Science The first-ever photo of a black hole released today - get hyped

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polonium

By your genders combined, I am Captain Tumblr
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The post has been edited such that the pic no longer automatically appears.

Also the title seems incorrect?
it's correct in that they're giving all the credit to the development manager and not the guy that came up with the algorithm, or the guy that wrote most of the code. Arguing about specifically how many lines he wrote is a bit weaselly.
 

X Prime

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it's correct in that they're giving all the credit to the development manager and not the guy that came up with the algorithm, or the guy that wrote most of the code. Arguing about specifically how many lines he wrote is a bit weaselly.
You're absolutely right. I personally just think it was foolish of the pic poster to give the narrative pushers a leg to stand on.
 

Mariposa Electrique

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We need a space megathread because this just creates more questions for laymen like me.

Like, why is this so blurry, but that beautiful picture of all the galaxies is so clear? This also applies to why pictures of things in our own solar system are blurry or were blurry such as Ceres and Pluto respectively.
Space & Physics
 

Haramburger

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New York Times is running a rare article that doesn't suck:
(archive: http://archive.li/N7A0j )
How Katie Bouman Accidentally Became the Face of the Black Hole Project
By Sarah Mervosh
April 11, 2019

As the first-ever picture of a black hole was unveiled this week, another image began making its way around the internet: a photo of a young scientist, clasping her hands over her face and reacting with glee to an image of an orange ring of light, circling a deep, dark abyss.

It was a photo too good not to share. The scientist, Katie Bouman, a postdoctoral fellow who contributed to the project, became an instant hero for women and girls in STEM, a welcome symbol in a world hungry for representation.

Public figures from Washington to Hollywood learned her name. And some advocates, familiar with how history can write over the contributions of women, quickly moved to make sure she received the recognition she deserved. In their eagerness to celebrate her, however, many nonscientists on social media overstated her role in what was a group effort by hundreds of people, creating an exaggerated impression as the photo was shared and reshared.

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As Dr. Bouman herself was quick to point out, she was by no means solely responsible for the discovery, which was a result of a worldwide collaboration among scientists who worked together to create the image from a network of radio antennas.

The project, led by Shep Doeleman, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, was the work of more than 200 researchers. About 40 of them were women, according to Harvard’s Black Hole Initiative.

“There are women involved in every single step of this amazing project,” said Sara Issaoun, 24, a graduate student at Radboud University in the Netherlands who worked on the research. “As a woman in STEM myself, it’s good to have role models out there who young girls and young boys can look up to.”

But Ms. Issaoun warned against a “lone-wolf success” narrative. “The diversity and group effort and the breadth of our collaboration, I think, is worth celebration,” she said.

To capture the image of a black hole — a mysterious phenomenon long thought to be unseeable — the scientists used eight radio observatories across the globe to observe the galaxy on and off for 10 days in April 2017. Then they embarked on the painstaking effort to process enormous amounts of data and map it into an image.

Dr. Bouman, who will soon become an assistant professor at the California Institute of Technology, indeed played a significant role in the imaging process, which involved researchers breaking up into teams to map the data and compare and test the images they created.

While she led the development of an algorithm to take a picture of a black hole, an effort that was the subject of a TED Talk she gave in 2016, her colleagues said that technique was not ultimately used to create this particular image.

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After the burst of publicity spread her smiling face across Twitter, Facebook, Reddit and news sites around the globe, Dr. Bouman did not initially respond to requests for comment Thursday. In a Facebook post, she said: “No one algorithm or person made this image. It required the amazing talent of a team of scientists from around the globe.”

“It has been truly an honor,” she added, “and I am so lucky to have had the opportunity to work with you all.”

In a text message late Thursday night, Dr. Bouman said that she had to turn her phone off because she was getting so many messages. “I’m so glad that everyone is as excited as we are and people are finding our story inspirational,’’ she wrote. “However, the spotlight should be on the team and no individual person. Focusing on one person like this helps no one, including me.”

Other women on the project also celebrated this week as years of hard work were finally made public.

“Honestly, it was a dream come true,” Sandra Bustamante, a telescope instrumentalist who worked on the project, said in an interview this week.

Feryal Ozel, an astronomy and astrophysics professor at the University of Arizona who was on the science council for the project, first published a paper on black hole imaging in 2000. She called the unveiling “a sweet moment that’s been a long time in the making.”

In an interview on Thursday, Dr. Ozel said that it was exciting to see people interested in the role of women in science, but she highlighted the contributions of other women and men. That included one of her male graduate students, who took multiple trips to the South Pole, where one of the telescopes was located.

“I think giving credit to any single individual — whether this is a woman or man, young or old — harms the collaboration,” she said.

Penn Sheppard, who works with Girls Inc., an organization that empowers young women and offers after-school programming to support girls learning in science, technology, engineering and math, said that Dr. Bouman’s story resonated in an industry in which women are underrepresented — and in a world in which their scientific contributions have historically gone unacknowledged.

“It was an opportunity to see an accomplished woman play a significant role, and being acknowledged in that role,” she said. “That’s significant because girls and young boys are starting to see that women are scientists — not just you can be, but you are.”

Ms. Issaoun said she also wanted to celebrate the success of a diverse collaboration of scientists, but she said she understood why the photo of Dr. Bouman went viral.

“We love this photo too, because she looks so happy,” said Ms. Issaoun, who said she got shivers when she saw the image of a black hole. “I think her expression really captures how we all felt when we first saw it.”

A version of this article appears in print on April 12, 2019, on Page A19 of the New York edition with the headline: Black Hole Hero Just One Among Many.
Basically, scientists aren't used to have halfway-photogenic women on their teams and the media in general ran with their normal playbook of "attractive white woman does a science" without considering the huge amount of evidence that she was a minor contributor & not in a position of leadership. Damage control is now in place for radfems to stop the bleeding from shooting themselves in the foot over their eagerness to prove their superiority for 15 minutes again.

"But Ms. Issaoun warned against a “lone-wolf success” narrative. “The diversity and group effort and the breadth of our collaboration, I think, is worth celebration,” she said. "

being my favorite quote.

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Wait. So she didn't have anything to do at all with the picture then? She developed an algorithm for long long long distance high res photography, but they used a different method here?

While she led the development of an algorithm to take a picture of a black hole, an effort that was the subject of a TED Talk she gave in 2016, her colleagues said that technique was not ultimately used to create this particular image.
I mean, this woman is correcting the record at every chance she gets, so she shouldn't be blamed for being solely credited with something I'm starting to wonder if she was even involved with. She even recognizes it's damaging to do so, as it takes credit from the rest of the team.

Penn Sheppard, who works with Girls Inc., an organization that empowers young women and offers after-school programming to support girls learning in science, technology, engineering and math, said that Dr. Bouman’s story resonated in an industry in which women are underrepresented — and in a world in which their scientific contributions have historically gone unacknowledged.
Ah, the narrative pushers themselves. Nice job again idiots, now there's pushback against this lady who didn't even do anything wrong because you've overpromoting her...
 
I feel bad for the woman that the media was in such a rush to use despite her minor role in the overall project. I especially pity her because her expression of joy at the success of the project seems so very genuine.
I know... I assume they did this on purpose banking on the reaction so they can be all "OMG white men just can't let a woman get any credit!!!!!!! Gamergate! Gamergate!"

I hope this lady doesn't get hassled by a bunch of fools because she's being used as bait.
 

Haramburger

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I feel bad for the woman that the media was in such a rush to use despite her minor role in the overall project. I especially pity her because her expression of joy at the success of the project seems so very genuine.
the worst part is there's plenty of other women on the team, it's not like it was 1 woman, 198 guys. They just took a perky photo and made up the details. But like Corbin said, she's tried to be upfront about her involvement and downplay it since the story broke big so I can't be mad at her directly. She is definitely getting used.

The worst part is the normies on my social media are STILL sharing the gay Katie Did It All images, because shit pages like Science Rocks My World™ are still running with it.
 

Irrelevant

kiwifarms.net
Why do feminists always choose a hill to die on like this? Dr Bouman's contribution stands by itself but now they've made this mess.

They do the same with Ada Lovelace. Not much of her story is true anymore. Even seen them start doing it to Grace Hopper after ignoring her for decades. Apparently she invented the very concept of programming.

But no way that guy actually wrote 800k lines. That's clearly some libraries or data he committed.

Also that code... I wonder how often they got a few hours into processing 5 petabytes for some syntax error to occur because they clearly don't even lint. 5PB of data and not a single use of generators? How much memory did this thing take to run?

These universities should outsource data analysis to Google or Amazon. I'm sure people would volunteer and get it done better and faster.
 
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Positron

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"But Ms. Issaoun warned against a “lone-wolf success” narrative. “The diversity and group effort and the breadth of our collaboration, I think, is worth celebration,” she said. "
Yup. The most important thing the public needs to know about people doing science is this thing: modern science is invariably a massively collaborative project. Still, "diversity" doesn't mean jack squat in science.
 

Ambidextype

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Allowing normies into the internet was a mistake. They believe the media without waiting a bit for more info to come out and just run with it and that almost always resulted in the harmful outcomes. While the media is as usual incompetent for misleading but by now normies should know better.
 
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