The foraging thread - No such thing as a free lunch?

Stoneheart

Well hung, and snow white tan
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They also make decent applesauce, it's a bit more sour than sweet applesauce (unless you add sugar of course) and you get something more like Dutch appelmoes: it goes well with chicken, game, pork, leek, onion, cabbage. Or you can mix it with mashed potatoes to make bliksem, or mix with mashed potatoes and leafy greens (maybe foraged greens) to make stamppot.
You eat it on potato pancakes...
 
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afternoon_tea

thank you Dr. Purr, very cool
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As a rule, younger leaves are better for most plants to avoid the bitterness, and so they're not too tough. Dandelions, garlic mustard, and nettles especially. Nettles are very healthy unless they're flowering and you mustn't eat older leaves, because that's when they start developing calcium crystals that aren't good for you. At least, so I'm told, it might be bullshit but I haven't risked it. The young leaves are nice and there's lots of them anyway! You can use them in pretty much any recipe where you'd use spinach, just cook or dry them to get rid of their sting.
Nettles are one of my favorites. I love making nettle pesto (the grinding gets rid of the stingers). I'll usually throw in a little garlic mustard too since they both are at their prime for eating at the same time.

If you find older nettles you can always make a hair rinse with them, the silica content is good for your hair. My hair has gotten more delicate as I've aged and rinsing with nettles makes it feel so smooth and silky.

Yesterday I got some rosehips and elderberries. I did a little mushroom foray not expecting to find edibles, but found a lot of cool non edibles though, including some stinky squid and a perfect and huge destroying angel (a. virosa). I found a handful of chanterelles though, so now I have a new spot to look after the next rain. I took the few I found and put them in some vodka with some peppercorns. It gives it a nice apricot-like flavor.

I have a tree in my backyard with chicken of the woods I can get whenever I want which is pretty cool. I also have some oyster and shiitake logs.
 

Hongourable Madisha

Happy Hongukkah
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I tried making the horse chestnut detergent and used it on my hair, and it actually feels better than a lot of shampoos, it's clean and soft and not greasy but not dried out either. Hippies and wooks and crusties now have no excuse not to wash, they can get conkers free, they're not adding synthetic chemical shampoos to the water system, and it's not imported from far away with a big carbon footprint. Wash your local wook today.
 

Hongourable Madisha

Happy Hongukkah
kiwifarms.net
Nettles are one of my favorites. I love making nettle pesto (the grinding gets rid of the stingers). I'll usually throw in a little garlic mustard too since they both are at their prime for eating at the same time.

If you find older nettles you can always make a hair rinse with them, the silica content is good for your hair. My hair has gotten more delicate as I've aged and rinsing with nettles makes it feel so smooth and silky.

Yesterday I got some rosehips and elderberries. I did a little mushroom foray not expecting to find edibles, but found a lot of cool non edibles though, including some stinky squid and a perfect and huge destroying angel (a. virosa). I found a handful of chanterelles though, so now I have a new spot to look after the next rain. I took the few I found and put them in some vodka with some peppercorns. It gives it a nice apricot-like flavor.

I have a tree in my backyard with chicken of the woods I can get whenever I want which is pretty cool. I also have some oyster and shiitake logs.
That's really cool, how did you grow them on the logs? I've heard of people using books they don't read any more to grow mushrooms, they buy or collect the spores, soak a book in water, open out the book, then shake the spores over the top and it grows. Well done on finding chanterelles, those are really expensive in the shops round here. I like them just fried with butter, or on pasta.
Rosehips are nice to snack on (as long as you eat around the seeds, they have itchy hairs on them), there's some near my house and I usually pick a couple to eat while I'm foraging other things. The only things I've been able to make with them is syrup and ketchup; they taste a lot like tomato but a bit sweeter, so they make a good sauce.
 

afternoon_tea

thank you Dr. Purr, very cool
kiwifarms.net
That's really cool, how did you grow them on the logs? I've heard of people using books they don't read any more to grow mushrooms, they buy or collect the spores, soak a book in water, open out the book, then shake the spores over the top and it grows. Well done on finding chanterelles, those are really expensive in the shops round here. I like them just fried with butter, or on pasta.
Rosehips are nice to snack on (as long as you eat around the seeds, they have itchy hairs on them), there's some near my house and I usually pick a couple to eat while I'm foraging other things. The only things I've been able to make with them is syrup and ketchup; they taste a lot like tomato but a bit sweeter, so they make a good sauce.
My current logs I made by using mycelium spawned on sawdust (this is easy to buy online, but I have a friend who has his own little mushroom lab) then you drill holes in dead logs that are appropriate for that type of mushroom and stuff it full of the spawn and seal it with wax, then I just leave them in a spot in the backyard that gets damp when it rains and wait for them to colonize. Usually it takes about a year for them to fruit, but I've had logs that took 3 years, I never thought they'd fruit.

They also sell mushroom growing kits but these can be kind of expensive. I think there's a few that are paper based, but these you can only get a couple fruitings from.

I make rosehip jelly with oranges and pink lady apples and just strain the seeds out during the process. I live near the beach and we get these enormous hips from the beach roses here, they have way more fruit on them than most other rosehips I've seen.
 

Hongourable Madisha

Happy Hongukkah
kiwifarms.net
My current logs I made by using mycelium spawned on sawdust (this is easy to buy online, but I have a friend who has his own little mushroom lab) then you drill holes in dead logs that are appropriate for that type of mushroom and stuff it full of the spawn and seal it with wax, then I just leave them in a spot in the backyard that gets damp when it rains and wait for them to colonize. Usually it takes about a year for them to fruit, but I've had logs that took 3 years, I never thought they'd fruit.

They also sell mushroom growing kits but these can be kind of expensive. I think there's a few that are paper based, but these you can only get a couple fruitings from.

I make rosehip jelly with oranges and pink lady apples and just strain the seeds out during the process. I live near the beach and we get these enormous hips from the beach roses here, they have way more fruit on them than most other rosehips I've seen.
I think those are the same roses that the council plants round my way, rosa rugosa. They have these big fat hips on them that look and taste like tomato.
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Acorns are great forage. Bake them or dry them and grind into flour for bannock bread
I've never tried that but seen it done on shows like Ray Mears and River Cottage. How does it taste, does the tannin all come out in the drying?
 

Rafal Gan Ganowicz

Please do not rate this user's posts autistic.
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I think those are the same roses that the council plants round my way, rosa rugosa. They have these big fat hips on them that look and taste like tomato.
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I've never tried that but seen it done on shows like Ray Mears and River Cottage. How does it taste, does the tannin all come out in the drying?
Yep. It's bland, TBF. But if you butter and salt anything enough, it's tops!
 
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Battlecruiser3000ad

greetings frum india i hate gays
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Vegetables be damned I only forage for mushrooms.
It's good that sometimes people die, it keeps the masses from the forests and leads to more bounty. Sucks that near towns you have to arrive in the forest with the break of dawn to have a chance to score and to beat others to the good spots.

I could identify every single deadly mushroom that grows here, and also all the very tasty ones, as a very small kid. I think pretty much all branches of my family are big into it.
 
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Stoneheart

Well hung, and snow white tan
kiwifarms.net
Got me some nice Boletus on a hike yesterday.
Today i will make Ragout from them.
The woods are full of mushrooms this year.
maybe i will get me some Amanita on the weekend, i know a nice spot for them very close to my weekly bikeroute.
They are very nice if you know how to cook them. I think i will fry them with horse liver like grandma did it.
 
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Battlecruiser3000ad

greetings frum india i hate gays
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I like amanita rubescens for a quick snack, just fried with a bit of salt on a piece of bread.

The cruelest thing that happened to me was once long time ago the forest was suddenly full of the bitter boletes. They look so beautiful and get your hopes up and boom it's a bitterboy. Dunno what happened since otherwise I see them rarely, but that one year they were everywhere. There are ways to drain the bitterness off them but I think it's not worth the effort for any other reason that to prove you can do it.
 
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NOT Sword Fighter Super

"Cheerleeder" of Slapfights
True & Honest Fan
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Has anybody found an easy way to make acorns edible yet?
I know you can boil the tannins out of them to make them safe, but that takes fucking forever.
 
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Hongourable Madisha

Happy Hongukkah
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I've found a lot of barberries around - they're very invasive and escape from people's gardens. That brings up an important point regarding how edible some plants are: barberries are mostly safe, but are dangerous for infants and pregnant women and can interact with certain medications.
A few commonly cultivated plants like grapefruits can stop absorption of medications - doctors and medication packaging will often warn you about grapefruit because it's a popular food, but they won't list every single wild herb. Hawthorn can affect blood pressure and heart medication, again, they're safe if you don't have specific issues with them but it's still important to check.
WebMD has a drug interaction checker, so it's worthwhile looking them up there too, I'll add it to the OP. Here's the page for barberries: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-433/european-barberry
 
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