The Worst TV Shows You've Ever Seen -

Pargon

Hitler died, my mother also died
True & Honest Fan
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I caught a snippet of The Wendy Williams Show while I was at work in the break room.

On it, a fat-titted black woman with a New York accent so strong I at first thought it was affected somehow bloviated for 15 minutes about going to see Wicked with her supposedly famous friends (though I didn't recognize any of the names she was shamelessly dropping) when she was under the impression while she was getting ready that they were taking her to, and I quote, "da club".

All I could think was, "people pay this woman to go and see her talk about her life? That's it?".

American television is a shambles.
 

Commander X

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I only watched it because it had a reputation for being the worst TV show ever made. It is hard to believe there can be something worse. My Mother the Car. 60s show where the lead character's mother is reincarnated as a car.
I see people baffled when they realize MMTC was a real show and not a parody of "high concept" '60s sitcoms.

Sixties comedies with zany premises often have bad jokes, with every last bit of humor in the dialogue smothered by the laugh track, but they can be profoundly comic at the level of character interaction. I Dream of Jeannie was always funnier than the sum of it's jokes, with it's levels of absurdist humor and the focus on extreme situations. My Favorite Martian was another one of these series which I found surprisingly humorous, a lot of it having to do with Ray Walston's dry, deadpan performance that frankly makes other "stranded alien on Earth" sitcoms look like garbage.

Two of the most well-remembered "zany concept" sitcoms of the 1960s, The Munsters (which was a more successful creation from MMTC's creators Allan Burns and Chris Hayward) and The Addams Family also still work, both due to the stellar performances by the entire casts. The Munsters' strong point being the firmly vaudevillian humor and The Addams Family's being its commitment to being weird.

MMTC, and some of the other "goofy high concept" sitcoms of the 1960s tended to hang a lot or absolutely everything on their 'novel' premise and that's not enough to prop up a show. For every zany sitcom that was successful there were plenty that barely lasted and sunk beneath the waters of obscurity, like the 1966, only aired once pilot for "Where's Everett?" starring Alan Alda as a father who adopts an invisible alien baby that was left in a basket his doorstep and his family must deal with it's antics.
 

Stab You in the Back

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Michael Shur is a cancer.

img.jpg

(this is not a Dreamworks face meme)

Michael Shur is the creator of Parks and Recreation, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and The Good Place. All of his shows tend to follow the same pattern: funny at the beginning, but quickly devolving into heartfelt and uplifting non-comedies. With each subsequent show, the devolution becomes more rapid. Parks and Rec took three seasons, B99 two seasons and The Good Place half a season. Abby's drops the pretense and is a turgent hug box for unlikable grotesques from the very beginning.

The Premise
"Set in San Diego, the series takes place at the home of Abby, a bisexual Latina ex-Marine sergeant, who turned her backyard into an unlicensed bar complete with her own set of rules, which the eclectic set of regulars have to follow."

So its basically Cheers, except not funny and with no likable characters.

What Was Wrong With It?
I alluded to it earlier, but Abby's was a show that tried to be uplifting and emotional way too quickly. In every episode, the "comedy" would come to a screeching halt while one character or another would dump all their emotional baggage on the audience. Not a fan of Ron Funches? Well, too fucking bad, here's 7 minutes of him crying about how hard life is for a fat man. Imagine P&R doing an episode about Jerry's home life in the first season. That's how out-of-place these heart touching confessions felt watching Abby's. If you want to do heartfelt, you need to first give the audience a reason to give a shit about the character and his problems. Otherwise, its just a burden on the audience.

Now, admittedly, Cheers did have its dramatic moments in the early years. Probably one of the more well-known ones are this conversation between Coach and his daughter.


The most brilliant thing about this scene is not that Coach says all the right things. In fact, he says all the wrong things and, in doing so, unwittingly forces his daughter to see herself through his eyes. His misunderstanding--their breakdown in communication--is what ultimately solves her problem. In the Abby's version of this, the Coach would acknowledge his daughter's feelings, but persuade her to change her mind with some pablum about inner strength.


The Marketing
There were two main marketing thrusts for Abby's: 1) Mike Shur is producing, and 2) its filmed outdoors in front of a live studio audience. When your second biggest selling point is that you forced your studio audience to sit outside in the California sun for 3+ hours, you know the network had no faith in the show. Why does this matter? Well, after the show was cancelled, its star, Natalie Morales had a massive meltdown about NBC betraying 'diversity.'


When the creator of the NBC sitcom Abby’s asked actress Natalie Morales if she would be open to playing the lead character as bisexual, she replied, “Oh my God, yes!”

“We wanted to make it a normal thing and just one of the many, many things about her,” the actress says about the ex-Marine bar owner character she played on the short-lived show. She points to another NBC sitcom, Will & Grace, as an iconic example of a show that not only changed perceptions but actually affected policy surrounding gay rights.

“Art moves culture forward because we normalize things,” she adds during a new bonus episode of The Last Laugh podcast. “If you had never met a gay person and then you watched Will & Grace, then they weren’t so foreign to you.”

Morales, who is currently lending her voice to the comically dystopian scripted podcast Ellie and the Wave, hoped that would be the case with Abby’s as well. But then NBC canceled the show this past May after just 10 episodes had aired. “So much for diversity!” she says with a mordant laugh.

“I was really disappointed,” she continues. “It sucked. It sucked really hard. I think we did a really great thing. And I’m really proud of what we did.”

Abby’s, which counted Parks and Recreation and The Good Place creator Mike Schur as an executive producer, did not receive a strong embrace from either critics or audiences. Writing for Rolling Stone, Alan Sepinwall described it as a “casually woke” version of Cheers that was lacking in “belly laughs.” According to TVLine, it was NBC’s lowest-rated sitcom of the season with numbers that dropped week-to-week.

Morales feels like the network neglected to give the show proper promotion or the time it needed to grow.

“If I’m being honest, it’s bullshit to tout all of these firsts and all this inclusion and all this diversity and then not market the show whatsoever,” she says. She was told it was the first show in the history of NBC that got zero outdoor marketing. “So that tells you something,” she adds. “Not that I’m not thankful for the people that put it on the air. I just feel like, if you’re going to say that you’re about diversity, then actually walk the walk.”

The issue of representation on screen is personal for Morales. Two years ago, she penned an essay for her former Parks and Rec co-star Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls website in which she came out as queer.

After reluctantly outlining early crushes on and relationships with girls, Morales wrote, “I don’t like labeling myself, or anyone else, but if it’s easier for you to understand me, what I’m saying is that I’m queer. What queer means to me is just simply that I’m not straight. That’s all. It’s not scary, even though that word used to be really, really scary to me.”

“I’m really, really happy that I did it,” she says about the decision to come out publicly. “I was out with my friends. Everybody except for some family members knew.” Describing herself as a “private person,” she says, “The worst thing I could imagine is some stranger having some familiarity with my life. That makes me feel so weird. That would make me want to crawl out of my skin.”

Initially, Morales felt like she could be a supporter of LGBTQ+ rights from afar. She told herself, “I don’t have to say that I’m a part of this community to support it.” But then, she says, “I realized that I did. I did have to say that I was a part of it.”

This was around the time she was starting to promote her role as a lesbian tennis player in the film Battle of the Sexes. “That movie is about Billie Jean King, and her coming to terms with her sexuality is such a big part of that movie,” says Morales. “And I felt like kind of a hypocrite if I was about to do all of this press and not say that.”

She thought about when she was a kid, watching shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Xena: Warrior Princess. “If any of those people had been like, ‘Hey, I’m queer. I’m not straight. And I’m normal and my life is happy and healthy and people still love me and you’re going to be fine.’ If anybody had said that, my teen years would have been dramatically easier,” Morales says. “Not only because of exterior pain inflicted upon me, but interior stuff, how much I beat myself up for what I thought was weird or bad or sinful or not normal.”

She thought to herself, “If there’s some kid who likes what I did, or some adult who still hasn’t come out, or an adult who’s a parent to a kid, if there’s one person who will feel a little bit more normal and a little bit more understood by this, it’s a thousand times worth doing it.”

After the essay was published, Morales says she heard from a lot of people who decided to come out after reading it. “When you live in a big city like L.A. or New York, you feel like kids in school are gay and it’s not a big deal, but that’s not the case in most places in America or most places in the world. And it’s especially not the case for Latino kids and Latino families who are mostly religious.”

“You forget how important it is to do that and to also put that representation on TV.” That’s why playing “the first bisexual lead of any network comedy show ever,” in her words, was so enticing.

The whole experience has made Morales want to start producing her own work. “I’m in this weird crossroads moment,” she says. “I can either focus on other people’s creations and act in them or direct them. But I’ve been amassing this huge pile of stuff that I’ve written that I’m really excited about making.”
A lot of that is just the ramblings of a entitled Hollywood d-lister, but let me highlight this one paragraph:

“If I’m being honest, it’s bullshit to tout all of these firsts and all this inclusion and all this diversity and then not market the show whatsoever,” she says. She was told it was the first show in the history of NBC that got zero outdoor marketing. “So that tells you something,” she adds. “Not that I’m not thankful for the people that put it on the air. I just feel like, if you’re going to say that you’re about diversity, then actually walk the walk.”

"NBC doesn't support diversity because they didn't put up a billboard for my shitty little show, waaaaaaaaaaaahhhh."

Fuck Abby's and fuck that dumb bitch Natalie Morales.


(I would have put Abby's clips in this post, but the guy who had them on youtube privated all of his videos last night)
 

Steamboat_Bill

Going to beat the record of the Robert E. Lee
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I see people baffled when they realize MMTC was a real show and not a parody of "high concept" '60s sitcoms.

Sixties comedies with zany premises often have bad jokes, with every last bit of humor in the dialogue smothered by the laugh track, but they can be profoundly comic at the level of character interaction. I Dream of Jeannie was always funnier than the sum of it's jokes, with it's levels of absurdist humor and the focus on extreme situations. My Favorite Martian was another one of these series which I found surprisingly humorous, a lot of it having to do with Ray Walston's dry, deadpan performance that frankly makes other "stranded alien on Earth" sitcoms look like garbage.

Two of the most well-remembered "zany concept" sitcoms of the 1960s, The Munsters (which was a more successful creation from MMTC's creators Allan Burns and Chris Hayward) and The Addams Family also still work, both due to the stellar performances by the entire casts. The Munsters' strong point being the firmly vaudevillian humor and The Addams Family's being its commitment to being weird.

MMTC, and some of the other "goofy high concept" sitcoms of the 1960s tended to hang a lot or absolutely everything on their 'novel' premise and that's not enough to prop up a show. For every zany sitcom that was successful there were plenty that barely lasted and sunk beneath the waters of obscurity, like the 1966, only aired once pilot for "Where's Everett?" starring Alan Alda as a father who adopts an invisible alien baby that was left in a basket his doorstep and his family must deal with it's antics.
Here's another one for you, a 1966 sitcom called It's About Time, starring Imogene Coca and slobbiest man alive, Joe E. Ross:


The original idea was to have two astronauts somehow land in prehistoric times and have to adjust to living with a family of cavemen. That didn't work, so they retooled it and brought the cavemen back to then-modern times. That didn't work either, so it was cancelled.
 

Ashenthorn

Pricker bush
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“I was really disappointed,” she continues. “It sucked. It sucked really hard.
Well, she's not wrong about that. lol.

It could have been a good show. Nelson Franklin and Neil Flynn are both pretty good in anything they're in.

I totally agree with:
I alluded to it earlier, but Abby's was a show that tried to be uplifting and emotional way too quickly. In every episode, the "comedy" would come to a screeching halt while one character or another would dump all their emotional baggage on the audience.
Instead of having the lead character simply be bi (who the fuck cares, btw?), and maybe even play it for laffs, in one episode they tried to make this tiny insignificant detail into a meaningful after school special plot. Cringeworthy.
 
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murgatroid

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"On My Block" on Netflix. It's so cliche, corny and forced. Teens living in the hood and dealing with hood problems. There is literally "buried treasure" in a football field that becomes a plot point. I'm astounded it has overwhelmingly good reviews. If you have POC and social issues you have a guaranteed success apparently. Oddly the main character who had never acted before is the best actress on the show.


Horrible spanish:

 
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Duncan Hills Coffee

Oww, my byaaack
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Here's another one for you, a 1966 sitcom called It's About Time, starring Imogene Coca and slobbiest man alive, Joe E. Ross:


The original idea was to have two astronauts somehow land in prehistoric times and have to adjust to living with a family of cavemen. That didn't work, so they retooled it and brought the cavemen back to then-modern times. That didn't work either, so it was cancelled.
Fun fact, Richard Donner directed an episode of this show. And it was made by Sherwood Schwarz, same guy who made Gilligan's Island (it used many of the same sets and props, even a similar theme song).
 
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ωσкє вℓυє мυѕℓιм qυєєη

Remember, remember the 11th of September
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Bucket & Skinner, Marvin Marvin and Fred: The Show, especially.
And Game Shakers and Ricky, Dickey, Mickey and Dawn.

Sorry, did you mean to say CN Real?
Thats a rabbit hole on its own.
Yknow I feel like sharing with you a little something that those of you who dont speak spanish will be grateful you cant understand. Allow me to introduce you to one of the worst shows that has ever graced Latin American CN. I present you La CQ.

From left to right: Roque (the bully/rocker), Clara (sweetheart), Beto (NERD), Angel (a chad and stricker for a football team that used a varsity jacket), Monche (comic relief doofus), Adri (tomboy/skater), Jenny (little stacy cheerleader) and Dani (doofy minion to Jenny).
The show was produced by Pedro Ortiz de Pinedo (son of a bigger producer, Jorge Ortiz de Pinedo, who produced a lot of garbage and arguably the best programs that ever graced mexican television) and despite having an all mexican main cast was recorded in Venezuela with a venezuelan supporting cast... for reasons which is noticeable since the different accents. This one was one of the last remmanents of CN Real for LatAm long before the US was done with the block. It was a sitcom about a group of teenagers on middle school (CQ=Secundaria) which relied on slapstick, stereotypes and visual/sound gags to desperately made the audience laugh. Each character was based on a dead stereotype from some 90s sitcom and genuinely carried on the same brand of dead ass humor complete with a laughtrack. The dialog in down right cringe inducing and you can tell that most of the people on set didnt took their jobs seriousy or gave a shit.

THEY MADE A FUCKING MUSICAL TOUR.

The actors (specially Benny Emmanuel who was Beto) carried on to have respectable careers, at least for mexican t.v. standards. These days discussion about this show is usually about why this show was even made, why the cast was the way it was (everyone seems so miscast) and Mafer Urdapilleta (Jenny) being the source of several early awakenings. Without furtherados let me present you this shitfest.

CONTEXT: Chismografo is supposed to be a list of confessions passed around between classmates to get to know each other. You dont need to understand spanish to get how weird everything is.
 

Uncanny Valley

ONE MORE GOD REJECTED
True & Honest Fan
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Michael Shur is a cancer.

View attachment 945798
(this is not a Dreamworks face meme)

Michael Shur is the creator of Parks and Recreation, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and The Good Place. All of his shows tend to follow the same pattern: funny at the beginning, but quickly devolving into heartfelt and uplifting non-comedies. With each subsequent show, the devolution becomes more rapid. Parks and Rec took three seasons, B99 two seasons and The Good Place half a season. Abby's drops the pretense and is a turgent hug box for unlikable grotesques from the very beginning.

The Premise
"Set in San Diego, the series takes place at the home of Abby, a bisexual Latina ex-Marine sergeant, who turned her backyard into an unlicensed bar complete with her own set of rules, which the eclectic set of regulars have to follow."

So its basically Cheers, except not funny and with no likable characters.

What Was Wrong With It?
I alluded to it earlier, but Abby's was a show that tried to be uplifting and emotional way too quickly. In every episode, the "comedy" would come to a screeching halt while one character or another would dump all their emotional baggage on the audience. Not a fan of Ron Funches? Well, too fucking bad, here's 7 minutes of him crying about how hard life is for a fat man. Imagine P&R doing an episode about Jerry's home life in the first season. That's how out-of-place these heart touching confessions felt watching Abby's. If you want to do heartfelt, you need to first give the audience a reason to give a shit about the character and his problems. Otherwise, its just a burden on the audience.

Now, admittedly, Cheers did have its dramatic moments in the early years. Probably one of the more well-known ones are this conversation between Coach and his daughter.


The most brilliant thing about this scene is not that Coach says all the right things. In fact, he says all the wrong things and, in doing so, unwittingly forces his daughter to see herself through his eyes. His misunderstanding--their breakdown in communication--is what ultimately solves her problem. In the Abby's version of this, the Coach would acknowledge his daughter's feelings, but persuade her to change her mind with some pablum about inner strength.


The Marketing
There were two main marketing thrusts for Abby's: 1) Mike Shur is producing, and 2) its filmed outdoors in front of a live studio audience. When your second biggest selling point is that you forced your studio audience to sit outside in the California sun for 3+ hours, you know the network had no faith in the show. Why does this matter? Well, after the show was cancelled, its star, Natalie Morales had a massive meltdown about NBC betraying 'diversity.'




A lot of that is just the ramblings of a entitled Hollywood d-lister, but let me highlight this one paragraph:

“If I’m being honest, it’s bullshit to tout all of these firsts and all this inclusion and all this diversity and then not market the show whatsoever,” she says. She was told it was the first show in the history of NBC that got zero outdoor marketing. “So that tells you something,” she adds. “Not that I’m not thankful for the people that put it on the air. I just feel like, if you’re going to say that you’re about diversity, then actually walk the walk.”

"NBC doesn't support diversity because they didn't put up a billboard for my shitty little show, waaaaaaaaaaaahhhh."

Fuck Abby's and fuck that dumb bitch Natalie Morales.


(I would have put Abby's clips in this post, but the guy who had them on youtube privated all of his videos last night)
I'd put post-SJW whinefest B99 here too.
 
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werewolf rape erotica

SHOVE IT UP YOUR UGLY ASS!
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I caught a snippet of The Wendy Williams Show while I was at work in the break room.
Wendy Williams is frequently featured on Crazy Days and Nights.

Michael Shur is the creator of Parks and Recreation, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and The Good Place.
It has always been a complete mystery to me how the person behind the absolutely brilliant Ken Tremendous character on Fire Joe Morgan could turn around and create such completely unfunny shows like those listed above.
 
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CherryBlossomTree

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The nutshack & Ren and Stimpy adult party cartoon. I hate them both, but for different reasons. everything in the nutshack from the animation to the voice acting gives me a god damn headache. While in adult party cartoon, its just unfunny gross out humor and the animation just makes me uncomfortable with how detailed they made the gore. Plus it had to ruin the reputation of one of my favorite nicktoons along with it. :/

As for live action stuff, Heil Honey I'm Home I guess. It doesn't offend me or anything like that, it's just some shitty sitcom about Hitler with bad jokes in it. Honestly, I feel like this one could of worked if the team behind it knew how to pull of the execution
 
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