That Metal Thread -

RichardMongler

kiwifarms.net
Sheesh, no new posts in months? What's wrong with you people?

Anyway, let's talk about Sludge Metal, perhaps one of the more misunderstood genres no thanks to the deluge of Prog and Post-Metal influenced bands like Isis, Mouth of the Architect, Pelican, Kylesa, Mastodon and Neurosis which are collectively referred to as Atmospheric Sludge Metal. In truth, most of these barely qualify as Metal, much less Sludge.

To keep it simplified, Sludge = "Vol. 4" + "Saint Vitus" + "My War" + "Hear Nothing, See Nothing, Say Nothing". Add the piercing feedback, shrill vocalist and downtuned guitar for completion's sake.

The essential Sludge releases:
Eyehategod - In the Name of Suffering
Toadliquor - Feel My Hate - The Power Is the Weight - R.I.P. Cain (reissued as "The Hortator's Lament")
Dystopia - Human = Garbage
Grief - Dismal
Noothgrush - Erode the Person

For the sake of argument, we can include "Our Problem" by Iron Monkey:

These albums have the requisite pacing, atmosphere and tone. If you're not being boiled alive in malevolent riffs over a steady stream of misanthropic, hateful lyrics, then you're not playing Sludge.

I've heard lots of arguments that Melvins was the first Sludge Metal band, but that's a complete fallacy to me. Their music is a mix of Grunge and Stoner Rock with hints of Doom Metal, Punk and Hard Rock, but the Hardcore influence is way too minor for the band to be anything like Sludge. Melvins's biggest influence (that is, the B-side to Black Flag's "My War") simply lacks all the necessary elements to be a Sludge album, no matter how important to the genre's development it is.

Even Iron Monkey, a band so much closer, lacks the necessary Hardcore influence. "Iron Monkey" and "Our Problem" are amalgamations of downtuned "Vol. 4" riffs played faster with intermittent feedback and an incomprehensible yet talented vocalist whose aggression alone carries the tunes. For simplicity's sake, they're Sludge since "Extreme Doom" doesn't exist.

Another aggravating tendency among supposed Sludge listeners is the tendency to lump various Southern Metal bands into the category solely on the basis of geography; looking at you, Acid Bath. No, aggressive metallicized Southern Rock doesn't make a band Sludge. Corrosion of Conformity, Buzzov•en, Bongripper and Weedeater are not Sludge bands.

Weedeater is often listed as Stoner or Sludge, but they are far from both in spite of the downtuned guitars. Though they may often feature marijuana as a lyrical theme, lyrics do not a band make. The riffing is wholly unlike typical Stoner Metal riffing as far as rhythm and phrasing go. Moreover, they feature no Doom Metal riffing nor any Hardcore riffs, so clearly they're not Sludge. Weedeater's riffs are almost entirely Blues based and sound like a Metal version of bands like Black Oak and Lynyrd Skynyrd. In fact, they're a Southern Metal band in a truer sense of the word than tripe like Alabama Thunderpussy or Texas Hippie Coalition.

I don't really consider Acid Bath to be Sludge since they lack the necessary attributes compositionally and aesthetically. A few swears removed and you could hear them on the radio. They're Alt-Metal at most, and they could even be considered Nu-Metal at other times. Mike Sanchez once said, "Our music is commercial in an extreme sense. We need more airplay. To the kids out there listening to NIN, Korn, Tool, Black Sabbath, Ministry, and The Deftones, if you haven't heard Acid Bath then you're still in for a beating." I like how he lumps his band in with them.

In plain terms, their stuff is a mix of Alt-Rock, Doom aesthetics, Southern and Stoner Rock, with some some Groove Metal and Grind riffs thrown in. The riffs cycle through Stoner/Southern riffs, a few Grind streaks, and some slow riffs. All of Sludge's defining characteristics are missing save the bluesy sections which is always present due to the Sabbathian influence; might as well call every Sabbathian Metal band Doom which is a fallacy since Sabbath was never a fully fledged Doom band even under Ozzy. In fact, "Paegan Terrorism Tactics" is a very "happy" album. The uptempo riffs eagerly hands you a smiley sticker once you turn the album on. The few exceptions are simply moody and mellow, not of thunderous impending doom. It can be incredibly catchy at times, causing you to hum a riff or two in your head or to shout "DYING FELT SO GODDAMN GOOD TODAY!".

Another important thing: most songs on "Paegan Terrorism Tactics" follow a verse-chorus structure, a feature that underscores my refusal to deem Acid Bath to be a Sludge band. While other songs don't adhere to that format (in all fairness), they're few and far between.
 

RichardMongler

kiwifarms.net
It's no secret plenty of Thrash bands took influence from Hardcore Punk despite the initial tensions between Punks and Heshers. Slayer's "Undisputed Attitude" attests to this along with other major players in the Big Four doing covers of Punk songs. Conversely, plenty of Hardcore Punk bands controversially opted for a more aggressive, Metal-influenced sound as the '80s progressed. Corrosion of Conformity, Suicidal Tendencies, Cryptic Slaughter, D.R.I., Dr. Know, The Crucified and countless others would eventually transition from Hardcore Punk to Metal.

Meanwhile, New York's own Hardcore scene had plenty of Metal-influenced bands emerging from the outset, not the least of which included Carnivore, Cro-Mags, S.O.D., Agnostic Front, Merauder, Ludichrist, Helmet, Life of Agony, Pro-Pain, All Out War, Leeway and Biohazard. These bands would continue to define New York's scene throughout the '80s and continue into the '90s. It is in the Northeast the controversial style known as Metalcore would develop.

Personally, I prefer Crossover Thrash to Metalcore. Not only do the riffs have more power and aggression, the vocalists usually aren't total wusses. Without further ado, here are some of my favorite Crossover Thrash albums:
 
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RichardMongler

kiwifarms.net
Until the mid-2000s, Doom Metal was perhaps the least noticed of Heavy Metal's subgenres in spite of two decades worth of mindblowing albums. An unfortunate consequence of this collective intrigue in forgotten Metal records from decades ago came this overzealous labeling of heavier psychedelic bands as Doom Metal. This includes the ever so prevalent fallacy of "70s Doom" propagated by insolent music journalists and clever record distros who saw the perfect opportunity to move product. Simply put: no active, touring and/or recording Doom bands existed in the '70s. Despite Black Sabbath's influence on Metal and especially Doom Metal, the band never was a full-fledged Doom band. One could even argue they weren't a Metal band until "Master of Reality", but that's another topic altogether. Pentagram's early material tinkered with Hard Rock, Psychedelic Rock and Heavy Metal, and Bedemon's demos never reached a wider audience until they were bootlegged in the '80s.

Doom Metal proper started in the '80s, a decade that bequeathed Tyrant (who later became Saint Vitus), Trouble, Death Row/Pentagram, Candlemass, Cirith Ungol, Witchfinder General and Pagan Altar. These bands can be safely considered the origin of Doom Metal. The few obscure "Doom" bands (besides those affiliated with Candlemass and Iron Man) people name drop from the '70s lack so many of the qualities seen in the bigger bands.

So what is Doom Metal, you ask? This is perhaps the best explanation for the genre I've heard:
Imagine Black Sabbath's career were moving chronologically backwards. Let's start in the 70s here so we don't have to go through their entire back catalogue. Imagine "Vol. 4" was Black Sabbath's first album. Then "Master of Reality" is their second, "Paranoid" their third, and then the self-titled album is their fourth. Now imagine that the band Earth never existed, and instead of following up their now fourth album with whatever blues type of music Earth played you take the backwards development of the Black Sabbath style and spin it further into the unknown. Muddier, more inchoate, more protozoic and somewhat creepier with each passing album. Then, when you followed that backwards movement all the way to the eighth album (being some time in 1962 or so), you've arrived at Saint Vitus. All their influences reverse engineered to a form that would have existed in the early 1960s if heavy metal and doom metal had not evolved from rock music but came into being at zero metalness (but nothing else either) in 1950 and slowly but steadily grew more and more in metal content (without rock music or blues or any other form of music ever having any influence).
 

RichardMongler

kiwifarms.net
I know this is an old ass post but I LOVE The Gathering and I can sing most of their songs. Mandylion is great but I think How to Measure a Planet? ended up being my favorite. You posted great stuff in the Goth thread too, so damn, you have excellent taste!
Thanks.

Metal and Punk music are my biggest passions, so tis nice to see you recognizing my obvious enthusiasm.

Also, to the active users here, fix your goddamn links. The first five pages are a wasteland of busted embeds.
 
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Jerri's Kid

Moist as a snack cake.
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Daemonarch "Hermeticum" is sort of a one-off album from Moonspell but I'm rather fond of it. By the way, the lead singer of Moonspell smells really good. He passed me on the way to the backstage and I was like, wow that's some good cologne.


 

RichardMongler

kiwifarms.net
Daemonarch "Hermeticum" is sort of a one-off album from Moonspell but I'm rather fond of it. By the way, the lead singer of Moonspell smells really good. He passed me on the way to the backstage and I was like, wow that's some good cologne.


You at all familiar with the band RaHoWa? They sound like the WN fusion of Type O Negative and Moonspell.

Bridging revolutionary appeal with reactionary principles, George Burdi played an instrumental role continuing the far-right's counterculture with Resistance Records. Although pining for revolution, white nationalism's influential elders remained stolidly skeptical of Rock 'n' Roll's role for its youth. Those reservations were further compounded when skinhead thuggery courted damning press and legal scrutiny. To them, such music served no other purpose than to further misguide youthful energy towards self-destruction, and their concerns were far from unfounded. From the 1980s to the early 1990s, the angry white young'un's music of choice closely correlated with skinhead subculture; rocking against communism meant playing skinhead Oi or Hardcore Punk. Some even tinkered with Ska music in connection to skinhead subculture. RaHoWa entered the scene much like their peers, playing Rock 'n' Roll-inspired Oi, engaging in streetfights with their avowed enemies and facing assault convictions. They were crude, loutish and hardly different from the hoodrats they despised.​

Nearly two years later, Burdi reinvented his band's image from muscled-headed übermenschen to soft-spoken, introspective intellectuals foretelling grim prospects for their race. Tempering their racially-charged aggression, they now composed music solemnly contemplating their cause, its trials, tribulations and existential crises. In two separate interviews, Burdi lamented the debut's inconsistency, citing that it suffered from a lack of cohesive songwriting, so he felt it imperative to evolve lest they face stagnation. The band was fully aware they might alienate core members of the scene, but feeling the milieu of Oi!, Hard Rock and Hardcore Punk within RAC played themselves out, their effort to gain respectability from a broader audience culminated in a magnum opus still championed by that very scene to this day.

Having listened to a breadth of white power's musical output from its inception to the present, I think it's obvious why the scene hail this as a masterpiece, although I initially had a hell of a time making anything of it. Overtime, I came to appreciate it for its merits, because no shopworn superlative encapsulates the album's memorability and unique spirit. I'm certain you've heard friends enthusiastically describe some band experimenting with different instrumentation or themes as “unique” that ultimately sounds contrived, listless or haphazard, but no one else within this political fringe has since taken Cult of the Holy War's mantle as the angry white man's answer to Type O Negative. The funereal melodies, gloomy keyboards, gritty riffs and foreboding lyrics altogether craft a palpably tense and pervasively chilling atmosphere unhindered by Burdi's quivering mumble and hackneyed songwriting. Apparently taking cues from Poledouris, some tracks serve as preludes reminiscent of a high fantasy epic which competently set ominous moods.

By Burdi's own admission, Type O Negative and Moonspell inspired much of their songs, but despite the obvious derivation, the compositions still manage to sound fresh. Much of RaHoWa's talent stems from their abilities to write strong anthems, and “Man Against Time” is an outstanding example of their craft. The song is full of powerful, catchy mid-tempo riffs, compelling progressions and an unmistakable gang chorus which leaves a lasting impression well after the album is over. “Hall of the Heroes” continues what the opener established at a slower tempo and introduces some great harmonies quite reminiscent of the album Bloody Kisses. “The Last Battalion” rumbles along before enveloping you in its haunting Gregorian chant chorus. The chord progression here is much simpler yet just as engaging. And then comes “God Is Dead”, channeling the spirit of Ragnar Redbeard (Nietzsche, my ass, George) with its marching beat percussion and haunting synths. The song succeeds on account of its hooks and quotable lyrics, both which redeem Burdi hitting sour notes and the cheesy harpsichord after the third verse.

In spite of Burdi's trouble staying on key, he's still capable of delivering an evocative performance as a singer. “In the Fires of 1945” highlights his ability to channel his deep, profound sorrow through his melancholic lyrics. The song is particularly poignant because Burdi sounds the most natural. Even when he's a bit shaky, he never loses you. At times, you're left wondering how well the album could've turned out if he abandoned the Peter Steele impersonation. The cover of “The Snow Fell” similarly feels from the heart, aided and abetted by the tasteful musical arrangement.

Make no mistake. The band's strengths are easily beset by some significant flaws. As with the aphorism “Too many cooks spoil the brew,” RaHoWa introduced far too many ideas for their own good, and they seem to confuse mastery with throwing as many themes in as possible. Because of the loosely incorporated breadth of ideas, some songs were noticeably given greater priority than others. “RaHoWa” is particularly frustrating, because the mid section of the song is great. After some acoustic meandering for a little more than a minute and a half, the electric guitars thunderously enter with that signature crunch. Picking up the tempo, the band treats us to some infectious soloing with time-tested riffage guaranteed to provoke headbanging. After that burst of energy comes the anticlimactic conclusion, where the band reverts to that meandering acoustic section heard in the first two minutes. It's like they ran out of ideas and played it safe.

In other places, the low production values critically hinder the impact of any given song. What should've been a fitting tribute to Ragnar Redbeard's masterpiece feels like a haphazard mess. The mood-setting progressions on “Might Is Right” bolds to a thrashy climax beset by clumsy percussion, poor mixing and a horrid mess of a guitar tone no thanks to the production; hard to appreciate the musicianship when the drums and vocals drown out the guitar.

RaHoWa was no stranger to sentimental, emotionally charged ballads, but pathos becomes bathos on “When America Goes Down”. The blame rests on Burdi's quivering performance, maudlin lyrics, gimpy acoustics and palpably artificial synths further compounded by misplaced backing vocals and terrible straining to sound intense. Often considered the band's signature song attested to by nationalist pop star Saga's cover, “Ode to a Dying People” hardly surpasses its most dreadful number. The lyrics here are tolerably sappy and the hooks are admittedly catchy, but like its drippy cousin, gimpy acoustics and melodrama drag it down in its exercise in self-pity.

With the stirring anthems, inspiration and vision, “Cult of the Holy War” forged a path which no other band from their niche has since taken up the mantle. So in spite of all this, why such a low rating? While it succeeds where the debut failed, its advantage is its atmosphere, and although unique, the songs simply cannot compare to their idols. The musicians' collective talents only had so much mileage. The production certainly didn't help, and more often than can reasonably be considered acceptable, several songs fell flat on their ass. It's still a fine album, but not one you'd want to keep revisiting.

 
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Jerri's Kid

Moist as a snack cake.
kiwifarms.net
You at all familiar with the band RaHoWa? They sound like the WN fusion of Type O Negative and Moonspell.​
No I am not familiar with them because I haven't kept up with the times, but I like the sample you posted. I have a couple of Type O Negative and Moonspell albums so this is up my alley.
 
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Judge Holden

Corpsefucker
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Ok chaps I would like some advice.

I am currently re-assembling my old 13x13+13 metal playlist* and updating it with the times. Out of the 13 bands I have one spot left open and have to select one of three shortlisted bands for it. Opeth, Mastodon, and Gojira.*

Whom do I choose?

The ones not chosen will be represented with my favourite song of theirs on the playlist, but who do yall think should have 13 of their best on the playlist?

*13 of my favourite metal songs from 13 of my favourite metal bands, each representing a specific aspect of the genre, and 13 assorted songs from other metal bands, with the end result being a playlist I can start as I wake up in the morning and only stops playing when I fall asleep. I came up with this totally-not-13-year-old-edgelord concept many years ago while drunk playing doom and make no apology even if most the bands featured are either normie or boomer.
** Reason for this is that each of the 13 band slots covers what I see as a different genre/era of metal and I need a vaguely modern prog metal for the list.
 
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Mr. A. L. Mao

Has the inclinations to...mount women
kiwifarms.net
Ok chaps I would like some advice.

I am currently re-assembling my old 13x13+13 metal playlist* and updating it with the times. Out of the 13 bands I have one spot left open and have to select one of three shortlisted bands for it. Opeth, Mastodon, and Gojira.*

Whom do I choose?

The ones not chosen will be represented with my favourite song of theirs on the playlist, but who do yall think should have 13 of their best on the playlist?

*13 of my favourite metal songs from 13 of my favourite metal bands, each representing a specific aspect of the genre, and 13 assorted songs from other metal bands, with the end result being a playlist I can start as I wake up in the morning and only stops playing when I fall asleep. I came up with this totally-not-13-year-old-edgelord concept many years ago while drunk playing doom and make no apology even if most the bands featured are either normie or boomer.
** Reason for this is that each of the 13 band slots covers what I see as a different genre/era of metal and I need a vaguely modern prog metal for the list.
I'm not terribly familiar with opeth and know nothing about gojira, so I'd go with Mastodon.
March of the fire ants
Trainwreck
Blood and thunder
Aqua dementia
The wolf is loose
Sleeping giant
Capillarian crest
Circle of cysquatch
The last Baron
Curl of the burl
The sparrow
Ember city
Toe to toes

And the opeth song:

Please post the playlist when it's finished :)
 

Judge Holden

Corpsefucker
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I'm not terribly familiar with opeth and know nothing about gojira, so I'd go with Mastodon.
March of the fire ants
Trainwreck
Blood and thunder
Aqua dementia
The wolf is loose
Sleeping giant
Capillarian crest
Circle of cysquatch
The last Baron
Curl of the burl
The sparrow
Ember city
Toe to toes

And the opeth song:

Please post the playlist when it's finished :)
After some deliberation I decided that while I like Opeth a great deal, Mastodon would gel better with the rest of the playlist* so Im going with your suggestion. Also im increasing the format from 13x13+13 to 14x14+14 because I wanted a dedicated black metal slot rather than a small compilation in the +13 section**

As for the playlist itself, it aint really anything special and its pretty much just the ultimate normie metal compilation rather than some specially curated masterset supervised by a hundred grizzled metalheads or anything. Honestly I just wanted something i could plug in indefinitely during work/travel/excercise/cooking/whatever and enjoy every song I listened to without things getting too repetetive.

But either way, here is the current prototype build*** of my 14x14+14 playlist, clocking in at over 20 and a half hours, and covering most of the major areas of Metal.
black sabbath
the wizard
NIB
war pigs
iron man
Electric Funeral
paranoid
sweet leaf
children of the grave
supernaut
snowblind
sabbath bloody sabbath
symptom of the universe
heaven and hell

holy diver
dont talk to strangers
rainbow in the dark
Straight Through The Heart
we rock
last in line
egypt
sacred heart
rock n roll children
all the fools sailed away
dream evil
lock up the wolves
fever dreams
killing the dragon

Suicide Solution
I dont know
Crazy Train
Mr. Crowley
Diary of a Madman
S.A.T.O
Over the Mountain
Flying High Again
Bark at the Moon
Shot in the Dark
Miracle Man
Mama im coming home
No More Tears
Let me Hear You Scream

wrathchild
hallowed be thy name
run to the hills
number of the beast
flight of icarus
the trooper
powerslave
rime of the ancient mariner
aces high
2 minutes to midnight
wasted years
seventh son of a seventh son
The Evil that Men Do
fear of the dark

victim of changes
hell bent for leather
beyond the realms of life and death
living after midnight
breaking the law
screaming for vengeance
electric eye
youve got another thing coming
heading out on the highway
the sentinel
freewheel burning
turbo lover
painkiller
Touch of Evil

wake up dead
the conjuring
peace sells
good mourning black friday
in my darkest hour
hangar 18
Five Magics
Holy Wars... The Punishment Due
tornado of souls
symphony of destruction
sweating bullets
ashes in your mouth
a tout le monde
trust

the four horsemen
Seek & Destroy
for whom the bell tolls
Ride the Lightning
Creeping Death
Fade to Black
Battery
Master of Puppets
Orion
Welcome Home (Sanitarium)
Blackened
One
Enter Sandman
Nothing Else Matters

Domination
Cowboys from Hell
Cemetary Gates
Mouth for War
Walk
Fucking Hostile
Hollow
A New Level
This Love
Becoming
Im Broken
5 minutes alone
Suicide Note
Floods

Black Magic
Chemical Warfare
Hell Awaits
At Dawn they Sleep
Angel of Death
Raining Blood
Postmortem
mandatory suicide
south of heaven
seasons in the abyss
war ensamble
dead skin mask
Skeletons Of Society
Disciple

Sober
Stinkfist
Aenema
Pushit
42 and 6
Third Eye
The Grudge
Schism
Parabol
Lateralus
Ticks & Leeches
Wings for Marie
Vicarious
The Pot

Zombie Ritual
Pull the Plug
Leprousy
Lack of Comprehension
Suicide Machine
The Philosopher
Trapped in a Corner
Symbolic
1000 Eyes
Without Judgement
Empty Words
Crystal Mountain
Flesh and the Power it holds
Spirit Crusher

Motorhead
Overkill
No Class
Damage Case
Bomber
Stone Dead Forever
We are the Road Crew
Ace of Spades
Iron Fist
Dancing on your Grave
Killed by Death
Orgasmatron
Hellraiser
Born to Raise Hell

March of the Fire Ants
Blood and Thunder
Megalodon
Aqua Dementia
Hearts Alive
The Wolf Is Loose
Colony of Birchmen
Sleeping Giant
The Czar
Oblivion
The Last Baron
Crack the Skye
Call of the Burl
Motherload

Venom - Black Metal
Mercyful Fate - The Oath
Emperor - We Are the Black Wizards
Emperor - Inno A Satana
Emperor - Into The Infinity Of Thoughts
Bathory - Enter the Eternal Fire
Bathory - A Fine Day to Die
Bathory - Blood Fire Death
Mayhem - Freezing Moon
Mayhem - Funeral Fog
Mayhem - De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas
Burzum - Det Som en Gang Var
Burzum - Dunkelheit
Burzum - Jesu dod
****

Rainbow - Stargazer (Heavy Metal)
Diamond Head - Am I Evil (Heavy Metal)
Helloween - Halloween (Power Metal)
Sepultura - Roots Bloody Roots (Groove/Latin Metal)
Opeth - Blackwater Park (Progressive Metal)
System of a Down - Toxicity (Alternate Metal)
Gojira - Flying Whales (Progressive Metal)
Anthrax - In the End (Thrash Metal)
Dream Theater - Pull Me Under (Progressive Metal)
Avenged Sevenfold - Afterlife (Symphonic Metal)
Accept - Fast as a Shark (Speed Metal)
Queensryche - Eyes of a Stranger (Progressive Metal)
Behemoth - The Satanist (Death Metal)
Lamb of God - Laid to Rest (Groove Metal)

The TLDR version of this unwieldly behemoth would probably be the following selection of my personal favourite songs from each group/category that clocks in at a bit over one and a half hours
Black Sabbath - Sabbath Bloody Sabbath
Dio - Rainbow in the Dark
Ozzy - Diary of a Madman
Iron Maiden - Rime of the Ancient Mariner
Judas Priest - You've got Another Thing Coming
Megadeth - Hangar 18
Metallica - Enter Sandman
Pantera - Cemetary Gates
Slayer - Dead skin Mask
Tool - Schism
Death - Flesh and the Power it Holds
Motorhead - Orgasmatron
Mastodon - March of the Fire Ants
Black Metal - Burzum - Dunkelheit
14 More - Gojira - Flying Whales

I am also aware that quite a few subgenres were left out of the mix such as Industrial Metal, Symphonic Metal, Metalcore, Nu Metal, Viking Metal, Gothic Metal, and others but I havent really listened to these genres as much, and so didnt really want to throw what little I had listened to before into the mix. Im thinking of making a smaller xpac playlist for them once I have listened to enough of each, maybe throw in some Kawaii metal just for shits and giggles.

*Opeth is a little too heavy on prolongued accoustic stretches to have 14 songs on this playlist IMO. Not a criticism of the music just a thematic playlist issue more than anything
** If you want to get back some edgelord points just pretend the 14 stands for the 14 words or for Satan and his 13 disciples or whatever the fuck sounds most fittingly autistic
*** Odds are it will have entirely changed once again by this time tomorrow
**** If you are wondering why Black Metal is a compilation of different groups rather than the best of a single group, honestly I just could not justify removing some of my favourite songs just to have a wholesale bathory/burzum/mayhem/emperor block.
 
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Judge Holden

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Ah crap, now im hooked on black metal again after going through various songs and albums for the playlist. Figures since its been almost half a decade since I seriously listened to much of it.
 

Douglas Reynholm

kiwifarms.net
I am currently re-assembling my old 13x13+13 metal playlist* and updating it with the times. Out of the 13 bands I have one spot left open and have to select one of three shortlisted bands for it. Opeth, Mastodon, and Gojira.
Never been into metal other than a long time love of Slipknot and Red Fang, but came across a few Mastodon tracks like 'Motherload' and 'High Road' that I can't get enough of. Couldn't get into Gojira, any recommendations for a part-timer?
 

Judge Holden

Corpsefucker
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Never been into metal other than a long time love of Slipknot and Red Fang, but came across a few Mastodon tracks like 'Motherload' and 'High Road' that I can't get enough of. Couldn't get into Gojira, any recommendations for a part-timer?
The album From Mars to Sirius is where I started off and is still probably their best album, my personal favs being Flying Whales/Heaviest Matter in the Universe/Backbone but The Way of All Flesh has some of their better songs as well, especially The Art of Dying.
 

King Buzzo

I'm starboard to nowhere on the Milky Way
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Never been into metal other than a long time love of Slipknot and Red Fang, but came across a few Mastodon tracks like 'Motherload' and 'High Road' that I can't get enough of. Couldn't get into Gojira, any recommendations for a part-timer?
You can also give Magma a listen. It's their most accessible album (although not their best) then ease your way through the rest of the discography by following @Judge Holden's advice.
 
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