Star Wars Griefing Thread (THE RISE OF SKYWALKER SPOILERS) - Safety off

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Mississippi Motorboater

Untouchable Busty Southern Belle
kiwifarms.net
The post-Endor EU as a whole:

Having picked up the post-ROTJ storyline following my utter disgust with The Farce Awakens, with reservations fostered by all the negative online hearsay surrounding the EU, I can finally give my assessment of the major story arcs that comprise of the OT Heroes’ continuing story, and that of the Solo Children.

Simply put? This era of Star Wars storytelling was nothing short of amazing, and everyone who bad-mouthed these stories as being a convoluted web of irredeemable gimmickry can take a nice, sprawling leap out of an airlock, and take their Godawful taste with them.

I’m astounded that a storyline spanning this many authors over this many years managed to continuously churn out such memorable characters and fascinating concepts, seemingly never running out of ideas. Vapid and contrived television series today don’t even have that impressive standard of long-term quality, and those are made with money and star-power practically thrown at them. This continuity was crafted by a bunch of consumer fiction writers on a smidgeon of the same budget and resources, making up for both with the one thing many stories today—including the modern Star Wars dreck regurgitated by Disney: a competent understanding of the universe. For as controversial as some authors may be, whatever creative quirks and foibles they may have, they demonstrated a hundred times over how much better they understand Star Wars better than anyone working at Lucasfilm at the time of this post.

This isn’t me having unbelievably high standards. Fuck, this isn’t me even declaring that the Expanded Universe is in any way perfect, or uniform in quality. But it is a testament to the fact that you don’t have to get everything right, so long as you get the important things right: treating the characters, and world with the reverence they deserve, preserving the growth and development of their respective journeys, be willing to at least TRY to create a consistent flow of events and lore, and most of all…be creative.

The reason I was able to soldier from the Thrawn Trilogy all the way to Crucible is because the writers always found a way to keep my interest. The concepts were always cool and expansive; the new factions or characters were always interesting, and made the universe feel even bigger. Writers were willing to take risks—go to dark places, amp up the violence and tragedy, push the characters through adversity. They weren’t afraid to make the Star Wars galaxy to a place on par with high fantasy or sprawling sci-fi, to bring the sensibilities of other genres to the universe just like George Lucas did. Except while he wanted to play it safe, and commit to a balancing act between making a story for children and adults, the EU authors made the plunge to just appeal to adult readers. To the people who didn’t just watch SW to revel in the same old feel-good nostalgia, and weren’t hellbent on keeping the setting and story saddled to the OT. The EU was where authors was allowed to branch out, to explore…to dream. Not all of them succeeded, but their heart was always in the right place, rooted in the dedication to make Star Wars an engaging realm of fiction that asked difficult questions, traveled to incredible places, and made the universe bigger than it had ever been…and those efforts paid off.

I could list every boundlessly-creative, high-flying concept that came out of these post-ROTJ books and comics…the ones that are dear to my heart, like the Yuuzhan Vong War or the ethereal journeys into the Force itself. I could list all the instances of fantastic continuity and world-building, the memorable factions and antagonists that felt larger than life. And those things are very much how the EU made the galaxy feel bigger, and weightier with detail. But for me, the best thing it had to offer…was the characters. That’s why the EU felt so much bigger than what we saw on-screen, and why it will always be my continuity for Star Wars. They made the universe feel massive, guiding major events with their actions, embarking on journeys of redemption or self-growth, living and loving and dying, either as a stalwart protagonist or recurring villain.

What made the EU special, and what continues to provide it with its brightest luster, were its characters. The stories weaved around them, and helped shape the wider universe. The prospect of finishing ROTJ, and proceeding to “what happens next”, has never been more exciting, or fulfilling. Because I know the best stories and characters are still to come. I never tired of the post-Endor stories precisely because I loved these characters so much…and they will be the reason I keep coming back, for years to come.

To all of the authors who made this post-Endor continuity what it was—for taking Star Wars, something that was good, and making it special—you have a lot to be proud of, because you’re making new fans like me every day.

Bravo, and thank you.
 
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Uranus Pink

kiwifarms.net
If you want Mandalorian stuff from the Expanded Universe, best stick to the Tales of the Jedi comics and the KOTOR games and comics. Best depiction of them yet, as ruthless conquerors that would make the 40K Imperium blush.
Hard disagree as the IoM will and did not suffer the existence of the witch (force users), xenos (non-humans) and the heretic (nonbelievers of the Imperial creed) and purged all of them from their conquest. Secondly the IoM kept most it's conquered terriority after 10,000 years of war. Unlike the Mandalorians who have little more than jack and shit to their name after being repeatedly roflstomped by the Republic and Jedi over the same time span.
 

LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
Going back to the clones, watching the Bad Batch episodes in Season 7 really strains credulity with Palpatine's plan. Rex was about to share what Fives discovered about the clones with Cody, why didn't he share it after Anaxes was taken? I mean, just imagine the situation:

Rex: "Here's everything Fives learned about the clones and how they're controlling us! The Jedi don't know anything about it!"
*shows files to Cody*
Cody: "By the Force! I have to share this with the other Clone Commanders right away!"

First, Cody and Rex will know it and have their control chips removed. Then the rest of the clone commanders do it. Then the officers, sergeants, and eventually the troopers do it. A week later, every single clone has a scar across his head that they try to cover up with skin cream, bandages, wigs, etc., and when Order 66 is activated, this happens:

76710782_2536178033096099_7714831535106424832_n.jpg

Really, the only reason this whole thing happened is because Rex didn't tell anyone about what Fives discovered after the Battle of Anaxes.

Hard disagree as the IoM will and did not suffer the existence of the witch (force users), xenos (non-humans) and the heretic (nonbelievers of the Imperial creed) and purged all of them from their conquest. Secondly the IoM kept most it's conquered terriority after 10,000 years of war. Unlike the Mandalorians who have little more than jack and shit to their name after being repeatedly roflstomped by the Republic and Jedi over the same time span.
The Mandalorians took half the galaxy from the Republic during the Neo-Crusader days. They also had their version of the Imperial Creed (Way of the Mandalore) where they worshiped war itself instead of some rotting corpse, and they nearly brought down a galactic government that united most of the galaxy against them. In contrast, the Imperium's enemies fought each other just as much as they fought the Imperium (one of the bigger conflicts in the 40K galaxy is Hive Fleet Leviathan against the Ork Empire of Octarius, with barely any involvement from the Imperium at all) so the Imperium didn't last that long on their strength alone, but also by virtue of sheer luck that all their enemies were divided factions that fought each other regularly, sapping much of their strength. If someone united all those alien and heretic factions against them, the Imperium would fall within the year.

The Mandalorians were also more liberal about razing planets, in comparison to the Imperium where burning the wrong planet will land an Inquisitor in hot waters.

Also, even Mandalorian cannon-fodder had beskar armor, which is a stunning contrast when compared to Imperium grunts with flak jackets. Add in souped-up blasters, disruptors, and rippers combined with Basilisk War Droids that can blow up entire bases and planet-glassing nukes, and you've got yourself an army of elites that necessitated galactic unity to stop.

Mandalorians_Neo-Crusaders.jpg


The post-Mandalorian Wars Mandalorians are like what if the Imperium lost the war and was dissolved, but its warriors maintained its traditions while adapting to a new galaxy where new factions (like the Tau) would hire them as mercenaries to fight their wars.

Let no one say that I hate all Mandalorians. I do love some Mandalorians, especially the Neo Crusaders, becuase they were actually a real power that was also intellectually honest about being brutal killers.

 
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Uranus Pink

kiwifarms.net
All you are doing is showing LusasFilm ripoff "borrowed" from Rogue Trader/Warhammer 40K which existed since around 1986 before the modern SW EU began. Cause what I am seeing is a copy and paste job with the names switch out.
 
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White Devil

Well I may be a monster, but you're gay.
kiwifarms.net
All you are doing is showing LusasFilm ripoff "borrowed" from Rogue Trader/Warhammer 40K which existed since around 1986 before the modern SW EU began. Cause what I am seeing is a copy and paste job with the names switch out.
Was 40k even popular in the US in the early-mid 80s?
 

LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
All you are doing is showing LusasFilm ripoff "borrowed" from Rogue Trader/Warhammer 40K which existed since around 1986 before the modern SW EU began. Cause what I am seeing is a copy and paste job with the names switch out.
And Warhammer 40K pretty much ripped off Dune, Starship Troopers, and Lord of the Rings. Shit, they even copied the Chaos symbol and idea from the Elric Saga. The only difference is that Star Wars is honest about being a pastiche of other works, with Lucas openly admitting that he was inspired by other films and works. 40K authors pretend to be original, yet damn near everything about it is a ripoff, from the Necrons being Egyptian Terminators, and the Tyranids being inspired by the Aliens franchise.

Also, I highly doubt they ripped off the Imperium. The Mandalorians in Tales of the Jedi/KOTOR were mostly inspired by the Mongols or the Spartans, while the Imperium of Man has a more Roman/Medieval influence. Those are two very different things. But if you think every franchise with power-armored space marines is a ripoff 40K, then you obviously didn't realize the idea of space marines far predates 40K. Shit, it predates World War 2, with the first story mentioning Space Marines coming out in the 1930s.
 
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Uranus Pink

kiwifarms.net
Was 40k even popular in the US in the early-mid 80s?
I don't know about the 80ies but by the time 2nd Edition came out in the early 90ies it was very popular in the United States.

GeeDubs already had it's ass thoroughly fucked with the Chapterhouse lawsuit and settlement where iirc almost everything they copyrighted and trademarked that was public domain or belong to someone else got yanked from them back around 07 or 08. Hence their new naming scheme for everything for the past 10 plus years.
 
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LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
The post-Endor EU as a whole:

Having picked up the post-ROTJ storyline following my utter disgust with The Farce Awakens, with reservations fostered by all the negative online hearsay surrounding the EU, I can finally give my assessment of the major story arcs that comprise of the OT Heroes’ continuing story, and that of the Solo Children.

Simply put? This era of Star Wars storytelling was nothing short of amazing, and everyone who bad-mouthed these stories as being a convoluted web of irredeemable gimmickry can take a nice, sprawling leap out of an airlock, and take their Godawful taste with them.

I’m astounded that a storyline spanning this many authors over this many years managed to continuously churn out such memorable characters and fascinating concepts, seemingly never running out of ideas. Vapid and contrived television series today don’t even have that impressive standard of long-term quality, and those are made with money and star-power practically thrown at them. This continuity was crafted by a bunch of consumer fiction writers on a smidgeon of the same budget and resources, making up for both with the one thing many stories today—including the modern Star Wars dreck regurgitated by Disney: a competent understanding of the universe. For as controversial as some authors may be, whatever creative quirks and foibles they may have, they demonstrated a hundred times over how much better they understand Star Wars better than anyone working at Lucasfilm at the time of this post.

This isn’t me having unbelievably high standards. Fuck, this isn’t me even declaring that the Expanded Universe is in any way perfect, or uniform in quality. But it is a testament to the fact that you don’t have to get everything right, so long as you get the important things right: treating the characters, and world with the reverence they deserve, preserving the growth and development of their respective journeys, be willing to at least TRY to create a consistent flow of events and lore, and most of all…be creative.

The reason I was able to soldier from the Thrawn Trilogy all the way to Crucible is because the writers always found a way to keep my interest. The concepts were always cool and expansive; the new factions or characters were always interesting, and made the universe feel even bigger. Writers were willing to take risks—go to dark places, amp up the violence and tragedy, push the characters through adversity. They weren’t afraid to make the Star Wars galaxy to a place on par with high fantasy or sprawling sci-fi, to bring the sensibilities of other genres to the universe just like George Lucas did. Except while he wanted to play it safe, and commit to a balancing act between making a story for children and adults, the EU authors made the plunge to just appeal to adult readers. To the people who didn’t just watch SW to revel in the same old feel-good nostalgia, and weren’t hellbent on keeping the setting and story saddled to the OT. The EU was where authors was allowed to branch out, to explore…to dream. Not all of them succeeded, but their heart was always in the right place, rooted in the dedication to make Star Wars an engaging realm of fiction that asked difficult questions, traveled to incredible places, and made the universe bigger than it had ever been…and those efforts paid off.

I could list every boundlessly-creative, high-flying concept that came out of these post-ROTJ books and comics…the ones that are dear to my heart, like the Yuuzhan Vong War or the ethereal journeys into the Force itself. I could list all the instances of fantastic continuity and world-building, the memorable factions and antagonists that felt larger than life. And those things are very much how the EU made the galaxy feel bigger, and weightier with detail. But for me, the best thing it had to offer…was the characters. That’s why the EU felt so much bigger than what we saw on-screen, and why it will always be my continuity for Star Wars. They made the universe feel massive, guiding major events with their actions, embarking on journeys of redemption or self-growth, living and loving and dying, either as a stalwart protagonist or recurring villain.

What made the EU special, and what continues to provide it with its brightest luster, were its characters. The stories weaved around them, and helped shape the wider universe. The prospect of finishing ROTJ, and proceeding to “what happens next”, has never been more exciting, or fulfilling. Because I know the best stories and characters are still to come. I never tired of the post-Endor stories precisely because I loved these characters so much…and they will be the reason I keep coming back, for years to come.

To all of the authors who made this post-Endor continuity what it was—for taking Star Wars, something that was good, and making it special—you have a lot to be proud of, because you’re making new fans like me every day.

Bravo, and thank you.
Have you read much of the Old Republic-era of novels and comics? Like the Darth Bane novel or the Tales of the Jedi and KOTOR comics?
 

White Devil

Well I may be a monster, but you're gay.
kiwifarms.net
I don't know about the 80ies but by the time 2nd Edition came out in the early 90ies it was very popular in the United States.
I can't think of anything in the early 90s from the comics and books that is reminiscent of 40k. I very, very recently just went through all the early 90s Dark Horse line as well. About the ONLY thing I can think of, and it's a stretch, are Phase Zero Dark troopers.
 

LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
I can't think of anything in the early 90s from the comics and books that is reminiscent of 40k. I very, very recently just went through all the early 90s Dark Horse line as well. About the ONLY thing I can think of, and it's a stretch, are Phase Zero Dark troopers.
And those were mostly clones who went through Darth Vader-style surgeries to mitigate their advanced aging and make them combat-effective again. Often against their will.

Aside from the power armor and jump packs, there's not much similar between the two. Phase Two Dark Troopers are more like the Space Marines even if they are droids.

Imperial Rally.jpg
 

Uranus Pink

kiwifarms.net
I can't think of anything in the early 90s from the comics and books that is reminiscent of 40k. I very, very recently just went through all the early 90s Dark Horse line as well. About the ONLY thing I can think of, and it's a stretch, are Phase Zero Dark troopers.
Early 90ies would be the wrong period for any comparison between WH40K and SW. Late 90ies is starting point of when the debate of who's ripping off who kicks off, although not necessarily of WH40K and SW. GeeDubs and Blizzard butting heads being the ur example for the period.
 

LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
Early 90ies would be the wrong period for any comparison between WH40K and SW. Late 90ies is starting point of when the debate of who's ripping off who kicks off, although not necessarily of WH40K and SW. GeeDubs and Blizzard butting heads being the ur example for the period.
And the sad fact is, if GeeDubs accepted Blizzard's deal, they'd be raking in billions by now. Warcraft and Starcraft were originally meant to be Warhammer games, then GeeDubs backed out, but Blizzard, at the time still controlled by ambitious nerds instead of money-hungry suits, decided to make their Warhammer game anyways and changed a few things to avoid getting sued.

Star Wars at the time was finding itself in video games. Star Wars Rebellion, Dark Forces and Dark Forces II, Rogue Squadron, and the Super Star Wars Trilogy came out in that era of the 90s.
 

LORD IMPERATOR

kiwifarms.net
Warcraft was mostly done when GeeDubs yanked the WH license and Blizzard figured they already done most of the work and spent the money might as well reskinned and complete it.
Exactly. GeeDubs turned away what could have made them billions. At least Star Wars recognized the gaming market for its potential and really went to town with it, especially in the late 90s and the 2000s.
 

Uranus Pink

kiwifarms.net
80s Lucasfilm games were good, but they were a novelty. (ie. SW arcade games) The 90s was when they kicked things into overdrive, and they truly blossomed in the 2000s.
LF had SW games for the various home consoles throughout the 80ies laying the groundwork for the 90ies era to kick into overdrive.
 

draggs

Kyle Avgvstvs, Antifvs Maximvs. AVE KYLE
kiwifarms.net
Rainbow Vader has to be the most ironic thing I've seen in years.

For years the gays have called their enemies hateful, fascists, bigots, and all sorts of words that are synonymous with evil.

Then you have a character that for all intents and purposes started out as an evil invader-it's even in the name. Someone who kills his own subordinates, someone who has no problems killing children or watching a whole world die. A character who wields evil cosmic powers, a character who embodies, fear, wrath, and hatred. A character leading a Space Nazi faction, a character who is essentially Space Himmler. He is hateful, because he is full of hate. He counts as a fascist, because he serves a fascist empire, complete with a Dear Leader who was voted into power and who turned a loose confederacy into a strict military autocracy. He is a bigot towards Tusken Raiders, Jedi, and dissidents of all stripes who defy his master's will.

What do they do? They make him a symbol of Gay Pride.

It's like they don't even know how ironic this shit really is.
Vader was more a Space Heydrich
 

Mississippi Motorboater

Untouchable Busty Southern Belle
kiwifarms.net
Have you read much of the Old Republic-era of novels and comics? Like the Darth Bane novel or the Tales of the Jedi and KOTOR comics?
I read the KOTOR comics years ago with only a cursory knowledge of the EU, but I remember really liking them. I even managed to snag those Dark Horse Omnibus volumes for the series just before they got expensive.

Everything else, however--Dawn, Tales, SWTOR and Darth Bane--I haven't read those. But I'll be more than happy to provide my impressions of them when I get to them.

In fact, they're all up next after I tackle the Legacy comics, since that's when I'll be shifting coverage to the start of the timeline.
 

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