The End of Tik Tok? What comes next? - India bans, Trump looking to as well.

Quoookie

kiwifarms.net
Up until I got back on certain sites a few months back I never even had heard of TIK Tok sure most will recover losing this and if they can just kill themselves. Simple. Nothing ever complicated like a middle of the night shit and every toilet backed up and can't even get outside because one is too fucked up to figured out the security shit...or simple locks to shit outside so one has to poops a few loads on a five hundred dollar or so rug. Now thats complicated.
 
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Aberforth

Straight A student in special ed.
kiwifarms.net
Facebook made another competitor to capitalize on this called Instagram Reels. It's only in India for now.

Tiktok has become strangely popular with middle aged women. Probably because of quarantine.
 

Coffee Shits

Hardcore
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I'm not sure how tiktok is different on a practical level from thousands of other apps that will sell their data to anybody with a dollar.
The contention may lie in its medium since it's a video/audio platform instead of a text-based one. It's easy to accidentally record something that you shouldn't, especially if you're toying with the options for minutes while the camera rolls. Real-time automated detection of interesting content is getting easier and easier and you can bet China is acting as a legal wiretap on every user. The Navy banned it in December and I'm assuming that's why. https://www.theguardian.com/technol...ile-devices-saying-its-a-cybersecurity-threat (Archive)
 
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-4ZURE-

Kill Every Last One of Them!
kiwifarms.net
View attachment 1442186

Normies have been ruining the internet WAAAAAAAAY before TikTok was even a thing.

View attachment 1442194
Normies have always been around, Tik Tok was a platform that rounded them up, kept them in one location so to speak. Without it, they will likely just go or go back to polluting places like YouTube.
Never meant to imply they were never a thing prior to Tik Tok.

It sets the precedent for more borders and further tribalization and centralization of the net. If Tik Tok can be killed without raising a fuss, what's next? How long before all sites have to be either based in or approved by a country to be accessible from it? How long before VPNs are banned or regulated into obsolesence?
This is actually a disturbing thought. While I understand and kinda agree with the Tik Tok ban given the state of China right now, it is scary to think where this may go in the future and is worth discussion in its own right.
Also, I heard India banned VPNS for Tik Tok, so that is a real concern.

Tiktok has become strangely popular with middle aged women. Probably because of quarantine.
It always has been. Even when it was musically, many older women used it. I am guessing it is a vying for attention in their old age. Many are on the bigger side, and are not the most attractive so to speak. There were also a lot of older dudes, probably looking to hook up with 13 year olds on the app, one even get caught.

Facebook made another competitor to capitalize on this called Instagram Reels. It's only in India for now.
I would make a conspiracy, but the U.S. Government has been talking about a ban for awhile now. It makes sense for FaceBook to capitalize, especially if Twitter is not going to make Vine 2 like they promised.

The contention may lie in its medium since it's a video/audio platform instead of a text-based one. It's easy to accidentally record something that you shouldn't, especially if you're toying with the options for minutes while the camera rolls. Real-time automated detection of interesting content is getting easier and easier and you can bet China is acting as a legal wiretap on every user. The Navy banned it in December and I'm assuming that's why. https://www.theguardian.com/technol...ile-devices-saying-its-a-cybersecurity-threat (Archive)
In general, the usage of data is concerning. So many place their entire lives on this app.
There has already been a discussion about data going to advertisers, which has tipped off Americans that are unaware, now imagine the reaction to data being sent to a communist party. While I understand advertisers, a nation and a business should be seperate, Tik Tok is concerning if all is true.
 

Robert Sanvagene

Level 9 Microsoft Certified Techneesheean
kiwifarms.net
Well, nothing of value would be lost if TikTok got nuked right now. Most of it are teenagers doing retarded dances anyway. Or maybe I'm just a grumpy 20 something getting too old for internet fads.
IMHO anyone who is 25 years or older and using TikTok should be viewed with at least some suspicion. Exhibit A for the Prosecution:
Tiktok has become strangely popular with middle aged women. Probably because of quarantine.
 

-4ZURE-

Kill Every Last One of Them!
kiwifarms.net
The incident with that perv theBudday was proof enough tiktok was a sickfuck's hunting ground.
That was really early on too. Luckily the guy was a complete idiot and pretty much threw all evidence to the public. Him only using the video duet feature on dancing children videos did not help his case.

IMHO anyone who is 25 years or older and using TikTok should be viewed with at least some suspicion. Exhibit A for the Prosecution:
Depends on context. Obviously celebrities and advertisers are using it, and in some ways it has become video FaceBook, explaining the rise in middle-aged women. Now if they are dueting tons of children’s videos, I say red flags should go up.
 
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-4ZURE-

Kill Every Last One of Them!
kiwifarms.net
Best news of 2020. Never liked vine either. And like vine only the best content or cringiest content will actually survive. But I'll at least enjoy all the butthurt tweens and "influencers".
I used to like TikTok, but it is definitely Vine but worse nowadays. It had like 1 good year, only then to be ruined by influencers, creepy older people, politics, dances, and random rich white boys. The entire site has just become a mainstream trending page devoid of any real creativity.
 

Ahriman

Vivere Militare Est.
kiwifarms.net
This could mean good business for NordVPN.
View attachment 1442186

Normies have been ruining the internet WAAAAAAAAY before TikTok was even a thing.

View attachment 1442194
While I agree with the image, it happened way before that, back during the AOL days. There's a name for it:

1596348161216.png


Speaking of, is Usenet active/worth checking out these days? I was a noob teen at the time and never tried it out, so I missed out on the golden years, but I could certainly see a Usenet reinassance.
 

Quijibo69

Worse Title Ever!
kiwifarms.net
Try having your younger family members watch the same TikTok for the entire fucking day with speakers so all you hear is deep fried 80s music looped for 10 seconds over and over and over. Please ban TikTok, or just nuke the fucking HQ. This is ear sodomy.
This thread's theme:


A kid listening to 80's music today is like A kid in the 80's listening to 40's music.
 

Puff

God of Chaos
kiwifarms.net
Normies have always been around, Tik Tok was a platform that rounded them up, kept them in one location so to speak. Without it, they will likely just go or go back to polluting places like YouTube.
Never meant to imply they were never a thing prior to Tik Tok.


This is actually a disturbing thought. While I understand and kinda agree with the Tik Tok ban given the state of China right now, it is scary to think where this may go in the future and is worth discussion in its own right.
Also, I heard India banned VPNS for Tik Tok, so that is a real concern.


It always has been. Even when it was musically, many older women used it. I am guessing it is a vying for attention in their old age. Many are on the bigger side, and are not the most attractive so to speak. There were also a lot of older dudes, probably looking to hook up with 13 year olds on the app, one even get caught.


I would make a conspiracy, but the U.S. Government has been talking about a ban for awhile now. It makes sense for FaceBook to capitalize, especially if Twitter is not going to make Vine 2 like they promised.


In general, the usage of data is concerning. So many place their entire lives on this app.
There has already been a discussion about data going to advertisers, which has tipped off Americans that are unaware, now imagine the reaction to data being sent to a communist party. While I understand advertisers, a nation and a business should be seperate, Tik Tok is concerning if all is true.
The idea of containment sites/boards is retarded and you should feel retarded. Also if there was a containment board for the whole web, they're Twitter for the crazies and Facebook for the normies.

The thing I'd be glad to see it banned for is the search and feed manipulation the ChiComs are undoubtedly doing.
 

Rikka Takarada 2

I can't access my old account
kiwifarms.net
TechCrunch covers the (predictable) reaction from brainwashed Chinese "patriots" to the possible sale of TikTok. Tl;dr: Chinese companies buying stakes and controlling interests in western companies = fine. One Chinese company selling part of a business to the US to at least cut its losses rather than get outright banned = literal treason (and God forbid anyone ever be exposed to a different way of thinking than ChInA NuBaH OnE!!!1!)

Chinese internet users brand ByteDance CEO a ‘traitor’ as TikTok seeks US buyer

ByteDance is not backing down from its ambitions to become a global technology powerhouse, even as TikTok loses its largest market (India) and faces insurmountable challenges in the U.S. But some in China are blasting the Beijing-based company as too accommodating and yielding to U.S. demands.

ByteDance said it will “remain committed to our vision to become a globalized company” despite the flurry of challenges thrown at it, it said in a statement posted late Sunday.

Following months of efforts to sway U.S. regulators and the public, TikTok reluctantly arrived at two concessions: “We faced the real possibility of a forced sale of TikTok’s US business by CFIUS or an executive order banning on the TikTok app in the US,” ByteDance founder and CEO Zhang Yiming wrote to employees in a letter on Monday.


The TikTok saga is evolving on an hourly basis. As of writing, Microsoft has confirmed it’s in talks with U.S. officials to pursue a TikTok purchase. Trump previously said he would not support the purchase of the Chinese-owned app by an American company.

On the China end, Zhang told his staff that the company has “initiated preliminary discussions with a tech company to help clear the way for us to continue offering the TikTok app in the US.” The message corroborates reassurance from the app’s U.S. general manager Vanessa Pappas that TikTok is “not planning on going anywhere.”

Zhang is unabashed about his frustration in the letter: “We disagree with CFIUS’s conclusion because we have always been committed to user safety, platform neutrality, and transparency. However, we understand their decision in the current macro environment.”

Angry netizens
But ByteDance’s responses clearly have not won favor with some people in China. On Weibo, a popular microblogging platform in China, hundreds of anonymous users joined in under a post about Zhang’s letter, cursing him as a traitor of China, an American apologist and a coward, among many other labels.

“Zhang Yiming used to praise the US for allowing debate, unlike in China, where opinions are one-sided. Now he got a slap in the face, why doesn’t he go argue with the US?” chastised one of the most popular comments with more than 3,600 likes.

The commentator appears to be referring to some of Zhang’s Weibo posts from the early 2010s, which can be seen by some as liberal-leaning, putting the entrepreneur in the rank of “public intellectuals.” The term has in recent years been thought of as derogatory, as internet patriots see the group as ignorant and worshippers of Western values.

“The general view among Chinese social media users is that this is a tit-for-tat measure as part of the ongoing U.S.-China trade war. They also believe that these steps are being taken due to TikTok’s success and because it has now become a threat to U.S. platforms such as Facebook and Twitter,” said Rich Bishop, CEO of AppInChina, which helps international apps and games publish in China.

Zhang’s Weibo account is currently suspended, presumably to prevent armies of angry patriots from flooding his posts.

It’s hard to gauge how representative the online sentiment is of the Chinese public, or whether the discourse is orchestrated by government-paid commentators. Compared to the internet fury, though, Beijing appeared relatively resigned, with a Foreign Ministry spokesperson merely denying U.S. allegations against TikTok as fabricated “out of nothing” during a regular presser. (There’s no concrete evidence publicly presented by the U.S. government yet to support its claims that TikTok is a national security threat.)

After all, the Chinese government can’t do much to retaliate, given there are scant examples of American internet giants with a considerable business in China.

Sympathy from peers
Startups and investors in China are more sympathetic toward ByteDance. Many agree that if the Microsoft deal goes through, it could be the least bad outcome for TikTok.

“They are stuck between a rock and a hard place,” said William Bao Bean, general partner at Chinaccelerator, a cross-border accelerator backed by SOSV. “We are in a fast-changing regulatory environment. I think the consumers would probably want to continue using the service, and this is one potential way to make that happen. Obviously, I don’t think it’s what ByteDance really wants.”

AppInChina’s Bishop reminded us of Microsoft’s non-confrontational attitude toward Beijing. “I think it’s a good outcome for all sides. Microsoft of course benefits hugely from getting into social media. ByteDance gets a good payout, and Bytedance and the Chinese government are relatively friendly towards Microsoft.”

The tech community is well aware that TikTok is a rarity. Although the backlash will have a chilling effect on Chinese companies expanding to the U.S., and potentially other Western markets, there simply aren’t many internet companies going from China to the West in the first place.

“Most solutions that are built for China don’t solve problems that people have in the West,” observed Bao Bean.

Chinese games probably have the best shot in conquering the West, as WeChat parent Tencent, through aggressive acquisitions and numerous smash-hits, has demonstrated. Smaller developers resort to the strategy of “laying low” about their Chinese origin.

“We simply don’t take media interviews,” said the CEO of a U.S.-listed Chinese internet firm on condition of anonymity.

“It’s not about the chilling effect. The problem is there won’t be opportunities in the U.S., Canada, Australia or India anymore. The chance of succeeding in Europe is also becoming smaller, and the risks are increasing a lot,” a former executive overseeing an American giant’s Chinese business lamented, asking not to be named.

“From now on, Chinese companies going global can only look to Southeast Asia, Africa and South America.”
T
 
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