arabian Knights", "Red Light," or "Peek-a-boo." All of this shit just presents a perspective and paints a picture, but it doesn't turn to the camera and tell you how to think like so much of modern media does. It gets you to think about and possibly sympathize with an issue or situation, and the art stands on its own with and without any possible politics in mind.