Community Tard Baby General (includes brain dead kids) - Fundies and their genetic Fuckups; Parents of corpses in denial

Questionable Ceviche

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Im going to PL a bit so non-Americans and women who haven’t had kids can understand the financial motivations of woo stuff. Even though it’s presented as a “upper middle class woman” thing I’ve not really found that to be the case. (Rich upper class women want all the science then go organic woo after they get a perfect healthy baby. In my experience home birth ppl are hippies, religious fundies, etc... but none have much extra money. Women who use drugs (even just smoke weed) opt for home births to avoid the standard drug testing done at hospitals.

Prenatal, delivery and newborn care are expensive in the USA. If you are flat broke Medicaid covers it, but most people with jobs don’t qualify for Medicaid. (I think you need to make less than $18k a year to qualify)

I had good insurance and a baby still cost me $12k all up, and I had no issues and was out of hospital in 24 hours. Lots of people go with home birth and less/no prenatal care because of money - not that Empath would admit that motivation. Even with insurance coverage I still had to pay $150 for each ultrasound done, I think I had like 9 because I wanted everything checked and regularly, I could have had fewer, only 2 or none if I preferred. Cost does factor into this. Given what we know about Empath I’ll guess she had no or crappy insurance so a home birth was appealing just from a cost saving perspective. If you don’t have insurance, are having a home birth and things go south you know you are looking at $100,000 bill if you head to the hospital for an emergency c-section. It’s sadly one of the reasons hesitate to go to the hospital when they should.
I cannot emphasize enough how much of the woo and crystal DIY healthcare and home birth shit is taking advantage of the desperation of lower class pregnant women who cannot access healthcare in the United States. There's a reason that so many of those essential oil herbal medicine MLM huns are women on the knife's edge of poverty. A lot of them are in a coverage gap where they make just a smidge too much to qualify for assistance programs but do not make enough to afford medical bills.

Healthcare access and affordability is very much divided along income and class lines. Having health insurance also isn't the same thing as having health care. It doesn't insulate someone from insane healthcare costs and predatory practices like balance billing. A pregnant woman may have health insurance, but that doesn't mean that she can afford to actually utilize the healthcare that the insurance supposedly covers. The "1 SIMPLE TRICK UR DR DOESN'T WANT U TO KNO!!!" marketing starts to sound really appealing to someone who needs to see a doctor but can't. The companies and people that push these worthless snake oils are the scum of the earth.
 

Blonde Bomb

when you got it, flaunt it
Verified Kiwileak
kiwifarms.net
No intervention and cheap woo was great until it backfired spectacularly, now she wants all the science and artificial life extension BS. Keep in mind they had to pay for Luna’s birth, but because she’s got a terrible disease now the govt is picking up the tab for everything.

The fact that the govt is paying for it is always a major factor in these cases. She wants all the free stuff she can get. She’s some IG woo food wannabe and her husband is a CrossFit trainer, unless there’s some rich grandparents somewhere Luna is actually a net benefit for their household income. (This is why white trash actually TRY to get their poor kids Dx with autism or other problems, they get cash if they do.)

You start getting child SSI for a infant with disabilities, so besides free health care, therapies, formula, etc...they get cash every month for Luna so looney Empath is basically getting paid to be a mommy/caregiver now. I know they said they moved to be closer to family, but Nevada pays better and bigger benefits than Indiana. This probably means mom now qualifies for Medicaid too and her next baby’s delivery will be covered by the govt. But if that means she will go to the hospital instead of opt for a cheap home birth, great.

.Im going to PL a bit so non-Americans and women who haven’t had kids can understand the financial motivations of woo stuff. Even though it’s presented as a “upper middle class woman” thing I’ve not really found that to be the case. (Rich upper class women want all the science then go organic woo after they get a perfect healthy baby. In my experience home birth ppl are hippies, religious fundies, etc... but none have much extra money. Women who use drugs (even just smoke weed) opt for home births to avoid the standard drug testing done at hospitals.

Prenatal, delivery and newborn care are expensive in the USA. If you are flat broke Medicaid covers it, but most people with jobs don’t qualify for Medicaid. (I think you need to make less than $18k a year to qualify)

I had good insurance and a baby still cost me $12k all up, and I had no issues and was out of hospital in 24 hours. Lots of people go with home birth and less/no prenatal care because of money - not that Empath would admit that motivation. Even with insurance coverage I still had to pay $150 for each ultrasound done, I think I had like 9 because I wanted everything checked and regularly, I could have had fewer, only 2 or none if I preferred. Cost does factor into this. Given what we know about Empath I’ll guess she had no or crappy insurance so a home birth was appealing just from a cost saving perspective. If you don’t have insurance, are having a home birth and things go south you know you are looking at $100,000 bill if you head to the hospital for an emergency c-section. It’s sadly one of the reasons hesitate to go to the hospital when they should.

I’ve always thought that if the crazy potato parents had to pay out of pocket for their healthcare they would use next to no intervention. No body is going to put themselves into the street to keep a husk on a ventilator for two more years, but if the govt is picking up the tab they demand ALL the interventions.

fertility stuff
Yup, I’ve know quite a few women who had children naturally in their early 40’s. A few had accident babies because they thought they didn’t have to worry about getting pregnant anymore. Whoops! But no problems, healthy, smart kids.

I’ve read plenty about younger women unable or struggling to get pregnant in their 20’s and early 30’s.

This is why they advise women to have certain tests run if they are really serious about wanting children. You’ll hear things like a 25 year old has hormone levels or eggs of a 45 year old, or a 40 year old woman’s test results in the range of the average 28 year old. It’s a real crap shoot.

But a lot of women get angry if they struggle to get pregnant at 39 and feel deceived. But they might have struggled to get pregnant at 28 too.

Older celebrities have been quite deceptive about how they managed to have children in their mid-40’s, implying it was natural and that the kids are even genetically related to them. it’s given the wrong impression to some women about the ages you can reasonably expect to have children easily.

OBGYN offices offer limited fertility treatments, just some prescriptions and such. But the real fertility industry is run by reproductive endocrinologists who’s entire practice revolves around IVF. New York, San Francisco, LA and DC tend to have the big IVF fertility centers and practices. One round of IVF round starts at around $20 to 30k. The average is 3 rounds to get pregnant.

Donor eggs have been pushed by the IVF docs because it greatly increases their “live birth rates.” When rich couples or women are trying to decide where to spend six figures to try and get pregnant they will go to the doctor with the best results. Most women doing IVF and using their own eggs tend to have lower success rates (if their eggs were good they wouldn’t need IVF, unless the problem is on the male side. Low or no sperm count is a big reason for IVF treatment too.) Donor eggs have much better success rates, so doctors tend to aggressively push them to keep their live birth ratio/stats up. I don’t personally get it because I wouldn’t want to carry the child of another woman and husband/rando. Incels are obsessed with men getting “cucked” but science now gives women the same opportunity...and they pay big money to do it.
And yet, had Luna been born with a disability, like say Autism, they'd have to jump through hoops to get any services. But because Ms. Empath fucked up, the government pays for it.
 

booklover

kiwifarms.net
Yep, I’ve experienced both. The c section (and recovery) was a fucking walk in the park compared with the natural labour, birth injury, and subsequent repair surgery. Technically I didn’t NEED a c section second time around (from a physical or baby’s health POV) but I insisted, for mental health reasons, because I was terrified of having a repeat experience of the first birth.

Frankly I don’t think there’s such a thing as an unnecessary c section. If a woman asks for one, and she fully understands the risks, then that’s a valid choice she’s making about her own body.
If you needed reconstructive surgery after your previous vaginal birth, then your later c-section was probably justified. That, I understand.
 

MirnaMinkoff

Mama, nobody sends you a turd and expects to live.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I cannot emphasize enough how much of the woo and crystal DIY healthcare and home birth shit is taking advantage of the desperation of lower class pregnant women who cannot access healthcare in the United States. There's a reason that so many of those essential oil herbal medicine MLM huns are women on the knife's edge of poverty. A lot of them are in a coverage gap where they make just a smidge too much to qualify for assistance programs but do not make enough to afford medical bills.

Healthcare access and affordability is very much divided along income and class lines. Having health insurance also isn't the same thing as having health care. It doesn't insulate someone from insane healthcare costs and predatory practices like balance billing. A pregnant woman may have health insurance, but that doesn't mean that she can afford to actually utilize the healthcare that the insurance supposedly covers. The "1 SIMPLE TRICK UR DR DOESN'T WANT U TO KNO!!!" marketing starts to sound really appealing to someone who needs to see a doctor but can't. The companies and people that push these worthless snake oils are the scum of the earth.
These are facts. If you are a working class family a home birth that costs under $1k seems a lot more attractive than a birth that ends up costing half your net annual income. Seems even better if it’s cloaked in warm and fuzzy gimmicks about Mother Nature and as god intended stuff that Gwen Paltrow totally loves! (Woo huckster Gwen Paltrow had $40k a night birthing suite in a top notch hospital and a *emergency* c-section).

The woo also sounds better and less scary, more cozy than the complex medical jargon and doctors offices which can be intimidating and confusing, esp if you are worried about what it’s all going to cost you.

There are exceptions to these things but generally home birth happens at the lower income and education brackets. Rich woo types might talk a big game online (esp if they have sponsored product lines) but they check into $30k a night birthing suites, with top notch doctors, right next to the NICU and usually have scheduled c-sections. (They ALWAYS claim it was an emergency c-section, but rarely is it.)
 

booklover

kiwifarms.net
I have not been able to find the link since I read the story, but I did read some years back about an infertility doctor who would give prospective clients a Baby Think It Over (a doll used in sex education and family living courses for teenagers, and is programmed to cry at random times and won't stop until a key is placed in its back for a certain period of time, and they have ways of finding out if people tried to circumvent it) and he was quite surprised at how many of them returned it ASAP and did not pursue further treatments.

I actually think that's a good idea. The first couple I knew personally who had successful IVF, in the mid 1990s, had to get 8 (that's right, eight) sessions of marriage counseling before their fertility specialist would proceed. Some clinics have minimum ages, usually 25, and others require that couples be married. It's their right to do this.

Some people might consider it a form of eugenics to have limits, but think about it: A doctor who cared only that the cash was green was how we ended up with the Octomom.
 

Dysnomia

Blood on the rise, it's following me
kiwifarms.net
Egg donation. All these celebs aged 45+ (Janet was 49) are using the eggs of much younger women. The chances of a successful IVF pregnancy at that age are greatly increased if they don’t use their own geriatric eggs.

I don’t believe JJ was even pregnant though. Secret surrogate all the way.
I don't either. Not sure about the secret daughter with James DeBarge. One of the rumors was that she was a tard baby and that is why she was a secret.

No intervention and cheap woo was great until it backfired spectacularly, now she wants all the science and artificial life extension BS. Keep in mind they had to pay for Luna’s birth, but because she’s got a terrible disease now the govt is picking up the tab for everything.

The fact that the govt is paying for it is always a major factor in these cases. She wants all the free stuff she can get. She’s some IG woo food wannabe and her husband is a CrossFit trainer, unless there’s some rich grandparents somewhere Luna is actually a net benefit for their household income. (This is why white trash actually TRY to get their poor kids Dx with autism or other problems, they get cash if they do.)

You start getting child SSI for a infant with disabilities, so besides free health care, therapies, formula, etc...they get cash every month for Luna so looney Empath is basically getting paid to be a mommy/caregiver now. I know they said they moved to be closer to family, but Nevada pays better and bigger benefits than Indiana. This probably means mom now qualifies for Medicaid too and her next baby’s delivery will be covered by the govt. But if that means she will go to the hospital instead of opt for a cheap home birth, great.

.Im going to PL a bit so non-Americans and women who haven’t had kids can understand the financial motivations of woo stuff. Even though it’s presented as a “upper middle class woman” thing I’ve not really found that to be the case. (Rich upper class women want all the science then go organic woo after they get a perfect healthy baby. In my experience home birth ppl are hippies, religious fundies, etc... but none have much extra money. Women who use drugs (even just smoke weed) opt for home births to avoid the standard drug testing done at hospitals.

Prenatal, delivery and newborn care are expensive in the USA. If you are flat broke Medicaid covers it, but most people with jobs don’t qualify for Medicaid. (I think you need to make less than $18k a year to qualify)

I had good insurance and a baby still cost me $12k all up, and I had no issues and was out of hospital in 24 hours. Lots of people go with home birth and less/no prenatal care because of money - not that Empath would admit that motivation. Even with insurance coverage I still had to pay $150 for each ultrasound done, I think I had like 9 because I wanted everything checked and regularly, I could have had fewer, only 2 or none if I preferred. Cost does factor into this. Given what we know about Empath I’ll guess she had no or crappy insurance so a home birth was appealing just from a cost saving perspective. If you don’t have insurance, are having a home birth and things go south you know you are looking at $100,000 bill if you head to the hospital for an emergency c-section. It’s sadly one of the reasons hesitate to go to the hospital when they should.

I’ve always thought that if the crazy potato parents had to pay out of pocket for their healthcare they would use next to no intervention. No body is going to put themselves into the street to keep a husk on a ventilator for two more years, but if the govt is picking up the tab they demand ALL the interventions.

fertility stuff
Yup, I’ve know quite a few women who had children naturally in their early 40’s. A few had accident babies because they thought they didn’t have to worry about getting pregnant anymore. Whoops! But no problems, healthy, smart kids.

I’ve read plenty about younger women unable or struggling to get pregnant in their 20’s and early 30’s.

This is why they advise women to have certain tests run if they are really serious about wanting children. You’ll hear things like a 25 year old has hormone levels or eggs of a 45 year old, or a 40 year old woman’s test results in the range of the average 28 year old. It’s a real crap shoot.

But a lot of women get angry if they struggle to get pregnant at 39 and feel deceived. But they might have struggled to get pregnant at 28 too.

Older celebrities have been quite deceptive about how they managed to have children in their mid-40’s, implying it was natural and that the kids are even genetically related to them. it’s given the wrong impression to some women about the ages you can reasonably expect to have children easily.

OBGYN offices offer limited fertility treatments, just some prescriptions and such. But the real fertility industry is run by reproductive endocrinologists who’s entire practice revolves around IVF. New York, San Francisco, LA and DC tend to have the big IVF fertility centers and practices. One round of IVF round starts at around $20 to 30k. The average is 3 rounds to get pregnant.

Donor eggs have been pushed by the IVF docs because it greatly increases their “live birth rates.” When rich couples or women are trying to decide where to spend six figures to try and get pregnant they will go to the doctor with the best results. Most women doing IVF and using their own eggs tend to have lower success rates (if their eggs were good they wouldn’t need IVF, unless the problem is on the male side. Low or no sperm count is a big reason for IVF treatment too.) Donor eggs have much better success rates, so doctors tend to aggressively push them to keep their live birth ratio/stats up. I don’t personally get it because I wouldn’t want to carry the child of another woman and husband/rando. Incels are obsessed with men getting “cucked” but science now gives women the same opportunity...and they pay big money to do it.
So that is family income. If your husband puts the household over the limit then no Medicaid.

Healthcare cost is ridiculous in the US.

At least if your genetics are fucked a donor egg/sperm can be a way to go.

But I don't buy these older celebrity women and their totally natural pregnancies most of the time. My aunt has a friend who got pregnant at 50 and was completely shocked about it happening. She thought her symptoms were menopause at first. The baby had no issues. So it happens. But Hollywood makes it look like it is as common as green grass. Sure Jan.:roll:
 

John Merston

the return and dislike
kiwifarms.net
I have not been able to find the link since I read the story, but I did read some years back about an infertility doctor who would give prospective clients a Baby Think It Over (a doll used in sex education and family living courses for teenagers, and is programmed to cry at random times and won't stop until a key is placed in its back for a certain period of time, and they have ways of finding out if people tried to circumvent it) and he was quite surprised at how many of them returned it ASAP and did not pursue further treatments.

I actually think that's a good idea. The first couple I knew personally who had successful IVF, in the mid 1990s, had to get 8 (that's right, eight) sessions of marriage counseling before their fertility specialist would proceed. Some clinics have minimum ages, usually 25, and others require that couples be married. It's their right to do this.

Some people might consider it a form of eugenics to have limits, but think about it: A doctor who cared only that the cash was green was how we ended up with the Octomom.
I agree. It annoys how pro-lifers go "think of all the couples who want children but can't have them!" when pushing adoption as an alternative to abortion. There's a difference between wanting a child and actually having the necessary qualities to care for one.
 

Free the Pedos

What the fuck's a washing machine doing in a pub?
kiwifarms.net
No intervention and cheap woo was great until it backfired spectacularly, now she wants all the science and artificial life extension BS. Keep in mind they had to pay for Luna’s birth, but because she’s got a terrible disease now the govt is picking up the tab for everything.

The fact that the govt is paying for it is always a major factor in these cases. She wants all the free stuff she can get. She’s some IG woo food wannabe and her husband is a CrossFit trainer, unless there’s some rich grandparents somewhere Luna is actually a net benefit for their household income. (This is why white trash actually TRY to get their poor kids Dx with autism or other problems, they get cash if they do.)

You start getting child SSI for a infant with disabilities, so besides free health care, therapies, formula, etc...they get cash every month for Luna so looney Empath is basically getting paid to be a mommy/caregiver now. I know they said they moved to be closer to family, but Nevada pays better and bigger benefits than Indiana. This probably means mom now qualifies for Medicaid too and her next baby’s delivery will be covered by the govt. But if that means she will go to the hospital instead of opt for a cheap home birth, great.

.Im going to PL a bit so non-Americans and women who haven’t had kids can understand the financial motivations of woo stuff. Even though it’s presented as a “upper middle class woman” thing I’ve not really found that to be the case. (Rich upper class women want all the science then go organic woo after they get a perfect healthy baby. In my experience home birth ppl are hippies, religious fundies, etc... but none have much extra money. Women who use drugs (even just smoke weed) opt for home births to avoid the standard drug testing done at hospitals.

Prenatal, delivery and newborn care are expensive in the USA. If you are flat broke Medicaid covers it, but most people with jobs don’t qualify for Medicaid. (I think you need to make less than $18k a year to qualify)

I had good insurance and a baby still cost me $12k all up, and I had no issues and was out of hospital in 24 hours. Lots of people go with home birth and less/no prenatal care because of money - not that Empath would admit that motivation. Even with insurance coverage I still had to pay $150 for each ultrasound done, I think I had like 9 because I wanted everything checked and regularly, I could have had fewer, only 2 or none if I preferred. Cost does factor into this. Given what we know about Empath I’ll guess she had no or crappy insurance so a home birth was appealing just from a cost saving perspective. If you don’t have insurance, are having a home birth and things go south you know you are looking at $100,000 bill if you head to the hospital for an emergency c-section. It’s sadly one of the reasons hesitate to go to the hospital when they should.

I’ve always thought that if the crazy potato parents had to pay out of pocket for their healthcare they would use next to no intervention. No body is going to put themselves into the street to keep a husk on a ventilator for two more years, but if the govt is picking up the tab they demand ALL the interventions.

fertility stuff
Yup, I’ve know quite a few women who had children naturally in their early 40’s. A few had accident babies because they thought they didn’t have to worry about getting pregnant anymore. Whoops! But no problems, healthy, smart kids.

I’ve read plenty about younger women unable or struggling to get pregnant in their 20’s and early 30’s.

This is why they advise women to have certain tests run if they are really serious about wanting children. You’ll hear things like a 25 year old has hormone levels or eggs of a 45 year old, or a 40 year old woman’s test results in the range of the average 28 year old. It’s a real crap shoot.

But a lot of women get angry if they struggle to get pregnant at 39 and feel deceived. But they might have struggled to get pregnant at 28 too.

Older celebrities have been quite deceptive about how they managed to have children in their mid-40’s, implying it was natural and that the kids are even genetically related to them. it’s given the wrong impression to some women about the ages you can reasonably expect to have children easily.

OBGYN offices offer limited fertility treatments, just some prescriptions and such. But the real fertility industry is run by reproductive endocrinologists who’s entire practice revolves around IVF. New York, San Francisco, LA and DC tend to have the big IVF fertility centers and practices. One round of IVF round starts at around $20 to 30k. The average is 3 rounds to get pregnant.

Donor eggs have been pushed by the IVF docs because it greatly increases their “live birth rates.” When rich couples or women are trying to decide where to spend six figures to try and get pregnant they will go to the doctor with the best results. Most women doing IVF and using their own eggs tend to have lower success rates (if their eggs were good they wouldn’t need IVF, unless the problem is on the male side. Low or no sperm count is a big reason for IVF treatment too.) Donor eggs have much better success rates, so doctors tend to aggressively push them to keep their live birth ratio/stats up. I don’t personally get it because I wouldn’t want to carry the child of another woman and husband/rando. Incels are obsessed with men getting “cucked” but science now gives women the same opportunity...and they pay big money to do it.
Your birth was $12K out of pocket? I’m not trying to be a dick, but childbirth is pretty routine so I don’t understand how that was good insurance. I’d genuinely like to hear you expand on how that cost happened. For reference, my plan charges $30 per day for the mom during a birth, and nothing for the kid.
 

MirnaMinkoff

Mama, nobody sends you a turd and expects to live.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Your birth was $12K out of pocket? I’m not trying to be a dick, but childbirth is pretty routine so I don’t understand how that was good insurance. I’d genuinely like to hear you expand on how that cost happened. For reference, my plan charges $30 per day for the mom during a birth, and nothing for the kid.
The average out of pocket cost for having a baby in the USA is $10,808.

My figure is ballpark but reflects all prenatal visits and hospital stay. My deductible was either 7 or $10,000 individual ICR now . I had no other healthcare costs besides pregnancy. I had to pay either $100 copay or 20-30 % of costs out of pocket (depending on the type of service and provider) until I hit the deductible.

I never did hit it, but got so close, like within $400 of it. The hospital got a check for nearly $6k from me. (I did opt for a private room)

The OB I wanted wasn’t one of their “preferred provider” so I paid extra there. I think $3300 was my total to him for him out of pocket for prenatal office visits, extra ultra-sounds and his delivery fee on top of regular $100 co-pays every visit because he was a specialist and “not preferred but in the network”. Had I just gone with a preferred in network OB I would have saved several thousand, but I have zero regrets there, totally worth the extra cost. I also paid for some of those new Harmony DNA tests just to rule out any chromosome issues early on instead of waiting for tests insurance covered farther along.

Oh and I remember writing a check for $900 to the anesthesiologist who did my epidural, which was the 30% cost after what insurance covered.

My nearly $12k figure comes from what I recall the figure being when we did our taxes. We had finally spent so much it qualified for a deduction. I think you have to have over $10k in medical expenses to get a deduction and we easily did. It was the first and only time that’s happened.

Accordung to my “insurance provider” the costs should have been around $7k out of pocket but I found that to be a significant under-estimate given what standard of care/testing I wanted. It actually was accurate for how much just the standard, no complication, hospital delivery cost me, but not all the care that came before it. Most people I know spent quite a bit more than their insurance plan estimated they would pay out of pocket too.
 
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vanilla_pepsi_head

Heavens to Spergatroyd!
kiwifarms.net
The average out of pocket cost for having a baby in the USA is $10,808.

My figure is ballpark but reflects all prenatal visits and hospital stay. My deductible was either 7 or $10,000 individual ICR now . I had no other healthcare costs besides pregnancy. I had to pay either $100 copay or 20-30 % of costs out of pocket (depending on the type of service) until I hit the deductible.

I never did hit it, but got so close, like within $400 of it. The hospital got a check for nearly $7k from me.

The OB I wanted wasn’t one of their “preferred provider” so I paid extra there. I think $3300 was my total to him for him out of pocket for prenatal office visits, extra ultra-sounds and his delivery fee on top of regular $100 co-pays every visit because he was a specialist and “not preferred but in the network”. Had I just gone with a preferred in network OB I would have saved several thousand, but I have zero regrets there, totally worth the extra cost.

Oh and I remember writing a check for $900 to the anesthesiologist who did my epidural, which was the 30% cost after what insurance covered.)

My insurance claimed they covered nearly $30k in hospital costs which is just fucking insane for a standard delivery.

Accordung to my “insurance provider” the costs should have been around $7k out of pocket but I found that to be a significant under-estimate given what standard of care/testing I wanted. It actually was accurate for how much just the standard, no complication, hospital delivery cost me, but not all the care that came before it. Most people I know spent quite a bit more than their insurance plan estimated they would pay out of pocket too.
Shit like this makes me so relieved to be Canadian, Jesus Christ, I knew people without insurance could get assraped but it's kind of shocking to hear about paying tens of thousands out of pocket when you're working and have fairly decent coverage. There are tard baby life-prolonging borderline torture situations here, don't get me wrong, but they are much rarer. It probably happens a lot less often because prenatal care, abortions, certain genetic tests, and birth in a hospital are all covered and pretty accessible (ambulance rides aren't outrageous either if you had a sudden major complication). But I wonder if some of it is parents being less willing to give up on a tater baby after they paid all that cash up front? I know that sounds fucked up but the human brain makes it hard to cut losses, what do you all think?
 

MirnaMinkoff

Mama, nobody sends you a turd and expects to live.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Shit like this makes me so relieved to be Canadian, Jesus Christ, I knew people without insurance could get assraped but it's kind of shocking to hear about paying tens of thousands out of pocket when you're working and have fairly decent coverage. There are tard baby life-prolonging borderline torture situations here, don't get me wrong, but they are much rarer. It probably happens a lot less often because prenatal care, abortions, certain genetic tests, and birth in a hospital are all covered and pretty accessible (ambulance rides aren't outrageous either if you had a sudden major complication). But I wonder if some of it is parents being less willing to give up on a tater baby after they paid all that cash up front? I know that sounds fucked up but the human brain makes it hard to cut losses, what do you all think?
43% of all births in the USA are covered by Medicaid (the govt) so only 57% of the births here result in out of pocket cost of any kind.

I don’t think anyone really considers out of pocket or ROI costs when it comes to potato babies though, Plenty of potato babies were free thanks to Medicaid anyway.

The fact is our govt will pay you a monthly cash sum (plus health coverage) if you have a severely disabled infant does certainly effect things. You would see very few potato babies past a few months old if the govt didn’t subsidize the cost of their care and pay SSI benefits.
 

cuddle striker

REAL MEN WASH PLATE
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Shit like this makes me so relieved to be Canadian, Jesus Christ, I knew people without insurance could get assraped but it's kind of shocking to hear about paying tens of thousands out of pocket when you're working and have fairly decent coverage. There are tard baby life-prolonging borderline torture situations here, don't get me wrong, but they are much rarer. It probably happens a lot less often because prenatal care, abortions, certain genetic tests, and birth in a hospital are all covered and pretty accessible (ambulance rides aren't outrageous either if you had a sudden major complication). But I wonder if some of it is parents being less willing to give up on a tater baby after they paid all that cash up front? I know that sounds fucked up but the human brain makes it hard to cut losses, what do you all think?
if abortion was covered and some kind of "one month aftercare" payment was given, I don't think we'd have hardly any potato babies at all.
 

Blonde Bomb

when you got it, flaunt it
Verified Kiwileak
kiwifarms.net
As someone who (briefly) worked in health insurance, every single little thing has a cost. There isn't just one large lump sum. Every time someone enters the room & does something, that's a separately billed service. Anyone who comes into the room (OB/GYN, nurses, anesthesiologist, specialists) is billed separately, for both their presence and their service. If you baby needs NICU or an incubator? That's extra. Baby need extra tests beyond the normal tests they administer after birth? Yup, that's extra. Mother's care before, during & after birth? You get the picture.

And God forbid you go into labor early and you aren't in your preferred area with an in-network doctor. I once had to take a call from a guy who's wife was 7 months pregnant with twins & she went to visit family in India (though I have no idea why you would fly such a distance at 7 months pregnant)...and went into labor early. She had two NICU babies in India and none of it was covered. Not a damn cent.

In retrospect, I can kind of see how, from a financial standpoint, the idea of a home birth could be appealing. It's probably cheaper to buy an inflatable birthing tub, hire a midwife/doula, some Enya CDs, a pack of essential oils & some candles. But personally, I'd want to have a baby in a place where if something goes wrong, I'm in a place where people are trained to deal with it.
 

LazarusOwenhart

Terrainist Shitlord!
kiwifarms.net
The average out of pocket cost for having a baby in the USA is $10,808.

My figure is ballpark but reflects all prenatal visits and hospital stay. My deductible was either 7 or $10,000 individual ICR now . I had no other healthcare costs besides pregnancy. I had to pay either $100 copay or 20-30 % of costs out of pocket (depending on the type of service and provider) until I hit the deductible.

I never did hit it, but got so close, like within $400 of it. The hospital got a check for nearly $6k from me. (I did opt for a private room)

The OB I wanted wasn’t one of their “preferred provider” so I paid extra there. I think $3300 was my total to him for him out of pocket for prenatal office visits, extra ultra-sounds and his delivery fee on top of regular $100 co-pays every visit because he was a specialist and “not preferred but in the network”. Had I just gone with a preferred in network OB I would have saved several thousand, but I have zero regrets there, totally worth the extra cost. I also paid for some of those new Harmony DNA tests just to rule out any chromosome issues early on instead of waiting for tests insurance covered farther along.

Oh and I remember writing a check for $900 to the anesthesiologist who did my epidural, which was the 30% cost after what insurance covered.

My nearly $12k figure comes from what I recall the figure being when we did our taxes. We had finally spent so much it qualified for a deduction. I think you have to have over $10k in medical expenses to get a deduction and we easily did. It was the first and only time that’s happened.

Accordung to my “insurance provider” the costs should have been around $7k out of pocket but I found that to be a significant under-estimate given what standard of care/testing I wanted. It actually was accurate for how much just the standard, no complication, hospital delivery cost me, but not all the care that came before it. Most people I know spent quite a bit more than their insurance plan estimated they would pay out of pocket too.
I blows my mind that you Americans even have to think about costs for healthcare.
 

Questionable Ceviche

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
As someone who (briefly) worked in health insurance, every single little thing has a cost. There isn't just one large lump sum. Every time someone enters the room & does something, that's a separately billed service. Anyone who comes into the room (OB/GYN, nurses, anesthesiologist, specialists) is billed separately, for both their presence and their service. If you baby needs NICU or an incubator? That's extra. Baby need extra tests beyond the normal tests they administer after birth? Yup, that's extra. Mother's care before, during & after birth? You get the picture.

And God forbid you go into labor early and you aren't in your preferred area with an in-network doctor. I once had to take a call from a guy who's wife was 7 months pregnant with twins & she went to visit family in India (though I have no idea why you would fly such a distance at 7 months pregnant)...and went into labor early. She had two NICU babies in India and none of it was covered. Not a damn cent.

In retrospect, I can kind of see how, from a financial standpoint, the idea of a home birth could be appealing. It's probably cheaper to buy an inflatable birthing tub, hire a midwife/doula, some Enya CDs, a pack of essential oils & some candles. But personally, I'd want to have a baby in a place where if something goes wrong, I'm in a place where people are trained to deal with it.
The health insurance cost for my employer increased because we had one employee who had an actual million dollar baby. The had an unexpected premature birth and then an extended stay in the NICU. The health insurance company cited it specifically as to why our rates went up.
 

LazarusOwenhart

Terrainist Shitlord!
kiwifarms.net
You won't beleive some of their price gouges. Went in for an emergency on a busy day, since my bed was in the hallway and not a room was charged extra for "an emergency overflow bed" $5000 for a bed I was in for only 30 minutes.
See over here we call that 'over capacity' and the media routinely bite at the government because at peak times there are beds in A&E department corridors. Trump loves to point at the NHS and say "Look! Look at how BAD universal healthcare is, they're protesting!" What he doesn't get is that we're so bloody spoiled with healthcare over here that we'll get shitty and scream about the pettiest little things. I know it's just because I'm British and have never had to worry about it but, like, last year I cut my hand in my garage and the wound went a bit gooey. I went to my doctor, I got given some antibiotics which I took and it went away. I paid £9.20 for the drugs. That was it. I can't imagine being on the hook for thousands of dollars over something so trivial.
 

MirnaMinkoff

Mama, nobody sends you a turd and expects to live.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
As someone who (briefly) worked in health insurance, every single little thing has a cost. There isn't just one large lump sum. Every time someone enters the room & does something, that's a separately billed service. Anyone who comes into the room (OB/GYN, nurses, anesthesiologist, specialists) is billed separately, for both their presence and their service. If you baby needs NICU or an incubator? That's extra. Baby need extra tests beyond the normal tests they administer after birth? Yup, that's extra. Mother's care before, during & after birth? You get the picture.

And God forbid you go into labor early and you aren't in your preferred area with an in-network doctor. I once had to take a call from a guy who's wife was 7 months pregnant with twins & she went to visit family in India (though I have no idea why you would fly such a distance at 7 months pregnant)...and went into labor early. She had two NICU babies in India and none of it was covered. Not a damn cent.

In retrospect, I can kind of see how, from a financial standpoint, the idea of a home birth could be appealing. It's probably cheaper to buy an inflatable birthing tub, hire a midwife/doula, some Enya CDs, a pack of essential oils & some candles. But personally, I'd want to have a baby in a place where if something goes wrong, I'm in a place where people are trained to deal with it.
Yup, we got a line item break down from the hospital on charges just because we were curious. $16 for the shittest tube of chapstick I’ve ever used.

You don’t even have to buy an inflatable tub for a home birth, they rent them. Costs about $120. A mid-wife will run you about $1000-$2 but most of these shady home birth places have “medical loan” financing options similar to used car lots for bad credit risks.

Many Midwives aren’t insured because some states don’t recognize them as practitioners and no insurance companies will cover home birth deliveries, period.

Having no insurance liability coverage helps keep costs down but if your midwife fucks everything up and you end up with a dead baby, or one like Luna, you have almost no legal recourse unless you want to sue her to take her 2015 Prius.

Luna was the result of a stupid mother and inept midwife, but Luna and American tax payers are the ones on the hook for their negligence and stupidity. Honestly, the money doesn’t even bother me, but the life it deprived Luna of is a staggering tragedy. Has Mrs Empath ever mentioned her midwife or doula? I’m just curious who it was and how that played out once it was obvious Luna’s brain was the result of a birth injury due to negligence. Empath has been very silent on the matter afaik.

(Had that negligence happened in a hospital Ms Empath would have gotten tens of millions of dollars from a lawsuit settlement plus all of Luna’s medical care covered for life but there’s almost no chance that would have ever happened in a hospital. No medical professionals would have allowed a labor to stop progressing for that long without intervening.)

You won't beleive some of their price gouges. Went in for an emergency on a busy day, since my bed was in the hallway and not a room was charged extra for "an emergency overflow bed" $5000 for a bed I was in for only 30 minutes.
Yes, a friend of mine had a healthy, but very premature baby (29 weeks) the month in the NICU was close to a million. Can you imagine how much all the long surviving potato babies cost? Almost all require long NICU stays and then need stuff like feeding and breathing tubes and endless (useless) therapies, equipment and surgeries.

The parents of baby Matthew converted a very large garage into their own personal NICU unit but they are in South Africa. If Matthew was in the USA he’d probably have cost taxpayers about 25 million after six years