Tabletop Roleplaying Games (D&D, Pathfinder, CoC, ETC.) -

Yaoi Huntress Earth

My avatar is problematic.
kiwifarms.net
I'm glad that Pathfinder ended with 1st Edition. 2nd Edition is just 4th Edition made by the woke crowd. I haven't been able to salvage anything from either Paizo or from 3rd party companies. Starfinder hasn't been all that bad, but it'll probably go the same way as this.
So what exactly is so annoyingly woke about 2nd edition?
 
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Some Manajerk

kiwifarms.net
He didn't quit, it was much worse than that. Lorraine used some legal fuckery by aquiring the majority of shares and forced him out of the company he himself founded against his will.
And as i recall, they made changes to everything he had done so that he would no longer receive any royalties.


I always assumed TSR became WOTC though.
No, they bought them after the aformentioned legal fuckery drove the company into the dirt. A little after that they released 3 and 3.5, and then hasbro aquired WotC and their meddling gave us 4e.
 

Some Manajerk

kiwifarms.net
What legal fuckery gave us D&D 5th Edition?
that was Hasbro taking a hands off approach after the huge backlash from fans when 4e came out. At first it was pretty good, bringing back a lot of good stuff and getting rid of the "one a day/encounter/round" stuff that not a lot of people liked. but probably too hands off given whats coming out lately.
 
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Anonymus Fluhre

No man fears what he has seen grow
kiwifarms.net
So what exactly is so annoyingly woke about 2nd edition?
Whether you’re a player or a Game Master, participating
in a tabletop roleplaying game involves an inherent social
contract: everyone has gathered to have fun together,
and the table is a safe space for everyone. Everyone has
a right to play and enjoy Pathfinder regardless of their
age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or any other
identities and life experiences. Pathfinder is for everyone,
and Pathfinder games should be as safe, inclusive, and fun
as possible for all.

Players
As a player, it is your responsibility to ensure that you are
not creating or contributing to an environment that makes
any other players feel uncomfortable or unwelcome,
particularly if those players are members of minority
or marginalized communities that haven’t always been
welcome or represented in the larger gaming population.
Thus, it’s important to consider your character concepts and
roleplaying style and avoid any approach that could cause
harm to another player. A character whose concept and
mannerisms are racist tropes, for example, is exceptionally
harmful and works against the goal of providing fun for
all. A roleplaying style in which a player or character is
constantly interrupting others or treating certain players
or characters with condescension is similarly unacceptable.
Furthermore, standards of respect don’t vanish simply
because you’re playing a character in a fantasy game.
For example, it’s never acceptable to refer to another
person using an offensive term or a slur, and doing so
“in character” is just as bad as doing so directly. If your
character’s concept requires you act this way, that’s a good
sign your concept is harmful, and you have a responsibility
to change it. Sometimes, you might not realize that your
character concept or roleplaying style is making others
feel unwelcome at the gaming table. If another player
tells you that your character concept or roleplaying style
makes them uncomfortable, you shouldn’t argue about
what they should or shouldn’t find offensive or say that
what you’re doing is common (and therefore okay) among
players or in other media. Instead, you should simply stop
and make sure the game is a fun experience for everyone.
After all, that’s what gaming is about!

Game Masters
The role of Game Master comes with the responsibility of
ensuring that none of your players violate the game’s social
contract, especially when playing in a public space. Be on
the lookout for behavior that’s inappropriate, whether
intentional or inadvertent, and pay careful attention to
players’ body language during gameplay. If you notice
a player becoming uncomfortable, you are empowered
to pause the game, take it in a new direction, privately
check in with your players during or after the session, or
take any other action you think is appropriate to move
the game toward a fun experience for everyone. That
said, you should never let players who are uncomfortable
with different identities or experiences derail your game.
People of all identities and experiences have a right to be
represented in the game, even if they’re not necessarily
playing at your table.
Otherwise, if a player tells you they’re uncomfortable
with something in the game, whether it’s content you’ve
presented as the GM or another player’s actions, listen
to them and take steps to ensure they can once again
have fun during your game. If you’re preparing written
material and you find the description of a character or a
situation to be inappropriate, you are fully empowered
to change any details as you see fit to best suit your
players. Making sure the game is fun for everyone is your
biggest job!
That would later be put into the main core book on release page 5-6
Building a character around a specific ancestry,
background, or class can be a fun exercise in interacting
with the world’s lore. You might consider whether you’d
like to build a typical member of your character’s ancestry
or class, as described in the relevant entry, or whether
you’d prefer to play a character who defies commonly held
notions about her people. For example, you could play a
dwarf with a wide-eyed sense of wondrous innocence and
zest for change, or a performing rogue capable of amazing
acrobatic feats but with little interest in sneaking about.
Of course, you can always build a concept from any
aspect of a character’s details. You can use roleplaying
to challenge not only the norms of Pathfinder’s fictional
world, but also real-life societal norms. Your character
might challenge binary gender notions, explore cultural
identity, have a disability, have any sexual orientation, or
any combination of these suggestions. Your character can
live any life you see fit.
After you’ve figured out your character’s concept and
background, you can have some fun coming up with an
appropriate name for character!
Why would there be a binary character in a medieval fantasy setting? They haven't brought back Androids yet.


In Paizo's flawed logic, I have a right to be represented at your gaming table in some way even if I'm not playing at it.
 
Last edited:

Lackadaisy

ZA FOOL
kiwifarms.net
Whether you’re a player or a Game Master, participating
in a tabletop roleplaying game involves an inherent social
contract: everyone has gathered to have fun together,
and the table is a safe space for everyone. Everyone has
a right to play and enjoy Pathfinder regardless of their
age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or any other
identities and life experiences. Pathfinder is for everyone,
and Pathfinder games should be as safe, inclusive, and fun
as possible for all.

Players
As a player, it is your responsibility to ensure that you are
not creating or contributing to an environment that makes
any other players feel uncomfortable or unwelcome,
particularly if those players are members of minority
or marginalized communities that haven’t always been
welcome or represented in the larger gaming population.
Thus, it’s important to consider your character concepts and
roleplaying style and avoid any approach that could cause
harm to another player. A character whose concept and
mannerisms are racist tropes, for example, is exceptionally
harmful and works against the goal of providing fun for
all. A roleplaying style in which a player or character is
constantly interrupting others or treating certain players
or characters with condescension is similarly unacceptable.
Furthermore, standards of respect don’t vanish simply
because you’re playing a character in a fantasy game.
For example, it’s never acceptable to refer to another
person using an offensive term or a slur, and doing so
“in character” is just as bad as doing so directly. If your
character’s concept requires you act this way, that’s a good
sign your concept is harmful, and you have a responsibility
to change it. Sometimes, you might not realize that your
character concept or roleplaying style is making others
feel unwelcome at the gaming table. If another player
tells you that your character concept or roleplaying style
makes them uncomfortable, you shouldn’t argue about
what they should or shouldn’t find offensive or say that
what you’re doing is common (and therefore okay) among
players or in other media. Instead, you should simply stop
and make sure the game is a fun experience for everyone.
After all, that’s what gaming is about!

Game Masters
The role of Game Master comes with the responsibility of
ensuring that none of your players violate the game’s social
contract, especially when playing in a public space. Be on
the lookout for behavior that’s inappropriate, whether
intentional or inadvertent, and pay careful attention to
players’ body language during gameplay. If you notice
a player becoming uncomfortable, you are empowered
to pause the game, take it in a new direction, privately
check in with your players during or after the session, or
take any other action you think is appropriate to move
the game toward a fun experience for everyone. That
said, you should never let players who are uncomfortable
with different identities or experiences derail your game.
People of all identities and experiences have a right to be
represented in the game, even if they’re not necessarily
playing at your table.
Otherwise, if a player tells you they’re uncomfortable
with something in the game, whether it’s content you’ve
presented as the GM or another player’s actions, listen
to them and take steps to ensure they can once again
have fun during your game. If you’re preparing written
material and you find the description of a character or a
situation to be inappropriate, you are fully empowered
to change any details as you see fit to best suit your
players. Making sure the game is fun for everyone is your
biggest job!
That would later be put into the main core book on release page 5-6
Building a character around a specific ancestry,
background, or class can be a fun exercise in interacting
with the world’s lore. You might consider whether you’d
like to build a typical member of your character’s ancestry
or class, as described in the relevant entry, or whether
you’d prefer to play a character who defies commonly held
notions about her people. For example, you could play a
dwarf with a wide-eyed sense of wondrous innocence and
zest for change, or a performing rogue capable of amazing
acrobatic feats but with little interest in sneaking about.
Of course, you can always build a concept from any
aspect of a character’s details. You can use roleplaying
to challenge not only the norms of Pathfinder’s fictional
world, but also real-life societal norms. Your character
might challenge binary gender notions, explore cultural
identity, have a disability, have any sexual orientation, or
any combination of these suggestions. Your character can
live any life you see fit.
After you’ve figured out your character’s concept and
background, you can have some fun coming up with an
appropriate name for character!
Why would there be a binary character in a medieval fantasy setting? They haven't brought back Androids yet.
Who gives a shit? I have a hard time caring about fluff in RPGs because, to me, it's meant to be taken as loose recommendations/background noise for your own stories and worlds. I just throw 99% of that shit out anyways.
 

Anonymus Fluhre

No man fears what he has seen grow
kiwifarms.net
Who gives a shit? I have a hard time caring about fluff in RPGs because, to me, it's meant to be taken as loose recommendations/background noise for your own stories and worlds. I just throw 99% of that shit out anyways.
This isn't about fluff, this is about your character in the world.
I can't wait to see how they're going to change their fluff going forward though. Only worlds I ever liked were Blackmore, Greyhawk, and Forgotten Realms and that's only because I grew up playing in those settings. I prefer to make my own worlds/ lore for a bit more control. Pathfinders was okay but always felt incomplete despite all of the splash books.
 
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Adamska

Last Gunman
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Who gives a shit? I have a hard time caring about fluff in RPGs because, to me, it's meant to be taken as loose recommendations/background noise for your own stories and worlds. I just throw 99% of that shit out anyways.
I'd still much prefer to not have to sift through a book to find the stuff I'd use tho. The less chaff, the more valuable said book is.

I have pretty much never used a setting piece; I'm just opposed to wanting to have to crawl through the shit to get to the gold. It's why despite 2nd Edition Vampire the Requiem having a far better mechanical system I fucking despise having to crack it open, since the fluff for it is shit.

One affects the other to a degree.
 

Anonymus Fluhre

No man fears what he has seen grow
kiwifarms.net
Now that I think about it, why would Pathfinder change it's 3.5-eske formula to copy the much-hated 4th edition one?
Nostalgia for hate. Plus simpler mechanics for woke people who don't often play games.

I'd still much prefer to not have to sift through a book to find the stuff I'd use tho. The less chaff, the more valuable said book is.

I have pretty much never used a setting piece; I'm just opposed to wanting to have to crawl through the shit to get to the gold. It's why despite 2nd Edition Vampire the Requiem having a far better mechanical system I fucking despise having to crack it open, since the fluff for it is shit.

One affects the other to a degree.
I was never a fan of a lot of the lore in Vampire the Masquerade and preferred some of Requiem's. I prefer clan lore in Masquerade and Requiem's world lore.
 
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RomanesEuntDomus

Choke on these nuts
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
D&D is for normies anyway, so probably not.
It wasn't.
It used to be a game of nerds. But normies could join and after a pretty long time, they did in growing numbers. Then normies took over and now everything has to be dumbed down to normie-tastes, it has to appeal to normie-sensibilities and whatever happens, it may never give anyone the prickly-wicklies ever, so it has to appease the mouthbreathing idiots on Twitter, too.

I can't fault a company for trying to go for the bigger market, but this bigger market is a very fickle audience, they will move on sooner or later to the next fad and whether the core audience will come back is questionable and depends on how much damage can be reverted. Even if the game would make a full recovery, the formerly loyal fans do not deserved to be thrown under the bus.
And a couple of times, shit doesn't go as planned. The company panders to some loud-mouthed dipshits, alienates its core audience and then learns the hard way that the ones screaming their heads off on Twitter hardly ever buy the stuff they bitch about to begin with.
 

Anonymus Fluhre

No man fears what he has seen grow
kiwifarms.net
When I dug out my old D&D books a few months ago and really started going down the rabbit hole, seeing what happened to D&D, etc. it broke my damn heart. I too thought TSR became Wizards of the Coast.
I remember the day when I heard that WotC bought them out. I originally thought it was a good thing as they could help a dying brand. I was young at the time and naive. MtG and Netrunner were good games, I thought they knew what they were doing.
 
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Adamska

Last Gunman
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Why the optimism for TSR post 1e? TSR was dying for over a decade by that point and was run by a miserable cunt who treated the people who cared about the product like shit under her belt. 2e was buggy shit because Lorraine Williams hated the product and didn't want testing. Hell, Spelljammer was supposed to just be Buck Rodgers since she wanted to use the license her family had on the franchise.

There is no issue with being happy that Wizards bought them. Hell, you got at least a decade or more of good shit out of them. It's much better than the usual buy outs.

Get mad at them being stupid shits now, not what they previously did. It's a similar situation with Cuck Wendig, who also did a lot of writing for White Wolf before he became the joke he is now.
 

ZMOT

wat
kiwifarms.net
I'd still much prefer to not have to sift through a book to find the stuff I'd use tho. The less chaff, the more valuable said book is.

I have pretty much never used a setting piece; I'm just opposed to wanting to have to crawl through the shit to get to the gold. It's why despite 2nd Edition Vampire the Requiem having a far better mechanical system I fucking despise having to crack it open, since the fluff for it is shit.

One affects the other to a degree.
the 2nd ed rulebook has over 600 pages, and most of that shit from the playtest didn't even make it into the final book. that's like shitting on a system based on playtest mechanics. it's not like you have to wade though whole pages of idpol shit straight out of a gender studies course, and even then no one forces you to use the skill "smash patriarchy" with that description if you're just in it for the crunch.

there's a point when getting triggered by this shit becomes utterly retarded, might as well complain that a character can be female, because fuck feminists. and even going full 14/88 is not enough to redeem yourself from being woke once - congratulations, we're now on the level of socjus-tards.

this is the what that part says now:

Gaming Is for All

Whether you are the GM or a player, participating in a
tabletop roleplaying game includes a social contract:
everyone has gathered together to have fun telling a story.
For many, roleplaying is a way to escape the troubles of
everyday life. Be mindful of everyone at the table and what
they want out of the game, so that everyone can have fun.
When a group gathers for the first time, they should talk
about what they hope to experience at the table, as well as
any topics they want to avoid. Everyone should understand
that elements might come up that make some players feel
uncomfortable or even unwelcome, and everyone should
agree to respect those boundaries during play. That way,
everyone can enjoy the game together.
Pathfinder is a game for everyone, regardless of their age,
gender, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any
other identities and life experiences. It is the responsibility
of all of the players, not just the GM, to make sure the
table is fun and welcoming to all.

a basic bitch boilerplate disclaimer companies have been doing for years now, which is so "open" to "all" that you can run a nazi rape murderhobo campaign if your group is into that (which you always could, but hey...).

it's also funny that people who complain about this shit apparently stop right at the beginning of the very first thing they ever read in the playtest and never look at the real juicy bits. the final GM part has this:

The role of Game Master comes with the responsibility of
ensuring you and the rest of the players have a rewarding,
fun time during the game. Games can deal with difficult
subjects and have stressful moments, but fundamentally
Pathfinder is a leisure activity. It can remain so only if the
players follow the social contract and respect one another.
Players with physical or mental disabilities might find
themselves more challenged than abled players. Work
with your players to ensure they have the resources
and support they need. Additionally, be on the lookout
for behavior that’s inappropriate, whether intentional
or inadvertent, and pay careful attention to players’
body language during the game. If you notice a player
becoming uncomfortable, you are empowered to pause
the game, take it in a new direction, privately check in
with your players during or after the session, or take any
other action you think is appropriate.
If a player tells you they’re uncomfortable with
something in the game, whether it’s content you’ve
presented as the GM or another player’s or PC’s actions,
listen carefully to that player and take steps to ensure
they can once again have fun during your game. If you’re
preparing prewritten material and you find a character
or a situation inappropriate, you are fully empowered
to change any details as you see fit. You also have the
authority (and responsibility) to ask players to change
their behavior—or even leave the table—if what they’re
doing is unacceptable or makes others feel uncomfortable.
It’s never appropriate to make the person who is
uncomfortable responsible for resolving a problem. It’s
okay if mistakes happen. What’s important is how you
respond and move forward.
Gaming is for everyone. Never let those acting in bad
faith undermine your game or exclude other players. Your
efforts are part of the long-term process of making games
and game culture welcoming to all. Working together, we
can build a community where players of all identities and
experiences feel safe.

with a sidebar of

Consent and comfort are important topics for roleplaying
games, and many designers have created techniques to
help facilitate responsible play. Some methods you can use
are lines and veils, developed by Ron Edwards, and the
X-Card, developed by John Stavropoulos.

Lines and Veils
The terms “line” and “veil” can give your table a common
vocabulary for the concepts described in this section. A
line is a hard limit to the actions players might take, such
as “We’re drawing a line at torture.” The group agrees not
to cross a line and omits that content from the game.
A veil indicates something that shouldn’t be described
in detail. The scene fades to black for a veil, or the group
moves on to discuss a different topic, though whatever the
veil is drawn across still happens. For example, you might
say, “We’ll draw a veil across the scene as those characters
head into the bedroom.”
You might come up with some lines and veils in advance,
but then find more as play continues.

The X-Card
Draw an “X” on a card, and you’ve got an X-Card. Place it on
the table at the start of the session and describe its use to
the players: any player can silently reject content they find
upsetting by tapping the X-Card; whoever’s speaking then
rewinds a bit and continues on, excising the objectionable
content. As with setting the basic guidelines for your
campaign, there are no questions asked, no judgment, and
no argument when someone invokes the X-Card. You can,
however, ask for clarification if you need it, such as “How far
back should I rewind this?” Some groups instead make an
X with their hands, say “Let’s X that out,” or use some other
method. Either way, follow up with the player privately,
after the game, to see if the guidelines need to be revised.
You can find more details at tinyurl.com/x-card-rpg.

that's shit most players won't even see and still so vague that it implies at the same time you can kick out any screeching sjw-harpy if it's detrimental to your table and point them to this very section.

it's also a good reminder that most people getting their panties in a twist about this nothingburger clearly never had to deal with the worldwound incursion, and that shit came out in 2013.
 

WinchesterPremium

kiwifarms.net
the 2nd ed rulebook has over 600 pages, and most of that shit from the playtest didn't even make it into the final book. that's like shitting on a system based on playtest mechanics. it's not like you have to wade though whole pages of idpol shit straight out of a gender studies course, and even then no one forces you to use the skill "smash patriarchy" with that description if you're just in it for the crunch.

there's a point when getting triggered by this shit becomes utterly retarded, might as well complain that a character can be female, because fuck feminists. and even going full 14/88 is not enough to redeem yourself from being woke once - congratulations, we're now on the level of socjus-tards.

this is the what that part says now:

Gaming Is for All

Whether you are the GM or a player, participating in a
tabletop roleplaying game includes a social contract:
everyone has gathered together to have fun telling a story.
For many, roleplaying is a way to escape the troubles of
everyday life. Be mindful of everyone at the table and what
they want out of the game, so that everyone can have fun.
When a group gathers for the first time, they should talk
about what they hope to experience at the table, as well as
any topics they want to avoid. Everyone should understand
that elements might come up that make some players feel
uncomfortable or even unwelcome, and everyone should
agree to respect those boundaries during play. That way,
everyone can enjoy the game together.
Pathfinder is a game for everyone, regardless of their age,
gender, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any
other identities and life experiences. It is the responsibility
of all of the players, not just the GM, to make sure the
table is fun and welcoming to all.

a basic bitch boilerplate disclaimer companies have been doing for years now, which is so "open" to "all" that you can run a nazi rape murderhobo campaign if your group is into that (which you always could, but hey...).

it's also funny that people who complain about this shit apparently stop right at the beginning of the very first thing they ever read in the playtest and never look at the real juicy bits. the final GM part has this:

The role of Game Master comes with the responsibility of
ensuring you and the rest of the players have a rewarding,
fun time during the game. Games can deal with difficult
subjects and have stressful moments, but fundamentally
Pathfinder is a leisure activity. It can remain so only if the
players follow the social contract and respect one another.
Players with physical or mental disabilities might find
themselves more challenged than abled players. Work
with your players to ensure they have the resources
and support they need. Additionally, be on the lookout
for behavior that’s inappropriate, whether intentional
or inadvertent, and pay careful attention to players’
body language during the game. If you notice a player
becoming uncomfortable, you are empowered to pause
the game, take it in a new direction, privately check in
with your players during or after the session, or take any
other action you think is appropriate.
If a player tells you they’re uncomfortable with
something in the game, whether it’s content you’ve
presented as the GM or another player’s or PC’s actions,
listen carefully to that player and take steps to ensure
they can once again have fun during your game. If you’re
preparing prewritten material and you find a character
or a situation inappropriate, you are fully empowered
to change any details as you see fit. You also have the
authority (and responsibility) to ask players to change
their behavior—or even leave the table—if what they’re
doing is unacceptable or makes others feel uncomfortable.
It’s never appropriate to make the person who is
uncomfortable responsible for resolving a problem. It’s
okay if mistakes happen. What’s important is how you
respond and move forward.
Gaming is for everyone. Never let those acting in bad
faith undermine your game or exclude other players. Your
efforts are part of the long-term process of making games
and game culture welcoming to all. Working together, we
can build a community where players of all identities and
experiences feel safe.

with a sidebar of

Consent and comfort are important topics for roleplaying
games, and many designers have created techniques to
help facilitate responsible play. Some methods you can use
are lines and veils, developed by Ron Edwards, and the
X-Card, developed by John Stavropoulos.

Lines and Veils
The terms “line” and “veil” can give your table a common
vocabulary for the concepts described in this section. A
line is a hard limit to the actions players might take, such
as “We’re drawing a line at torture.” The group agrees not
to cross a line and omits that content from the game.
A veil indicates something that shouldn’t be described
in detail. The scene fades to black for a veil, or the group
moves on to discuss a different topic, though whatever the
veil is drawn across still happens. For example, you might
say, “We’ll draw a veil across the scene as those characters
head into the bedroom.”
You might come up with some lines and veils in advance,
but then find more as play continues.

The X-Card
Draw an “X” on a card, and you’ve got an X-Card. Place it on
the table at the start of the session and describe its use to
the players: any player can silently reject content they find
upsetting by tapping the X-Card; whoever’s speaking then
rewinds a bit and continues on, excising the objectionable
content. As with setting the basic guidelines for your
campaign, there are no questions asked, no judgment, and
no argument when someone invokes the X-Card. You can,
however, ask for clarification if you need it, such as “How far
back should I rewind this?” Some groups instead make an
X with their hands, say “Let’s X that out,” or use some other
method. Either way, follow up with the player privately,
after the game, to see if the guidelines need to be revised.
You can find more details at tinyurl.com/x-card-rpg.

that's shit most players won't even see and still so vague that it implies at the same time you can kick out any screeching sjw-harpy if it's detrimental to your table and point them to this very section.

it's also a good reminder that most people getting their panties in a twist about this nothingburger clearly never had to deal with the worldwound incursion, and that shit came out in 2013.
Part of leaning conservative is accepting that most media isn't going to share your politics. Nobody here is getting triggered here but you buddy. There are some genuinely good SJW type games, I'm sure we've all been in the situation where we're reading through a book and roll our eyes at one particularly stupid paragraph but we keep reading because the rest of the content is still pretty good. The person you're quoting basically said just that. They're saying "Its better to have more good stuff, but I'll reluctantly use things with bad fluff" and your response is to sperg out about how triggered they are lol.

Maybe if you picked up a better RPG you wouldn't be so cranky.
 

Adamska

Last Gunman
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Part of leaning conservative is accepting that most media isn't going to share your politics. Nobody here is getting triggered here but you buddy. There are some genuinely good SJW type games, I'm sure we've all been in the situation where we're reading through a book and roll our eyes at one particularly stupid paragraph but we keep reading because the rest of the content is still pretty good. The person you're quoting basically said just that. They're saying "Its better to have more good stuff, but I'll reluctantly use things with bad fluff" and your response is to sperg out about how triggered they are lol.

Maybe if you picked up a better RPG you wouldn't be so cranky.
Yeah, it's more that it's an inconvenience since I have to still skip through and skim through that fluff I dislike. 1e Requiem had better fluff, but far jankier mechanics, so I almost always crack open the 2e book, as much as the rushjob botched the fluff on the covenants and bloodlines.

I also didn't entirely like Modiphius' take on Alien due to using Prometheus and Covenent so often, but I'd still use it far more than the 80s TTRPG with its flow chart hell. Good and simple crunch, uneven fluff is far better than great fluff bad crunch.

Hell, I'm reading Robotic Age right now and lampooning it for the "HUMANS BAD" and bad take on how to get the BOOGALOO to fuck over the US, but I'll be extremely happy if the crunch is good. If the crunch is good, I can finally enact my dream of doing a Mega Man X game where people play as reploids right before and during Sigma's 1st Rebellion and onwards.
 
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