Transhumanism - Debate on Safety, Feasibility, and Ethics - Nanomachines, son!

Synthetic Smug

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It's the Rapture for Reddit-tier coomers and consoomers, though the technology is fascinating.

EDIT: I think it's important to note that even if people are actively irreligious, it's not the proof against magical thinking and religious sentiment they may think it is.
 
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Maurice Caine

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Do you think this will be the final solution for trannies? If the whole 'print your whole body out' spiel works out will it get cheap enough so those activists can finally realize their dreaming of being a true and honest woman? Because I'm fucking tired of those ugly faggots ruining everything because of their psychosis.
 

The Gangster Computer

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As unlikely as it would be, what if being able to freely alter yourself genetically were a possibility instead of doing so via amputation and artificial replacements. Like being able to freely alter your appearance, height, etc biologically, would that also count as a form of transhumanism? And do you all think it would be a better alternative to amputation and robotics-focused transhumanism?

I recall once reading a scifi story in one of those old Tales of Science collections that tackled the potential risks and new forms of crimes that would arise in a society where cosmetic alterations and gene splicing are as common as getting a haircut, which mirrored the stories of the dangers of technological transhumanism pretty well. From criminals physically stealing identities to people enhancing themselves with inhuman strength and endurance, or some doing it for pure cosmetic "fashion".

I can't recall the name of story, so the only example I can immediately give is an episode from Batman Beyond that tackled a future where humans splicing themselves with animal DNA has become common place and as controversial as extreme piercings and given rise to new forms of crime and supremacy ideologies.
I personally see this as the fall of man and the rise of the furfags.
 

SCSI

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Thanks for spinning up this thread and pinging me, Todger. I love this subject and any chance to sperg on it.

Warning to readers -- Post may be bloggy or PL-ey, seems unavoidable given how philosophical and ultimately personal this topic is, so MOUSEWHEEL ACTIVATE if you don't care. This is Deep Thunks and I'm nearing the end of my absinthe for the night, so I ain't spoilering shit, nibba. On a totally-unrelated note, I make no warranties or promises with regards to how coherent this will be. Absinthe is good. Go drink some.

(Vieux Carre or Kubler white are my top recommendations. Mix 1 part absinthe to 3-5 parts chilled water, depending on how strong you want the herbal bitterness and the alcohol. Yes, it's supposed to change color/get cloudy, that's called the "louche". Do not sugar either of those brands, especially the white Kubler, they don't need it and you will destroy the flavor.)

Note Bene -- These positions are purely my own, and how I view what is best/most compatible for me. I have zero interest in arguing what anyone else should do -- I fucking hate gurus. If your preferences are polar opposite to mine and you'd rather go Amish, that's cool so long as you're fine with letting me go cyborg.

Personally, my opinion is this. We are moving too fast. Way, way too fast. Legislators and ethicists have not caught up yet. Most regulators do not even understand the technology behind transhumanism and what it actually does, or what the consequences for society may be. Why, some applications of offensive nanoparticle tech could be used to literally capture our regulators by directly manipulating their opinion of the technology to be positive, allowing the shadowy overclass to get away with murder, both figuratively and literally.

Big topic, and one that's dear to me for the <REDACTED> decades of my life. To give a hint as to how much so, I was the kid in the 80s and 90s who literally pulled out and saved advertisements and articles for anything that took even the tiniest step towards cybernetics or home VR. Settled on opening with a response to this comment as a jumping-off point because fuck it, got to start somewhere.

I largely take the opposite position. I want to go faster. Fuck the hazards. All amazing projects have equally awe-inspiring risks; creation is a dance on the edge of ruin.

Transhuman enhancement, especially cognitive, while it could (and will) be used as a weapon against the non-elite, is *also* an equalizing force against them. "God made men, but Sam Colt made them equal" needs an update -- compute is power.

This kind of an issue is, on a less-scifi level, why shit like California's upcoming draconian restrictions on compute equipment power consumption sends me into a white-hot rage -- for decades, this level of power has been strictly the plaything of large institutions, governments, and those with infinite budgets. Fuck off and leave me and my kilowatt-devouring workstation alone, you don't get to hog all the cool gear and serious project contributions any more.

I agree manipulation of regulators is a serious issue, which is one reason why I want to slam the gas to the floor -- regulators move slow, and if the tech can become widespread before they try to ban it, it becomes a fait accompli and they can't succeed. Think the Internet in general, or more historically, the printing press or literacy itself. Slaveowners and tyrants are always the ones who want to control information and technology. If they have AI/cybernetic enhancements, so do we, and the playing field is leveled/kept from getting more unlevel.

But I want to go fast for more than just an opportunity to keep up in the arms race.

I want to go fast because it's fucking cool.

I love daring achievements and amazing inventions. I'm not Christian, but I've long thought that the much-debated imago dei man was created in was the faculty of creation/imagination itself. Creation and invention make life have meaning beyond base animality. Opening up the possibility to rebuild the body to spec, experience created worlds with as much detail and intensity as the designer can manage, or use machines/computers as naturally as our own limbs opens up so many opportunities for expression, creation, and discovery.

I think those possibilities are worth the downsides, especially as history's shown us evil is mundane. It doesn't need sci-fi tech to oppress or make miserable. Shitty elites will try to exploit you even if all they have it their own words or a heavy stick to hit you with. Might as well reach for the stars while we maintain the constant struggle to keep assholes from completely shitting up the world.

And if in the end we create SkyNET and get obliterated... at least we went out with one hell of a bang. A lot more interesting than "and then humanity puttered along for a billion years as subsistence farmers until the sun burned out, the end."

TL;DR -- "I will not reason and compare, my business is to create." -- William Blake, Jerusalem: The Emanation of the Giant Albion, plate 10

Edit -- Grammar cleanup.
 
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A-Stump

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Many cybernetics would, for all intents and purposes, be tied to one of our most neglected areas of study: Human neuroscience. I'm guessing China has no such quandaries but experiments done on living human brains most places have been frowned upon and it's not exactly something you'd offer up willingly unless you had nothing to lose. Scientists have grown human brains and could theoretically run them through batteries of tests which could serve as valuable research but again there's the morality issue of creating something which could maybe suffer. I don't know the legality of it but it seems on shaky ground.

Anyways until we have a better grasp on the brain it's unlikely we'll be able to have any of the super sci-fi stuff. Right now it's like trying to decide how you'll decorate your skyscraper apartment before the foundation has even been set.
 

Drain Todger

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@SCSI

That was exactly the attitude that I used to have. Now, I'm not so sure. The potential for misuse of the tech is enormous if we don't have a regulatory framework to ensure that it won't be used to strip people of our rights and our personal autonomy in an organized manner, which is a very real risk.

While analyzing some things pertaining to the pandemic, I stumbled across some stuff that would turn people's hair white if they understood the implications.





James Giordano is not some random kook. These are his credentials:


James Giordano, PhD, MPhil, is Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Biochemistry, Chief of the Neuroethics Studies Program, leads the Sub-program in Military Medical Ethics of the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics; is Special Advisor to the Brain Bank, and is Co-director of the O'Neill-Pellegrino Program in Brain Science and Global Health Law and Policy at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA. He is also Distinguished Visiting Professor of Brain Science, Health Promotions, and Ethics at the Coburg University of Applied Sciences, Coburg, Germany, and was formerly 2011-2012 JW Fulbright Foundation Visiting Professor of Neurosciences and Neuroethics at the Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.

Dr. Giordano is currently Fellow of the Project on Biosecurity, Technology, and Ethics at the US Naval War College, Newport, RI; chairs the Neuroethics Program of the IEEE Brain Initiative; is Senior Science Advisory Fellow of the Strategic Multilayer Assessment Branch of the Joint Staff of the Pentagon, serves as an appointed member of the Neuroethics, Legal and Social Issues (NELSI) Advisory Panel of the Defense Advanced Research Projects’ Agency (DARPA), and is consulting bioethicist to the Department of Defense Medical Ethics Center (DMEC). He previously served an appointed member of United States Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Council on Human Research Protections (SACHRP), and as Task Leader of the Project on Dual-Use Neurotechnologies of the European Union Human Brain Project.

The author of over 300 publications, 7 books, and 20 government whitepapers on neurotechnology, biosecurity, and ethics, he is Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine; and Associate Editor of the Cambridge Quarterly of Health Care Ethics. His ongoing research addresses the neurobiological bases of neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders; and neuroethical issues arising in and from the development, use and misuse of neuroscientific techniques and neurotechnologies in medicine, public life, global health, and military applications. In recognition of his work, he was elected to membership in the European Academy of Science and Arts, and named as an Overseas Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine (UK).


A former Fulbright Professor of Neuroscience and Neuroethics at the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Jim currently is Distinguished Visiting Professor of Brain Science, Health Promotions, and Ethics at the Coburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany, and was awarded the University Gold Medal for Distinguished Achievement and Service in December 2018. The author of seven books in print (with two more forthcoming), fifteen governmental whitepapers, and more than 290 published articles, much of his work has focused upon the use and misuse of brain science in warfare, intelligence and global security operations. He is now Senior Fellow for Biowarfare and Biosecurity of the Donovan Group of US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), and through 2016 was Senior Science Advisory Fellow to the Joint Staff of the Pentagon. Jim has served as an appointed member of the Neuroethics, Legal and Social Issues Advisory Panel of the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) and was Senior Research Fellow and Task Leader of the EU-Human Brain Project’s Sub-Project on Dual-Use Brain Science.

Admitting that work is almost always on his mind in one way or another, he notes that piloting airplanes – a skill that he honed while flying for the US Navy and Marine Corps – is the one hobby that demands his concentration solely on the task at hand. But the logistics of work, international travel, and the time needed to maintain both his airplane (a restored 1948 L-17B warplane) and his piloting skills forced him to sell his plane. “The precision skills get rusty pretty fast, although the basics never really go away.” He laments: “But neither does the absolute joy of flying a plane; I miss it almost every day.”

His CV reads like a comic book character. He's a PhD in neuroscience, had prior service in both the US Navy and US Marine Corps as a pilot, and he's involved in numerous neuroethics think tanks. If this guy is trying to warn people that NeuroS/T can be used to manipulate fundamental aspects of people's character, we should stand up and take notice.
 

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Kabuki Actor

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Some euphorics say that "good people don't sin, Christians compulsively sin and ask for forgiveness". Transhumanists are the egoist version of that, people who cope with their self destruction by saying that not-god will save them from their alcoholism and obesity. Transhumanists think it's funny to say that your body is a temple, they're right, it's more like a sinking ship with no available replacement, but, the body-temple school is going to be the one that reaps the rewards of theoretical nerd rapture.
DMvcFbEXkAIk7FW

To them, everyone is terminally ill, and more than that, it's a terminal illness that could be fixed in the foreseeable future as long as you make measures to extend your life. But they're content with continuing the unhealthy habits that might condemn them to certain and irreversible oblivion. They don't fear oblivion enough to save their lives, they're only intellectually concerned with mortality. I understand why they're like that though, might as well follow a regular religion if you're going to donate to the temple and live austerely for future rewards. And it shows what they'll be like when the technology hits, taking invasive and overpriced treatments for the consequences of their reckless lives. You saw a preview of the transhumanist method when the Cathedral insisted that experimental gene therapists are the only qualified treatment for Wu Flu. Vitamins and exercise will be branded as retrograde snake oil, the only medically approved treatment will be another overpriced invasive implant to replace your endocrine system and failing organs.
mrfrcheader.jpg

They will look at their daughters, and they will only see the face of Hello Kitty, a robotic sleeve that was recommended by doctors for treating her dehydration headache, her original body lying in a youth pill factory somewhere.
 

Maurice Caine

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Some euphorics say that "good people don't sin, Christians compulsively sin and ask for forgiveness". Transhumanists are the egoist version of that, people who cope with their self destruction by saying that not-god will save them from their alcoholism and obesity. Transhumanists think it's funny to say that your body is a temple, they're right, it's more like a sinking ship with no available replacement, but, the body-temple school is going to be the one that reaps the rewards of theoretical nerd rapture.
I dig the potential prospects, hell you could sit with the worst posture all your life and some sort of artificial spine would just fix your back like nothing ever happened. That's just an example, health would benefit greatly from this. There are always downsides and you always never get what you exactly want out of things, though. So I figure it's your responsibility to weigh that.
 

Drain Todger

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BCI tech is certainly advancing very, very rapidly.


They were able to do stuff similar to this with Utah Arrays ages ago, but those were rigid and awkward and had a limited number of channels (around 100 or so). The current version of the Neuralink has something like 1024 channels. That's still nowhere near enough to do something as advanced as reading from (and writing to) large numbers of neurons. Indeed, many are skeptical about whether or not this approach will ever pan out:


A true neural lace will likely be some type of wireless device that can be implanted in the brain in a minimally-invasive manner, without requiring a craniotomy (no cutting away part of the skull). What are DARPA up to with the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology program? Let's see.


The N3 teams are pursuing a range of approaches that use optics, acoustics, and electromagnetics to record neural activity and/or send signals back to the brain at high speed and resolution. The research is split between two tracks. Teams are pursuing either completely noninvasive interfaces that are entirely external to the body or minutely invasive interface systems that include nanotransducers that can be temporarily and nonsurgically delivered to the brain to improve signal resolution.

  • The Battelle team, under principal investigator Dr. Gaurav Sharma, aims to develop a minutely invasive interface system that pairs an external transceiver with electromagnetic nanotransducers that are nonsurgically delivered to neurons of interest. The nanotransducers would convert electrical signals from the neurons into magnetic signals that can be recorded and processed by the external transceiver, and vice versa, to enable bidirectional communication.
  • The Carnegie Mellon University team, under principal investigator Dr. Pulkit Grover, aims to develop a completely noninvasive device that uses an acousto-optical approach to record from the brain and interfering electrical fields to write to specific neurons. The team will use ultrasound waves to guide light into and out of the brain to detect neural activity. The team’s write approach exploits the non-linear response of neurons to electric fields to enable localized stimulation of specific cell types.
  • The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory team, under principal investigator Dr. David Blodgett, aims to develop a completely noninvasive, coherent optical system for recording from the brain. The system will directly measure optical path-length changes in neural tissue that correlate with neural activity.
  • The PARC team, under principal investigator Dr. Krishnan Thyagarajan, aims to develop a completely noninvasive acousto-magnetic device for writing to the brain. Their approach pairs ultrasound waves with magnetic fields to generate localized electric currents for neuromodulation. The hybrid approach offers the potential for localized neuromodulation deeper in the brain.
  • The Rice University team, under principal investigator Dr. Jacob Robinson, aims to develop a minutely invasive, bidirectional system for recording from and writing to the brain. For the recording function, the interface will use diffuse optical tomography to infer neural activity by measuring light scattering in neural tissue. To enable the write function, the team will use a magneto-genetic approach to make neurons sensitive to magnetic fields.
  • The Teledyne team, under principal investigator Dr. Patrick Connolly, aims to develop a completely noninvasive, integrated device that uses micro optically pumped magnetometers to detect small, localized magnetic fields that correlate with neural activity. The team will use focused ultrasound for writing to neurons.
Apparently, the most successful of these is the Battelle team. Indeed, they got a $20 million grant to keep working on their BrainSTORMs project.



Based on its description, Battelle's system presumably uses electromagnetic resonance. How do they seek to accomplish this? By implanting millions or even billions of 20-nanometer (smaller than a virus) core-and-shell doped nanoparticles into brain cells, and then interacting with them using a helmet that generates precisely localized electromagnetic fields. Basically, it turns the brain into a Wacom pen.


DARPA-Brain-3-2.png


DARPA-Brain-5-678x509.png

How far along is this technology? Just ask the Rice University team.

They've injected similar nanoparticles into the brains of fruit flies and successfully stimulated their brains with them using electromagnetic fields.

 

cybertoaster

Chairman of the mammary regulation committee
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TLDR: OP wants to be a nerd space mushroom
med_art_for_OA_9.jpg


We can barely get a computer or phone that wont sent every single thing you do to glownigger and megacorp servers but you want to buy a botnet brain implant from those people?

You think your banking information is what they want? with this shit they could make you comply to whatever they demand and you wouldnt even feel the need to rebel, you wouldnt object because they can make you think thats what you actually want, get it?

Anyway, just give me a matrix full of big titty anime (and real) bitches with no STDs.
 

Nom Carver

Pandemic did it better.
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Computers barely function as it is. I always run into the weirdest, most bizarre errors in pretty much whatever I do. I'm not putting any tech in my squishy, soft, unimaginably complex and important brain.

I don't look forwards to this kind of stuff at all. I can only see it spelling mass disaster ahead. When anything but yourself has any direct connection to your brain, your freedom is already gone. I am wholly and totally glad I'll likely be dead before stuff gets really bad.


Edit: I'm reminded of the concept of immortality and living forever, and I wanted to touch on it.

It's fucking hilarious. Human beings are literally made to die. It's not that depressing, it's just a simple fact. It is intrinsic to human beings that death is something we go through. Even if you can extend your life to live forever, I have little doubt that almost everyone would get to the point within maybe, 150 - 200 years of life that they want to die. You can already see this in much of the elderly. Many of them have come accepting of death and are ready to move on. It's why I regard wanting to live forever as really just a childish concept.

I do not fear death. I welcome it, when it comes. But that does not mean I want it. I will happily fight tooth and nail to protect my life, but if I die, I die. And that's okay. Everything in its time. And my own curiosity to see what exists after death, a question that is impossible to find the answer to in life, is one of the main things that drives my non fear of death.
 
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Save the Loli

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Computers barely function as it is. I always run into the weirdest, most bizarre errors in pretty much whatever I do. I'm not putting any tech in my squishy, soft, unimaginably complex and important brain.

I don't look forwards to this kind of stuff at all. I can only see it spelling mass disaster ahead. When anything but yourself has any direct connection to your brain, your freedom is already gone. I am wholly and totally glad I'll likely be dead before stuff gets really bad.
This is very true and why you'd have to be an idiot to voluntarily accept a brain-computer interface even if it's somehow "totally safe". There's zero reason someone couldn't hack your brain and fuck with your senses (or worse, make you a zombie) the same way people hack cars. Okay sure, security and encryption and all that shit, but at that point you're just scaling up the level of computer needed to hack your brain and that opens the can of worms where either governments are cracking down on what sort of computers people can own OR you're going to allow some guy half a world away to hack your brain. And they'd STILL probably have people hacking brains because organized crime and terrorists don't fuck around and have plenty of expensive, advanced technology.

All of these "awesome, high-tech computers" and new technology is full of glitches and random bullshit, yet for some reason we're forced to go along with it for "convenience". Like the "smart homes" where the power company can fuck with the thermostat to save energy, the aforementioned hacking cars, the fact an oil pipeline is connected to the internet, all that shit. Look what they say the benefit of a BCI is, it's simple shit like being able to send text messages from your brain or turn the lights on by thinking about it. If you aren't literally mentally damaged (where it would be great for helping people, I admit) there's no reason to get one.

And you know this shit will be made mandatory. Watch for "COVID-39" or the next scamdemic when this tech will be more mature and they'll probably have the "vaccines" (more gene therapy) have nanoparticles that interact with your BCI to confirm you've been vaxxed, and without a BCI you'll be banned from society.
Edit: I'm reminded of the concept of immortality and living forever, and I wanted to touch on it.

It's fucking hilarious. Human beings are literally made to die. It's not that depressing, it's just a simple fact. It is intrinsic to human beings that death is something we go through. Even if you can extend your life to live forever, I have little doubt that almost everyone would get to the point within maybe, 150 - 200 years of life that they want to die. You can already see this in much of the elderly. Many of them have come accepting of death and are ready to move on. It's why I regard wanting to live forever as really just a childish concept.

I do not fear death. I welcome it, when it comes. But that does not mean I want it. I will happily fight tooth and nail to protect my life, but if I die, I die. And that's okay. Everything in its time. And my own curiosity to see what exists after death, a question that is impossible to find the answer to in life, is one of the main things that drives my non fear of death.
I strongly disagree. There's really not enough time in the world to do everything you might want to do, and if you had all that time in the world you'd end up finding new things to do that you never knew existed. The reason most elderly people want to die is because everyone they knew is dead/dying and they know from the miserable state their body is in that they'd be next. The drugs we feed to elderly people to keep them alive often restrict their diet or have unpleasant side effects. Assuming we made a way for effective immortality that, say, just made you feel like shit for a day and then you felt like you were 30 years old again and looked 40-50, most elderly people would be happier or at the very least the next generation of elderly people would be.
 

Male Idiot

Das rite!
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Only if we can get Space Marines and embrace the glory of the Machine, with red robe, radiation gun and mecha tentacles.
Greatly increased lifespan and combat ability to show the ayy-lmaos whose boss.

Not interested in Cyberpuuuunk mega cawk 9000 20 inches stainless steel.
 

Drain Todger

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This is very true and why you'd have to be an idiot to voluntarily accept a brain-computer interface even if it's somehow "totally safe". There's zero reason someone couldn't hack your brain and fuck with your senses (or worse, make you a zombie) the same way people hack cars. Okay sure, security and encryption and all that shit, but at that point you're just scaling up the level of computer needed to hack your brain and that opens the can of worms where either governments are cracking down on what sort of computers people can own OR you're going to allow some guy half a world away to hack your brain. And they'd STILL probably have people hacking brains because organized crime and terrorists don't fuck around and have plenty of expensive, advanced technology.

All of these "awesome, high-tech computers" and new technology is full of glitches and random bullshit, yet for some reason we're forced to go along with it for "convenience". Like the "smart homes" where the power company can fuck with the thermostat to save energy, the aforementioned hacking cars, the fact an oil pipeline is connected to the internet, all that shit. Look what they say the benefit of a BCI is, it's simple shit like being able to send text messages from your brain or turn the lights on by thinking about it. If you aren't literally mentally damaged (where it would be great for helping people, I admit) there's no reason to get one.

And you know this shit will be made mandatory. Watch for "COVID-39" or the next scamdemic when this tech will be more mature and they'll probably have the "vaccines" (more gene therapy) have nanoparticles that interact with your BCI to confirm you've been vaxxed, and without a BCI you'll be banned from society.
This was posted on a channel that I'm a part of. Kind of a compilation of some of the most stunning statements from James Giordano:



BCIs have advantages and disadvantages.
  • Pros:
    • Heal previously unfixable connectivity and endocrine issues; schizophrenia, autism, depression, paralysis, neuropathy and the like. Also, one would be able to cure neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, dementia, and Parkinson's by using a slaved exocortex to make up for the lost capacity.
    • Enable high throughput communication with prosthetic limbs, powered exoskeletons, et cetera, as well as full touch feedback from them.
    • Sense-jacking (the ability to have hyper-realistic augmented-reality or virtual-reality experiences piped directly into the brain, overriding the body's own senses).
    • Metaverse. As a corollary to the above, if someone has a BCI capable of sense-jacking, they could use it not only for entertainment, but also for communication and for business. This makes commuting and all services along one's commute utterly obsolete. Now, your office can literally be a castle floating on a cloud in a next-gen version of Second Life, and all you have to do to get there is sit lotus position on your bed and close your eyes. No risk of dying in a traffic accident. No paying for fuel. Nothing. This would utterly revolutionize e-commerce.
  • Cons:
    • Security issues. Anything electronic can be hacked, and if that's in your brain, your brain data could be stolen or altered surreptitiously.
    • Privacy issues. Once people have BCIs, the authorities will be tempted to use them for pre-crime type shit, detecting and categorizing "disallowed thoughts", et cetera.
    • Autonomy issues. Advanced BCIs could be used to manipulate people's behavior and override their free will, or to manipulate their perception of reality, or both.
    • Brain bot-netting. BCIs could be used to steal people's brain "clock cycles", essentially turning the entire network of BCI-equipped humans into a giant distributed supercomputer. Such a computer would have incredible power, and may even be able to host substrate-independent minds. For example, the Elites may try and distribute their minds over a BCI network, thus avoiding death, without the pesky engineering problem of having to build actual replacement brains for themselves. Gee, what an amazing incentive for forcing BCIs on everyone, eh?
 

Grub Nub

Cult of Birb
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This is something that I love reading and thinking about but never get to talk about. Hence I will likely forever be a retard on this topic.
It's obvious that one thread is not enough to efficiently discuss everything OP brings up. But it's a well structured effort. I'll try to say something "productive." And I will spoiler my main points.

Nanotech/nanomachines have MASSIVE implications for medicine, e.g. in age-related disease. I think some people have an idea that nanotech/nanomachines in humans will be actual tiny robots swimming around in your blood breaking down amaloid plaque/LDL/whatever in best case or malfunctioning and breaking down your muscle/neurons/whatever in worst case. In reality, nanotech (as it's currently developing) will be highly specific molecules that can only do one function. Think of proteins (including enzymes). DNA can be modified to produce proteins that prevent/treat certain diseases (this links back to "synthetic biology"/GMO, as stated by OP) but that's not coming anytime soon. And notice I am NOT mentioning synthetic cells. That's a whole other topic.
Exoskeletons have massive implications to industry and military. I could go on about this in the context of OP but "mech suits" aren't my only interest. Hapic suits are another intruige. They are wearable tech that is being used a lot for VR gaming now. However, a few years ago, these were being developed to help certain sorts of deaf people perceive sound. The intent makes sense; sound is vibration and you are deferring/redirecing that vibration to different parts of the body to help people "hear." This sort of suit was also being tested to help train pilots in understanding the mechanical status of their aircraft without visual stimuli. In this context, exoskeletons can be used to more thoroughly and non-invasively integrate tech into our body schema. Anyone who has kept up on this, please let me know.

The above two fields, I strongly endorse and think should be researched and developed as quick as possible. But of course that is not all of the tech/engineering OP mentioned. I have nothing else to say about the other topics rn. But I have two smaller points to make:

People have already brought up immortality in this thread. I think human culture around death, in general, is terrible and results in a lot of extraneous suffering. I am occupationally obliged to deal with a lot of death. Thus I hope people can separate their emotions about death from the topic of "transhuman" tech. It will be a long time before we "end" death, if ever. I don't think this should be the focus of current discussion.

A lot of qualms with "transhuman" tech, I think, can be alleviated by education. Hence I think basic medicine and neuroscience should be introduced in high school/secondary school. There are a lot of technologies that can help us (our species and even our ecosystem(s)) develop and survive without enslaving us to Skynet.

TL;DR some of this stuff just needs to be in healthcare already.

[edited for grammar]
 
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