TIL: post things you learned today. -

AprilRains

Drowning Pumpkin
True & Honest Fan
The twenty-fifth law of the Code of Hammurabi reads, in a reasonably recent translation: "If fire break out in a house, and some one who comes to put it out cast his eye upon the property of the owner of the house, and take the property of the master of the house, he shall be thrown into that self-same fire."
 

AprilRains

Drowning Pumpkin
True & Honest Fan
I grew up on a ranch which was tended by my father, his brother, and their respective families. We were fairly clannish and mostly didn't interact with the community. As I went to public school, I became aware of terms we used that my classmates didn't: "stirk" for a yearling, "coody" for a donkey, "Seesta here!" meant "Look here!", "fit" was a past tense of "fight", and so on.

I grew curious about this later in life, and discovered after some effort (pre-Internet) that these usages were common in northern England, and specifically in the county of Cumberland. I had been inclined to dismiss rumors that we had been border Scots, but apparently that is what we were.
 

kinglordsupreme19

Diurnal Dominance Dispenser
Not so much something I learned, but an articulation of something I kinda knew already.

(from /lit/)
milennial writers.png
 

Count groudon

Concentration camp counselor
True & Honest Fan
Always used to wonder why bulls and cows always had ringsthrough their noses in old cartoons. Always thought it was like a status thing, but turns out old cattlemen used to tie ropes around the rings to make them easier to lead. Kind of a cruel practice in hindsight, but some still use non-piercing rings to help wean calfs from their mothers and to prevent cows from try to nurse other calfs.
 

Lurkette

Professional Depression
True & Honest Fan
Arbys intellectual property is held by Arbys IP Holder, LLC

Arbys intellectual property is held by Arbys IP Holder, LLC

Arbys intellectual property is held by Arbys IP Holder, LLC
 
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