Star Wars Griefing Thread (Formerly about Last Jedi) - It's nothing like Empire... like.... at all, we promise

Dr W

Heaven is void of light
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Now I just want a compilation of those cringy Babu Frik articles/tweets replaced with Reichsfuhrer Klaud

"There’s a new alien in the Star Wars and we love him and will protect him forever. We Stan Klaud."
The Klaud memes keep coming at an astronomical rate, as well as memed caps of the spoilers here.
VirginIXvsChadJoker.jpg
 

Attachments

Tour of Italy

Order your favorite Italian combinations online.
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The Klaud memes keep coming at an astronomical rate, as well as memed caps of the spoilers here.
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Jesus Christ that's awful. Holy shit. Are there any actual human beings on the Star Wars team at Disney anymore?

All I wanted was a good movie. It's not fucking rocket science. Star Wars is a property with a lot of lore and a ton of baggage in terms of the fanbase, but whoever thought that you could push the series on through sheer marketability and cheap, nonsense pandering is exceptional beyond what was previously humanly possible.

How incredibly dense do you have to be to look at that iconic scene and say "oh yes, this will resonate with people since it is a thing they like that made them feel feelings" while simultaneously not pausing for a even a fucking second to think about why it was iconic in the first place? Or even if it made a lick of goddamn sense in terms of the story?

As a related note, about a year ago I saw a car commercial that used the musical motif from the twin sunset scene, and it really drove home Disney's attitude towards the property. I get using the fun aspects for advertising; the adventure, the humor, whatever. If a kid wants to pretend their new sedan is an X-Wing, at least that's relatable. But to draw on one of the more poignant scenes like that, it showed that they really were willing to wring out every single dimension of emotional connection people had to the series and turn it into a machine to move product. They took Luke's forlorn longing for adventure, as he looked out over the familiar and mundane while wrestling with the feeling he was meant for more, encapsulated it in a 20 second TV spot, and used it to try to sell me a fucking Nissan.

For some reason that will always feel worse to me than any bullshit they manage to pull with the films themselves, although it looks like there's no reason to be hopeful on that front either.
 
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Oaat

Tanuki Says: メリークリスマス!
kiwifarms.net
My fellow Kiwis!

I have done something for this site which I never thought I would ever do.

I spent money. 😣

I was able to find a copy of the latest Empire magazine (which is eleven fucking dollars), and have scanned the Star Wars article, which is an interview with Jar Jar Abrams, where he heaps lies upon lies, while the interviewer fellates him.

I am sadly technologically inept, and don't have a fucking clue about how to copy and paste pdf files. But, I daresay there's a few massive autists here that could do us the favor!

Behold!
article.png

Text version incoming.

Edit: Formatting

Edit2: Here is the text version.

IT ALL STARTED with a Jane Campion retrospective. The Lincoln Center in New York was entering night two of an in-depth celebration of the Kiwi filmmaker's work when, during a sold-out screening of The Piano, one member of the audience received a text message. He then received another. And another. Hunched down in his seat towards the middle of the auditorium, screenwriter Chris Terrio glanced furtively at his mobile as yet another text pinged to life on his screen. It was from J.J. Abrams. Just like the last. And the dozen or so before that.

It was 10 September 2017, and several hours earlier Terrio had received the first in what would become a torrent of communication: "I've just signed on to Episode IX," it read. "We're gonna write a new script. Would you consider writing it with me?"

"He didn't even say the words 'Star' and 'Wars'," recalls Terrio, with a laugh. "He didn't have to. I'd been about to go off and direct a small movie, but when you hear Star Wars, everything else goes away."

Terrio agreed on the spot, planning to join Abrams in California as soon his schedule would allow. But the texts kept coming. Throughout the afternoon, thoughts, ideas and questions popped up one after the other; Abrams' frantic thumbs tapping out the first seeds of story and flinging them across the country to his newfound partner. And so, with Michael Nyrnan's haunting score swelling around him and a still-buzzing handset in his grasp, Terri° stood up, shuffled apologetically along a row of seats, and walked out of the cinema, leaving Campion's Oscar darling behind.

"J.J. is constantly brimming with ideas and, in the very best way, he's very impatient about them! So we just started getting into it then and there. I got on a plane to LA the next day."

Less than a week earlier, however, Episode IX's future hadn't looked nearly as certain. In development for the past two years under the auspices of Jurassic World director Colin Trevorrow, the film had abruptly flown off the rails on 5 September, when it was announced that Trevorrow was off the project. Rumours of script disagreements circled, but regardless of the reason, Lucasfilm had a serious problem: arguably the most important film in Star Wars' history suddenly had no director, no story and a release date drawing nearer by the day. So Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy sent up a flare to the one man she knew without any doubt could safely take Star Wars over the finish line.

"Getting involved in IX came as a bit of a shock," recalls J.J. Abrams. "I had completed VII, Rian [Johnson] was doing VIII, and I was not meant to do IX at all. But the opportunity to not just finish the trilogy, but to finish the story that George began — this trilogy of trilogies — was too compelling and too tempting to reject."

After delivering The Force Awakens, then the third-biggest movie in history, Abrams had taken a bow and walked away, returning to Bad Robot and a pair of TV pilots he'd been meaning to write. It was here, in his self-imposed exile, that Kennedy sought him out. Sure, it was an office just over a mile from Santa Monica pier rather than the grassy bluffs of Ahch-To, and Kennedy hadn't so much climbed 500 hand-carved steps as punched ten digits into her phone but, like a vision of Episode VIPs final moments, there she was. Unexpected. Holding out something Abrams had thought lost and daring him to take it back.

"It's exponentially the most daunting thing I've ever been involved with," Abrams admits, eyebrows raised as if he still can't quite believe the magnitude of the task. "But it was more exciting than it was anything."

The director sits across from us in his suite at Beverly Hills' Montage hotel, not far from where we last met, six years previously, when he'd just started work on a treatment for what would eventually become The Force Awakens. Abrams' return as Star Wars' Supreme Commander was announced just one day after Trevorrow's departure, allaying the fears of both fans and shareholders alike: voices just a day before crying out in terror, now suddenly silenced. But with only two years to end a saga that had been four decades in the telling, it was clear from the outset he was going to need some help. And so he composed a text (then several more) and sent them flying towards a movie theatre 3,000 miles away, where the Oscar-winning screenwriter of Argo was attempting to watch a film.

"I've admired Chris Terrio's writing fora long time. I called on him because I knew it would be a challenge. But I didn't know it would be quite as challenging as it was."

In a time when vast, interconnected stories have become commonplace, and breadcrumbs to the payoffs in Avengers: Endgame can be traced back ten or even 20 films, it's hard to believe that the Star Wars sequel trilogy didn't have its course firmly locked in before Episode VII ever left the spaceport. But, just as Abrams himself left neither chart nor compass for Rian Johnson to navigate with, so he began work on The Rise Of Skywalker with nothing to guide him but his wits. It is, by Abrams' own admission, his preferred method of working. An instinctive storyteller by nature, his impulse is to do what feels right in the moment, rather than slavishly adhere to some pre-ordained master plan. Very appropriately fora franchise so rooted in this exact philosophy, Abram? inclination has always been, as Alec Guinness once sagely advised, to stretch out with his feelings.

"You can't plan everything in advance — which my 'Revenge Of The Jedi' poster proves," he says. "You have a better idea and then you implement it. When I was working on VII, I'd be lying if I said I knew everything that was gonna happen in VIII and IX. I had some ideas, but we had a release date that required us to work on VII!"

So Abrams and Terrio started from scratch. They spitballed ideas during the day, swapped rapid-fire texts at night and, piece-by-piece, set about exploring the fundamental questions this final movie had to address. Not least of all the aftermath of The Last Jedi, in which Rian Johnson, continuing Abrams' story, had made some rather significant changes.
________

THERE'S A WELL-WORN dramatic principle most commonly ascribed to Anton Chekhov that insists if you see a gun in the first act of a play, it must go off by act three or you're simply wasting the audience's time. The same, it appears, is true of dark side degenerates as, despite being sidelined in The Last Jedi, Chekhov's Knights Of Ren will finally go off in The Rise Of Skywalker.

The Knights — from which Kylo draws the latter part of his name — are a nightmarish squad of enforcers who do the bidding of the former Ben Solo. A rag. tag band of thugs and killers decked in black just like their leader, though far more battleworn. Armoured in disparate styles — one sports a cowl, one an angry welder's mask, another a checkered draughtboard faceplate — they pack a similarly eclectic arsenal, from multi-barrelled assault cannon to oversized, anime-style sword, poleaxe and a wicked-looking mace.

Referenced portentously in The Force Awakens and glimpsed so very briefly during Rey's vision on Takodana, the Knights and their role in Kyles fall from grace were set up as a major piece of the Star Wars puzzle. That is until Johnson, who clearly didn't share Abrams' interest, dropped the idea, sweeping them briskly under the rug next to the mystery of Rey's parentage and the bisected corpse of Supreme Leader Snoke. "Let the past die," instructed Kylo Ren in The Last Jedi. "Kill it, if you have to." A sentiment, one could argue, that cut to the very heart of Johnson's film.

"We thought about that line a lot," says Terrio. "Rian did something that any good second act will do, which is create the antithesis. In The Force Awakens Luke Skywalker is a myth Rey's obsessed with and there's a warm embrace of the past. What Rian suggested is the past is a mixed bag and you can't rely upon it to tell you where to go in the future. What we're doing with Episode IX is trying to create a synthesis between those two points of view."

And so, just as the investigation into Rey's lineage looks set to be reopened, so too are the Knights back with a vengeance (not to mention Abrams talisman Greg Grunberg as pilot Snap Wexley). With Johnson's tenure over, we're playing in Abrams' yard once more, although our suggestion that he might somehow be trying to course-correct is given short shrift.

"I never found myself trying to repair anything," Abrams interjects. "If I had done VIII, I would have done things differently, just as Rian would have done things differently if he had done VII. But having worked on television series, I was accustomed to creating stories and characters that then were run by other people. If you're willing to walk away from the thing that you created and you believe it's in trustworthy hands, you have to accept that some of the decisions being made are not gonna be the same that you would make. And if you come back into it, you have to honour what's been done."

And what has been done is significant. Luke Skywalker is dead, passing on his knowledge and the mantle of last Jedi to Rey; The Resistance has been all but wiped out; Snoke is gone; and Kylo Ren — now Supreme Leader Ren — is more broken than ever, riven by conflict through the unlikely bond he forged with Rey. Bold and decisive, Johnson's decisions changed the board entirely, his sharp turns and gear shifts delighting some while earning the ire of others.

"Any time you are telling a story that people deeply care about, there is bound to be discussion and debate," says Kathleen Kennedy. "That is something that has always been fundamental to the fabric of Star Wars."

For Abrams and Terrio, meanwhile, the new landscape also brought with it new possibilities.

"Some of the most interesting scenes in The Last Jedi are the conversations between Rey and Ren," says Terrio. "We've tried to pick up that complicated relationship that really has been present ever since the interrogation in Episode VII. When Ren takes off his mask, there's a nakedness about him with Rey that he doesn't express to anyone else. Rian developed that in fascinating ways and we've been able to develop it even further."

Ren, left pointedly bare-faced by Johnson throughout VIII, now hides his face once more. It's a development that, while not a rebuke to The Last Jedi, demonstrates the different touchstones that resonate with each director. Although, Abrams expands, reuniting Kylo with his mask is about more than just sinister aesthetics.

"Having him be masked, but also fractured, is a very intentional thing. Like that classic Japanese process of taking ceramics and repairing them, and how the breaks in a way define the beauty of the piece as much as the original itself. As fractured as Ren is, the mask becomes a visual representation of that. There's something about this that tells his history. His mask doesn't ultimately hide him and his behaviour is revealed."

Ren's temptation by the light, like Rey's temptation by the dark, forms the spine of a moral ambiguity that Johnson built on in 'VII and very much carries over to IX, bringing with it a sense that George Lucas' more clearly defined duality might be a relic of a simpler time. Neither light nor dark, The Rise Of Skywalker and its characters exist more within what could be considered the grey side of the Force — something underscored by the tantalising footage of `Darth Rey' (complete with cowl, hangover pallor and double-bladed red lightsaber) that closed Abrams' D23 Expo footage presentation in Anaheim in August.

"I'd rather let that one lie," he deflects, when pressed on the subject. But I will say that the movie has a number of things that you wouldn't expect to have happen and that you wouldn't expect certain characters to do. There are surprises along the way." He smiles, mischievously. "And that's one of them."
________

THE VALLEY OF The Moon in Southern Jordan has seen its share of action. Cut into the red sandstone cliffs near Aqaba, the striking lowlands known in Arabic as Wadi Rum have been visited by both real and fictional Lawrences of Arabia, stood in for the face of Mars, been the birth place of the Alien in Prometheus, and will next year double as the eponymous desert planet in Denis Villeneuve's Dune. It's no stranger to stormtroopers, either, having played host to the ill-fated Jedha outpost in Gareth Edwards' Rogue One. Today, though, Wadi Rum is a different part of the galaxy entirely, standing in for Pasaana: a new locale in the canon, and home to the bedouin-like Aki-Aki: a nomadic race of walrus-like aliens with twin tentacles dangling from their maws in place of tusks.

Pasaana, along with the nippier climes of snow planet Kijimi, is one of several new worlds visited by The Rise Of Skywalker. But most importantly, it's a place where the heroes we've become acquainted with over the past two films will come together at last.

"The heart of Star Wars for me is the group of unlikely bedfellows on a breakneck adventure," says Abrams. "And in Rise Of Skywalker it's the biggest and most dastardly threat the galaxy has seen. The opportunity here was to have this group that has now become a surrogate family have to deal with this massive horror the war to end all wars. Not just on the outside, but on the inside, which is to say it's meant to be as much of a challenge personally as it is physically."

Abrams' war of wars has been well equipped: The First Order is stacked with new brass in the form of Richard E. Grant's Allegiant General Pryde, neo-fascist ranks swollen by triangular-winged TIE Daggers and blood-red garrisons of newly commissioned Sith troopers, their angular crimson armour giving a fresh twist on the faceless squaddies — much to Hasbro's delight. The Resistance, too, will see its share of reinforcements, including Billy Dee Williams' Lando Calrissian — reprising the role after 36 years. Even General Leia Organa will return: the late Carrie Fisher making an appearance thanks to the discovery of unused footage that somehow fit the narrative perfectly.

The action itself has been teased in the barest glimpses: Rey and Kylo duelling on the wreckage of a Death Star; Rebel X-Wings and blockade runners fleeing destruction; a sky bristling with Imperial Star Destroyers, their numbers great enough to black out the stars.

The presence of Old Empire firepower, easily overlooked, points to The Rise Of Skywalker's biggest curveball to date. Back in April, when Abrams showed the first trailer at Star Wars Celebration in Chicago, the reveal of the film's title was almost eclipsed by the familiar cackle of the original Emperor echoing over those final frames. When Ian Mc.Diarmid himself walked out to demand, in full Palpatine rasp, that the projector "roll it again", all present lost their shit in unison. How could this be? Is he a clone? A Force projection? Did he survive that fateful plummet down the Death Star shaft? Could Palpatine have been telling Anakin the truth when he spoke of Darth Plagueis The Wise's cure for death? Irrespective of the fine print, Star Wars' biggest of bads is officially back in business.

"Some people feel like we shouldn't revisit the idea of Palpatine, and I completely understand that," Abrams concedes. "But if you're looking at these nine films as one story, I don't know many books where the last few chapters have nothing to do with those that have come before. If you look at the first eight films, all the set-ups of what we're doing in Mare there in plain view,"

The sheer scale of the task he's undertaken cannot be overstated. Star Wars has been, by far, the most enduring and influential story of the modern era. Having to put the capstone on a saga that has shaped both childhoods and adult lives for several generations is something neither Abrams, nor producer Kathleen Kennedy, looking ahead to what the future holds for Star Wars, take at all lightly.

"We don't have a crystal ball," says Kennedy. "We tried to look at Solo and see if we could do two movies a year, and we found, 'Hmm, that's not going to work.' So we backed off of that a little. But that doesn't mean we don't think about lots of different stories. That's the exciting thing about this universe.

"It's been an honour to inherit and continue this iconic saga that has touched audiences for so many years, and we feel the weight of that every time we set out to tell these stories."

The wider universe will, of course, live on. Whether through The Mandalorian on TV, or all-new movie sagas currently in development by Johnson and Game Of Thrones' David Benioff and D.B. Weiss. But for the core story, what for so many people is Star Wars, the final destination is now in sight.

"I've always loved the start of something," says Abrams, "because of what it promises. Endings are hard. A great ending not only needs to honour everything that's come before but, whether it's a novel, a series or a film, you want to have it feel like it could end no other way."

And so it comes back to feeling. In a world of meticulously planned franchises and strategic, multi-phased rollouts, Star Wars, at its core, has always trusted in The Force. Abrams had not expected to be here, had not expected to finish this tale. But now, as he places the final pieces of the puzzle, he feels like it was always meant to be. There's a symmetry to him being the one to deliver The Rise Of Skywalker, just as there is in the fact that, faced with this near insurmountable challenge, his impulse was not to assemble story groups or worry about the top-down view, but to switch off his targeting computer, let go his conscious self and act on instinct.

"This story is alive, and you have to listen to it," he says. "When you land on something that gives you the chills, that's the only way you know if it feels right. You can deconstruct it all you want and try and make sense of how you found it, but somehow it finds you."

He pauses, reflecting for a moment. "I don't know how to explain it. Just the way I can't quite explain how we had this footage of Carrie that we're using. You can say, 'Oh well, it's just luck, it just happened to be,' but it feels like something else. And I neither can nor want to explain any of it."

Just as every saga has a beginning, so too will this one find its end. Abrams and Terrio have taken Lucas' vision to its conclusion, and the story that began on 25 May 1977 will end on 19 December 2019.

"It's been a pretty crazy ride," reflects Terrio. "When I was a kid watching Return Of The Jedi on loop, I felt like I was the only person Yoda was speaking to. And then there I was all these years later, sitting in a tent in Jordan doing this film. You have this highly personal relationship to Star Wars, and then, suddenly, you find yourself right in the middle of it. That feeling is sort of indescribable."

It's one that, at the very least, is almost certainly worth having a movie interrupted for.
 
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Kiwi Lime Pie

🎄 The tasteful holiday treat. 🥝🥧🐈
kiwifarms.net
- Based Klaud
- Babu Frik Babu Frik Babu Frik We stand Babu Frik
- The Janitor's sister from the planet Kaffir, with her amazing energy bow which is just a less convenient blaster
- Sorry Bitch, Poe's ex lover
- General Wyte Pryde
- Whoever the fuck Matt Smith is playing
- Possibly Boolio (seen on the LEGO Falcon, but could be another 'Zuvio')
- Depending on your point of view, the Knights of Ren, Lando, and Palpatine, who are reintroduced after one and two movies of being absent, respectively
Having so many new characters who may or may not be crucial for the film -- or even the trilogy -- definitely comes across as a sign of desperation. Even if the film somehow succeeds on any sort of level, how many of these characters are going to be pointless one and done characters we won't see again? Then again, Disney Wars is known for using one-off characters in an attempt to prop up weaker aspects of the SW franchise.

"Babu Frik" keeps making me think of the Hanna-Barbera character named Babu whose magic chant of "Yapple Dapple!" rarely worked as intended. I'd say he might be a better character for the film, but he deserves better than anything Disney currently cranks out.

So what's your guys' thoughts on the Clone Wars series? Both the Genndy 2003 one and the Filoni 2008 one.
I stumbled across Filoni's version completely by accident. The one thing I liked was seeing Anakin developed a bit better in that we saw him as a Jedi who showed darker tendencies that went unnoticed due to being assigned to missions apart from anyone who would notice them. I disliked how drawn out the series felt after 5 seasons (8 would have been way too many IMO), and the whole idea of Anakin having an apprentice didn't seem very logical or feel natural. It felt more like Ahsoka was shoehorned in to have a new female lead character when we already had enough female characters that could have been developed more than they were instead of being nothing more than cardboard cutouts and NPCs most of the time. I also though the Mortis Arc went overboard with its forced foreshadowing of Anakin becoming Vader.

I decided to watch Genndy's Clone Wars after @Flexo's comments in the thread. While I enjoy how much story got told in the relatively-short amount of screen time, the one thing I disliked was how much it jumped back and forth between separate subplots and scenes. That made it difficult at times ot know if everything was happening in linear time or concurrently. It's a shame that some of the scenes from this show couldn't have been in Filoni's version, but the latter seems to have supplanted the former in terms of canon (unfortunately).

I feel legitimately bad for Kelly Marie Tran, I really do. Gets cast purely on the basis of Rian's fetish, only to end up in the centre of a (faked) online controversy before being sidelined by what looks to be JJ's penis from a parallel universe where he grew up in a Christian household.
I feel bad for her too. She seems like a rather attractive woman and a good actress. I'm sure the idea of being in the SW ST was an exciting idea for her until shooting began and she learned what her role actually entailed and what the character looked like. To see her in a role where her best attributes were muted and made as unappealing as possible is head-scratching. I hope she's able to find a better film to be involved with next that lets her best traits show more.
 

Zaryiu

Nobody important
kiwifarms.net
I mean I think I understand how the empire works:

The Emperor rules through Moffs(regional governors)...

Each regional system is controlled by a Moff, that controls their own personalized military force. That force is supplied, manned, and maintained through that region. That military force patrols a region. Moffs act like Lords in a feudal system....

At any time, military assets can be pulled to reinforce military operations.

Whatever military assets, not controlled by Moffs, are independent task forces. They carry out concentrated military operations/campaigns...

So, the empire can keep totalitarian control at all times...
West end Games had a chart of how the governmental worked i'll post as soon as i find it.
Edit: Oh that tweet, yeag unfortunately Hamill has TDS too and that wasn't the first time he targeted Trump but that was over the line
Edit 2:
She isnt a character
And she's no Jedi, fuck remember how everytime she gets stronger in a fight she's clearly pissed off? Rey should never be on the good guy side, she's closer to being a dark force user
Did you guy knoe Harrison Ford is a friend of Polansky?
 
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Maggots on a Train v2

new and improved account
kiwifarms.net
I just can't envision someone who buys this tacky shit.

Even a 'fan girl' would probably leave it to plush dolls and knickknacks. This is expensive cookery, sold largely on gimmick. Is it even of quality?

Please, someone show me the idiot who buys this crap? They must be found, and catalogued for research...

I think even Steven Sansweet would show restraint..
I think they went all in on the audience they have wanted all along, who already occasionally buy traditional overpriced Didneyshit as a status symbol, wealthy traditional homemaker moms. The people who can afford to have $1000/day family vacations, run popular social media accounts, and reenact pinterest ideas. It will hopefully continue to blow up in Disney's faces, because I don't think most of those women give a shit about any pulp science fiction beyond humoring their sons, and the overpriced Mickey Mouse crap they buy, they buy it for themselves, to fit their existing curated home decor.
 

Save the Loli

kiwifarms.net
So when's the clickbait articles coming out on how Klaud has been corrupted by the alt-right and is now a hate symbol? Can we get the blue checkmarks to start REEEEEEEEing about it, or best of all, get Klaud to the SPLC and ADL?
Did you guy knoe Harrison Ford is a friend of Polansky?
Not surprising. A lot of people including George Lucas were huge fans and supporters of Roman Polanski. The 70s were truly the height of the pedo movement since NAMBLA was at their height and marching alongside the gay rights movement and all sorts of people wanting to abolish age of consent laws like a group of the foremost intellectuals of the day like Foucault and the rest of the postmodernist crew.
 

Pixy Misa

Your local evil magical girl.
kiwifarms.net
Just as every saga has a beginning, so too will this one find its end. Abrams and Terrio have taken Lucas' vision to its conclusion, and the story that began on 25 May 1977 will end on 19 December 2019.
Jesus, such arrogance. I can't believe he seriously believes that.

No J.J, The saga ended in May 25, 1983, with the "Return of the Jedi". The empire lost in that movie and we got a happy ending. We even got scenes about the whole galaxy celebrating.

You are only finishing the mess started by you in December 2015.

I suppose that's why he is bringing Palpatine back, to "finally" defeat the main villain of the saga... that was already defeated in 1983?
 
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Oaat

Tanuki Says: メリークリスマス!
kiwifarms.net
dark side degenerates
:tomgirl:
oversized, anime-style sword
whyyyy
Referenced portentously in The Force Awakens and glimpsed so very briefly during Rey's vision on Takodana, the Knights and their role in Kyles fall from grace were set up as a major piece of the Star Wars puzzle. That is until Johnson, who clearly didn't share Abrams' interest, dropped the idea, sweeping them briskly under the rug next to the mystery of Rey's parentage and the bisected corpse of Supreme Leader Snoke. "Let the past die," instructed Kylo Ren in The Last Jedi. "Kill it, if you have to." A sentiment, one could argue, that cut to the very heart of Johnson's film.
...
And so, just as the investigation into Rey's lineage looks set to be reopened, so too are the Knights back with a vengeance (not to mention Abrams talisman Greg Grunberg as pilot Snap Wexley). With Johnson's tenure over, we're playing in Abrams' yard once more, although our suggestion that he might somehow be trying to course-correct is given short shrift.
...
Ren, left pointedly bare-faced by Johnson throughout VIII, now hides his face once more. It's a development that, while not a rebuke to The Last Jedi, demonstrates the different touchstones that resonate with each director. Although, Abrams expands, reuniting Kylo with his mask is about more than just sinister aesthetics.
:thinking:
Ren's temptation by the light, like Rey's temptation by the dark, forms the spine of a moral ambiguity that Johnson built on in 'VII and very much carries over to IX, bringing with it a sense that George Lucas' more clearly defined duality might be a relic of a simpler time. Neither light nor dark, The Rise Of Skywalker and its characters exist more within what could be considered the grey side of the Force
And yet the conflict has gotten more black and white than ever. No real moral ambiguity is being added, it's just the philosophies of the Jedi and Sith that are being tossed out.
the striking lowlands known in Arabic as Wadi Rum ... will next year double as the eponymous desert planet in Denis Villeneuve's Dune.
But the planet was only informally called Dune. Ok that was nitpicky.
Today, though, Wadi Rum is a different part of the galaxy entirely, standing in for Pasaana: a new locale in the canon, and home to the bedouin-like Aki-Aki: a nomadic race of walrus-like aliens with twin tentacles dangling from their maws in place of tusks.

Pasaana, along with the nippier climes of snow planet Kijimi, is one of several new worlds visited by The Rise Of Skywalker. But most importantly, it's a place where the heroes we've become acquainted with over the past two films will come together at last.
Confirmed planets, although I don't see Exogol.
"Some people feel like we shouldn't revisit the idea of Palpatine, and I completely understand that," Abrams concedes. "But if you're looking at these nine films as one story, I don't know many books where the last few chapters have nothing to do with those that have come before.
This is why he made TFA a soft reboot with new characters rehashing the same scenario from chapter one, right?
I hate to do more "But what if it was GOOD" posting but
Unofficial Kiwi Farms donut steal Science Fantasy Setting when?
 

BScCollateral

kiwifarms.net
Still, better than anything Disney has shat out, with the sorta exception of Rogue One.
I admit it's a minority opinion, but that whole plot point did nothing for me.

Maybe it's because I think of Tusken Raiders as "monsters" instead of "people," probably because we've seen absolutely nothing to suggest they're anything more than tool-using animals in cheap costumes. Everybody else is "Here, this is where he becomes Darth Vader" and I'm "You killed the Tusken Raiders? Fine with me."
 

Intelligent Calcium

Here comes Scrooge!
kiwifarms.net
I admit it's a minority opinion, but that whole plot point did nothing for me.

Maybe it's because I think of Tusken Raiders as "monsters" instead of "people," probably because we've seen absolutely nothing to suggest they're anything more than tool-using animals in cheap costumes. Everybody else is "Here, this is where he becomes Darth Vader" and I'm "You killed the Tusken Raiders? Fine with me."
With the force it always seems to be about what the person feels and not if the target of those feelings deserves it or not. Jedi can clearly kill all they want as long as it's for the common good and not out of passion, so from a force user's perspective it's less about killing the Tusken and more about flying into a murderous rage which had the by-product of a few dead Tusken and opened Anakin up to the dark side.
 

Dr W

Heaven is void of light
kiwifarms.net
So when's the clickbait articles coming out on how Klaud has been corrupted by the alt-right and is now a hate symbol? Can we get the blue checkmarks to start REEEEEEEEing about it, or best of all, get Klaud to the SPLC and ADL?
I think Based Klaud needs to get a foothold on Twitter, Reddit, and some other boards on 4chan. So far he's just a /tv/ meme.
Unofficial Kiwi Farms donut steal Science Fantasy Setting when?
Fuck it I'll get to writing.
 

Poe-Shen Zcela

kiwifarms.net
I wish I was on vacation already so I can post dank Klaud kontent.

It's weird in hindsight that Lucas would even want to take on the burden of writing and directing the Prequel trilogy all by himself, rather than take on an executive producer role, he took the hard way and it didn't pay off.

But I'm sure ego played a role, most people didn't know how much of a group effort the OT was back in the day, I certainly didn't even know he didn't actually direct the second and third films until many years after the fact, I'm sure most people just assumed Lucas did everything and the fact that he didn't probably ate at him and he wanted to "prove" Star Wars was truly his baby by doing all of the heavy lifting for the prequel trilogy.
I think it's a mix of ego and regret. The ordeal of the OT for George involved him--a self-admitted shitty writer who didn't enjoy writing--learning how to write movies as well as direct them, and learning how to make warm, people-friendly movies in conjunction with a solid team that challenged him frequently. His best work came out of these constant challenges, but they took their toll, and by RotJ, he just wanted it to be over.

By ESB, George's ultimate contribution to the film was learning to enjoy writing a screenplay, which he did when he wrote the twist about Vader being Luke's father. Credit where it's due; since Leigh Brackett had just passed away, he had to pick up the task. But by the end of it all, George hated the experience of working on ESB. He hated it because he was putting ALL of his money on the line, and he became extremely nervous with how Irvin Kershner was directing the film. In the best case, he would make money and be able to fund his dream of building Skywalker Ranch, which was more intended for indie avantgarde stuff than for more Star Wars; in the worst case, he'd lose it all and would never be independent. That's why he ended up parting ways with Gary Kurtz and Irvin Kershner with RotJ and hired Richard Marquand. Rich was easier to handle and direct from afar than Irvin, and George just wanted to make sure he could move on to Skywalker Ranch and put the experience of ESB behind him. Unfortunately, what followed RotJ was his divorce with Marcia.

Speak for yourself, I've never been this excited to not pay for a movie in my life.
Ya boi, welcome to the new age. It's not about getting excited for movies anymore, it's all about getting hype for their inevitable failure and the ensuing fallout.

West end Games had a chart of how the governmental worked i'll post as soon as i find it.
Edit: Oh that tweet, yeag unfortunately Hamill has TDS too and that wasn't the first time he targeted Trump but that was over the line
Edit 2:

And she's no Jedi, fuck remember how everytime she gets stronger in a fight she's clearly pissed off? Rey should never be on the good guy side, she's closer to being a dark force user
Did you guy knoe Harrison Ford is a friend of Polansky?
Worse yet is the story about the Hamills forcing a woman to have an abortion.

People were saying stuff like "I always liked Harrison Ford better anyways, nyah", but he's a tool too. Look at him virtue-signaling his support for Greta Thunderberg.
 
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