The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

Coffee Anon

kiwifarms.net
Be sure to add a /swap partition. Even with 32GB of ram I added a 1GB /swap just to be safe.
I was purposely not including a swap because I've never used up all my 16 GB (except when running a large calculation one time) and I figured it's a waste of drive space and I don't suspend my desktop.
I figured if programs try to use it regardless then I could always add it in a ramfs or something like that.
I wonder if that's why I couldn't get it to boot?
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
Not sure. A couple years back, when upstream chromium allowed for the jumbo-build USE flag, I ran out of ram with an 8 core CPU running with make -j8 with 16GB of ram. It also wiped out /swap and froze the system. That's when I replaced the 16GB with 32GB (4GB/core is good imo), and also added liquid cooling to the CPU along with some additional case fans (CPU was hitting over 80 C centigrade, now it doesn't even get close to that). With 32GB, I still kept /swap, and building chromium with jumbo-build enabled (and ccache for future minor revision builds) I was able to build a fresh chromium in 90 minutes, and minor revision builds in under 8 minutes... 31 of 32GB of ram were used. Seeing my free ram at under 1GB was weird. Without the jumbo-build USE flag it took over 4 hours.

However, chromium upstream has now disabled jumbo-build.

Because of that experience, I always just add a bit of /swap regardless of how much ram I have.

I should add this, if you need a starting place to manually configure your kernel, there is Pappy McFae's kernel seeds. While Pappy is no longer with us (RIP), his kernel seeds still are. The Genkernel package (used to automatically build kernels) came out well after I had started using Gentoo, so I never bothered with it. I find it better to manually configure it for my needs.

It is painfully clear that there is A LOT of things to learn from you. All of my Linux knowledge boils down to trial by fire.
Trial by fire (and research) for me as well, but I started using Linux as my main OS when Microsoft was trying to sell a bunch of bug fixes by calling it Windows 98se. Too many annoyances and crashes pushed me into the loving arms of a waddle of penguins.
 
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ArnoldPalmer

kiwifarms.net
Why is there no love for xfce? Had a junker laptop years ago and xfce was all it could run well. Have much better hardware but stuck with xfce over the years. Its snappy, works and I'm used to it.

What am I missing by not switching other than bells and whistles?
I hate xfce, not because it's lightweight, but because of extremely stupid and ancient design elements that wouldn't consume any extra resources to improve. Panel editing, Launchers, and the Whiskermenu are all genuinely awful implementations that wouldn't look out of place in Windows 98. With as old as xfce is, it has no business missing critical low budget features and QoL improvements that bring it into this century.
 
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Win98SE

kiwifarms.net
pacman -S inxi

Then run inxi -Fxxxz

Show the results, you might as well tap into the autistic hivemind of the farms for help.
I've been able to fix the problem by using a setting in Kodi to lock the refresh rate to that of the video, so 24 in most cases. I haven't tried 60fps content yet, but the TV starts flickering before booting into X11, where it reports being at 60. I'm not sure why this is the case given that game consoles and other PCs are in 1080p60 on the same TV with no problems.

Here's the info dump:

System: Host: TVBOX Kernel: 5.4.22-1-lts x86_64 bits: 64 compiler: gcc v: 9.2.1 Console: tty 1 dm: N/A Distro: Arch Linux
Machine: Type: Laptop System: ASUSTeK product: U52F v: 1.0 serial: <filter>
Mobo: ASUSTeK model: U52F v: 1.0 serial: <filter> BIOS: American Megatrends v: U52F.206 date: 04/22/2010

Battery: ID-1: BAT0 charge: N/A condition: N/A volts: N/A model: N/A type: Unknown serial: N/A status: Unknown
Device-1: hidpp_battery_0 model: Logitech Wireless Touch Keyboard K400 Plus serial: <filter> charge: N/A
status: N/A

CPU: Topology: Dual Core model: Intel Core i3 M 350 bits: 64 type: MT MCP arch: Nehalem rev: 2 L2 cache: 3072 KiB
flags: lm nx pae sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx bogomips: 18722
Speed: 1483 MHz min/max: 933/2266 MHz Core speeds (MHz): 1: 1514 2: 1514 3: 1422 4: 1514

Graphics: Device-1: Intel Core Processor Integrated Graphics vendor: ASUSTeK driver: i915 v: kernel bus ID: 00:02.0
chip ID: 8086:0046
Display: server: X.org 1.20.7 driver: intel unloaded: modesetting alternate: fbdev,vesa tty: 199x78
Message: Unable to show advanced data. Required tool glxinfo missing.

Audio: Device-1: Intel 5 Series/3400 Series High Definition Audio vendor: ASUSTeK driver: snd_hda_intel v: kernel
bus ID: 00:1b.0 chip ID: 8086:3b56
Sound Server: ALSA v: k5.4.22-1-lts

Network: Device-1: Intel Centrino Wireless-N 1000 [Condor Peak] driver: iwlwifi v: kernel port: e020 bus ID: 02:00.0
chip ID: 8086:0083
IF: wls1 state: down mac: <filter>
Device-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR8131 Gigabit Ethernet vendor: ASUSTeK driver: atl1c v: 1.0.1.1-NAPI port: b000
bus ID: 03:00.0 chip ID: 1969:1063
IF: ens5 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>

Drives: Local Storage: total: 149.05 GiB used: 3.46 GiB (2.3%)
ID-1: /dev/sda vendor: Seagate model: ST9160310AS size: 149.05 GiB speed: 3.0 Gb/s serial: <filter> rev: 0303
scheme: MBR

Partition: ID-1: / size: 145.71 GiB used: 3.46 GiB (2.4%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1

Sensors: System Temperatures: cpu: 53.0 C mobo: N/A
Fan Speeds (RPM): N/A

Info: Processes: 118 Uptime: 5h 01m Memory: 3.64 GiB used: 447.8 MiB (12.0%) Init: systemd v: 244 Compilers: gcc: 9.2.1
Shell: bash v: 5.0.16 running in: tty 1 (SSH) inxi: 3.0.37

btw, inxi got dropped from Arch and is now in the AUR.
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
Here's something else in Aur to help with the glxinfo : https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/glxinfo/

Why is there no love for xfce? Had a junker laptop years ago and xfce was all it could run well. Have much better hardware but stuck with xfce over the years. Its snappy, works and I'm used to it.

What am I missing by not switching other than bells and whistles?
XFCE is fine. I definitely prefer it over Gnome3, but i3-gaps is pretty much heaven for me. Everything just happens right under my finger tips instantaneously. Once I startx, I hit mod+enter for a terminal, then mod+2 mod+d enter for firefox on the second workspace, followed by mod+d b enter for Burpsuite in the same workspace. This all takes a few seconds. In XFCE I have to actually navigate menus.
 
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Stock Image Photographer

All my homies hate human rights
kiwifarms.net
A good idea is to configure zram partitions as swap, if your computer doesn't belong in a museum some light compression 100% in RAM is usually still a lot faster than trashing even an SSD. Because of scheduling junk one partition per CPU core is a good idea, size I usually use equal to as much RAM as the machine has, evenly divded up between the zram partitions. Even with heavy swap usage I never ran into issues. If you have lots of RAM you can also skip having swap but it's always preferable to Linux broken OOM Killer if things go wrong. You can also put /tmp/ in a RAM disk. /var/tmp *theoretically* also since nothing states that data there needs to survive reboots. If you have a source based distro like gentoo, putting the workspace where the sources get unpacked and compiled into a ram disk is a considerable speed boost.
I looked up zram since this was the first time I'd heard of it, and it seems like a much better alternative to a standard swap partition. However, I couldn't find much on setting it up. Do you have any advice or resources on doing so?
This thread can help me decide what I should switch to.
In order of the Like categories, please vote:
Arch (like)
Gentoo (dislike)
Alpine (agree)
FreeBSD (disagree)
Void (Achievement)
Suicide (Winner)
Keep Fedora (Mad at the Internet)
Am I exceptional, or did you purposely put Void as the one that we can't select because you don't want to use it?
 

AmpleApricots

kiwifarms.net
I looked up zram since this was the first time I'd heard of it, and it seems like a much better alternative to a standard swap partition. However, I couldn't find much on setting it up. Do you have any advice or resources on doing so?
using the standard set of tools most distros have and a kernel with zram compiled as module and sysfs:

modprobe/kmod zram num_devices=(number of CPUs)

this will create {0..number of CPUs - 1} zram devices with the size of zero

then to set their size you can simply write the value you need into disksize

e.g. 2GB for device zero:

echo 2G > /sys/block/zram0/disksize

note here that this is more of a "maximum value" and the space is only allocated when it's actually needed.

then to set up the swap area (expecting that the dev nodes were created):

mkswap /dev/zram0

to activate it for use by the kernel

swapon /dev/zram0 -p 10

(this requires the linux kernel userland utilities which are usually installed)

- to activate the swap partition, - interesting here is the priority flag which tells the kernel what swap device to fill up first/prefer. The higher number devices are preferred, then come the lower number devices. By default this value is -1 which is lowest priority. If you system uses some harddrive swap with no priority set, this makes sure the zram swap partition is chosen over it. This is not as clean cut with modern kernels, it still doesn't hurt to give it a hint that the zram device is in fact fastest. If you have a multicore machine and have one zram device set up per core, setting all these zram devices to the same priority will make the kernel share the data between the devices, kinda like RAID striping. This will make it possible for the scheduler to split the compression/decompression workload over the different cores if necessary/useful, hence why multiple zram devices.

repeat/automate as necessary for the other zwap devices and sizes in scripting language of choice.

So actually pretty simple, these steps can easily be reversed to disable zram swap again. You can also add entries in fstab to activate swap that way, but I personally find it easier to script it and in my setup this is in a "do once on boot" setup script I've written for runit. There doesn't need to be any clean-up at shutdown since the memory gets freed/lost anyways. To translate these instructions into a preferred scripting language/instructions for some service manager is left as an exercise to the reader.
 

3119967d0c

"a brain" - @REGENDarySumanai
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I looked up zram since this was the first time I'd heard of it, and it seems like a much better alternative to a standard swap partition. However, I couldn't find much on setting it up. Do you have any advice or resources on doing so?
On Ubuntu, I just installed zram-config and restarted. Imagine same can probably be done on other similar distros. Configuration options could probably be usefully tweaked.
 

uncleShitHeel

Full of sunshine and rancid mayonaise.
kiwifarms.net
Currently running Arch for babies like OP.

I quite like it. My only quibble is that the realtek network card this laptop came with has lost bluetooth capabilities for no discernible reason.

Edit: @AmpleApricots thanks for the heads up on minetest. I would gild you but this isn't reddit and neither of us a complete cucks.
 
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Stock Image Photographer

All my homies hate human rights
kiwifarms.net
using the standard set of tools most distros have and a kernel with zram compiled as module and sysfs:

modprobe/kmod zram num_devices=(number of CPUs)

this will create {0..number of CPUs - 1} zram devices with the size of zero

then to set their size you can simply write the value you need into disksize

e.g. 2GB for device zero:

echo 2G > /sys/block/zram0/disksize

note here that this is more of a "maximum value" and the space is only allocated when it's actually needed.

then to set up the swap area (expecting that the dev nodes were created):

mkswap /dev/zram0

to activate it for use by the kernel

swapon /dev/zram0 -p 10

(this requires the linux kernel userland utilities which are usually installed)

- to activate the swap partition, - interesting here is the priority flag which tells the kernel what swap device to fill up first/prefer. The higher number devices are preferred, then come the lower number devices. By default this value is -1 which is lowest priority. If you system uses some harddrive swap with no priority set, this makes sure the zram swap partition is chosen over it. This is not as clean cut with modern kernels, it still doesn't hurt to give it a hint that the zram device is in fact fastest. If you have a multicore machine and have one zram device set up per core, setting all these zram devices to the same priority will make the kernel share the data between the devices, kinda like RAID striping. This will make it possible for the scheduler to split the compression/decompression workload over the different cores if necessary/useful, hence why multiple zram devices.

repeat/automate as necessary for the other zwap devices and sizes in scripting language of choice.

So actually pretty simple, these steps can easily be reversed to disable zram swap again. You can also add entries in fstab to activate swap that way, but I personally find it easier to script it and in my setup this is in a "do once on boot" setup script I've written for runit. There doesn't need to be any clean-up at shutdown since the memory gets freed/lost anyways. To translate these instructions into a preferred scripting language/instructions for some service manager is left as an exercise to the reader.
Wow, thank you! I set up my new machine this weekend, followed your advice (with a bit of modification), and it works great! One question: When you divide up the RAM by the number of cores, do you use physical or logical cores? My CPU has 4 physical cores and 8 logical cores, and each logical core has two threads.
Oops, Void can be deviant. I was just going in order and didn't think about it. The order of the distros was arbitrary.
lol, that one can only be used by forum supporters. For what it's worth, since you got a lot of positive feedback for Arch you should go with that if you haven't already. It has superb documentation, though its community can be a bit elitist. I did a Void install this week and it went great, even though I had to do it through a manual chroot.
 

uncleShitHeel

Full of sunshine and rancid mayonaise.
kiwifarms.net
What does rfkill say?
ID TYPE DEVICE SOFT HARD
0 bluetooth Toshiba Bluetooth unblocked unblocked
1 wlan phy0 unblocked unblocked
5 bluetooth hci0 unblocked unblocked


Power cycle. I have the same issue with my laptop. rtl8xxxu tends to send weird things to your card.
Power cycle?

Anyway around it? I've found that each time I update the kernel the updates for core shit their pants and I have to nuke the existing rtl8xxxu
 

uncleShitHeel

Full of sunshine and rancid mayonaise.
kiwifarms.net
Power cycle means taking your battery out and waiting about 30 seconds so your wireless card loses its charge.

You can just blacklist rtl8xxxu in /etc/modprobe.d/ if it's causing you problems.
Oh of course. Haven't unplugged the thing in ages.

I assume you know this already, but you have to rebuild all modules for each kernel upgrade.
Dude, just rate my shit exceptional. I was vaguely aware of it.
 
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