World Two Cancuck elections in April: Alberta on the 16th; PEI on the 23rd - Will the Dippers pull it off again? Will the Greens pull it off? Will the referendum pass?

What party would vote for?

  • New Democratic Party

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • United Conservative Party

    Votes: 9 47.4%
  • Alberta Party

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Liberal Party

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Freedom Conservative Party

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 26.3%

  • Total voters
    19
  • Poll closed .

Glad I couldn't help

Now with edge anime avatar
kiwifarms.net
Notley Calls Alberta Election, Kicking Off Race Against Kenney

Kevin Orland
BloombergMarch 19, 2019



Notley Calls Alberta Election, Kicking Off Race Against Kenney
(Bloomberg) -- Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said a provincial election will be held on April 16, kicking off a battle for control of one of the world’s top oil-producing jurisdictions.

Notley’s center-left New Democratic Party swept to power in 2015, ending more than four decades of conservative rule in Alberta. Since then, she has won mixed reviews from the province’s oil industry, facing criticism for implementing a carbon tax while winning applause for fighting to get new pipelines built.

United Conservative Party Leader Jason Kenney, whose organization is a combination of two parties that split the conservative vote in the last election, will challenge Notley. He is running on a platform of fighting harder for the energy industry, saying he’d kill the carbon tax, cut off oil shipments to provinces that balk at pipelines, boycott banks that shun fossil fuels and pressure the federal government to end billions in transfers to other regions if new pipelines don’t get built.

The energy industry is of utmost importance in Alberta and Canada. The province is currently producing about 3.6 million barrels of oil a day, more than any individual member of OPEC other than Saudi Arabia and Iraq, and the industry supports more than 500,000 jobs across the country. The energy industry accounts for about a tenth of Canada’s economy and a fifth of its exports.

Polls show Kenney’s party with a commanding lead, and it is widely expected to form the next Alberta government. However, Kenney’s approval ratings are lower than his party’s, while Notley is more popular than hers.

Since taking over in May 2015, Notley has grappled with a plunge in global oil prices that has hammered the province’s largest industry. Unemployment rose from 5.9 percent the month she took over to as high as 9.1 percent in November 2016. The rate was 7.3 percent in February

To contact the reporter on this story: Kevin Orland in Calgary at korland@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Simon Casey at scasey4@bloomberg.net, Carlos Caminada

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Here's the Wikipedia article, with the current poll standings:

700052


However, scandals seem to a brewing around the UCP and its leadship race, so this might change quickly.

Links:

EDIT: And now Prince Edward Island, aka New Potato Island aka Anne-of-Green-Gabbles-land, is going to the polls on April 23.

Prince Edward Island election called for April 23

Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan

Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan speaks during the wrap up news conference of the meeting of the Council of Atlantic Premiers in Charlottetown on Wednesday, January 23, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Brian McInnis

Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, March 26, 2019 3:11PM EDT
Last Updated Tuesday, March 26, 2019 7:40PM EDT

CHARLOTTETOWN -- P.E.I. Premier Wade MacLauchlan called an early election Tuesday night, announcing an April 23 vote that polls suggest could produce Canada's first Green Party government.
"This is Prince Edward Island's time," MacLauchlan told a nomination meeting for a local candidate at a Charlottetown hotel. "We are experiencing a sense of opportunity like never before in our long and distinguished history."
The Liberal government didn't have to take voters to the polls until Oct. 7 under the province's fixed-date election provisions, but there was an apparent desire to avoid overlap with the federal election this fall.

"It's been four years. We had a mandate and fulfilled it," MacLauchlan told reporters when asked about the early call. "This is an opportunity to ask Islanders for their confidence to build on that record."
Despite a booming economy, polls suggest the Liberal party is likely facing a rough ride, with the Greens seen as a legitimate contender for power.
In his speech, MacLauchlan called the Progressive Conservatives a party of chaos and opposition -- saying they've had five leaders in four years -- and suggested the Greens would be too risky.
"The Green Party is untested, and the future of our province is too important to risk on uncertain expensive social experiments, led by a career politician," he said.
Green Leader Peter Bevan-Baker, a dentist, became the first party member elected to the legislature in 2015, and the Greens snagged a second seat in a 2017 byelection.
A Corporate Research Associates poll released this month suggests the Greens had a healthy lead, followed by the Progressive Conservatives, who picked a new leader, Dennis King, in February.
The Liberals were in third place, the poll suggests.
The Liberals have been in power since 2007, and there are signs MacLauchlan -- a longtime academic who began his political career in 2015 as premier -- is personally unpopular.
"It's about people. It's about you -- and it's about time that the government of the people of P.E.I. understand, respect and live by that message," the PC party said in a tweet as MacLauchlan was making his election call.
The Greens, meanwhile, posted a clip Tuesday night of Bevan-Baker playing "First Call" on his trumpet.
"What a wonderful way to begin the writ period -- with a blast from Peter's trumpet," the party said on Facebook.
In his speech, MacLauchlan touted advancements made by his government on housing, lower taxes and reducing child poverty by more than half.
"Prince Edward Island is working," he told the enthusiastic partisan crowd. "There are now more opportunities for Islanders to get ahead and thrive."
The standings at dissolution in the Island legislature were 16 Liberals, eight Tories, two Green and one independent member.
The Island has only ever been governed by the Liberals or Tories. The last time a minority government was elected in P.E.I. was 1890.
MacLauchlan said Tuesday night that he notified the other party leaders earlier in the day.
He is scheduled to make his first campaign stop Wednesday morning in Charlottetown.
The election will also include a binding referendum on electoral reform -- asking voters if they wish to stay with the current first-past-the-post system or change to a mixed-member-proportional-representation model.
It won't be the first time P.E.I. voters have been asked to consider electoral reform.
In fact, they voted 52 per cent in favour of switching to mixed member proportional reform during a plebiscite in 2016, but MacLauchlan rejected the results because of a low turnout of about 36 per cent.
Links:

See this post for additional details.
 
Last edited:

GentlemanFaggot

I got in...
kiwifarms.net
Can someone explain to me how Tumblr-SJW-Commie-er-Than-Liberal won in Alberta, the Texas of Canada?
1. Provincial parties are not necessarily related to their Federal ones. The NDP in Alberta isn't as lefty as it would be in BC, for example, and the NDP government in BC is actually at odds with the one in Alberta. The NDP in Alberta supports the pipeline, for example.

2. The Conservative Party ended up losing votes to the breakaway Conservative Wildrose party, splitting the vote enough to get the NDP in.
 

Dracula's Spirit Animal

One time, I accidentally ate a bunch of nails
kiwifarms.net
1. Provincial parties are not necessarily related to their Federal ones. The NDP in Alberta isn't as lefty as it would be in BC, for example, and the NDP government in BC is actually at odds with the one in Alberta. The NDP in Alberta supports the pipeline, for example.

2. The Conservative Party ended up losing votes to the breakaway Conservative Wildrose party, splitting the vote enough to get the NDP in.
Won't happen this election, though, IMO. Conservatives will have a handy victory.
 

din365

kiwifarms.net
Can someone explain to me how Tumblr-SJW-Commie-er-Than-Liberal won in Alberta, the Texas of Canada?
Here's what happened:
The progressive element of the progressive conservatives took over and put somebody like Ed stalmach in, and the Klein era conservatives plit off and formed the wildrose party.

So, Stalmach made a mess of things and tried jacking the royalty rates, and essentially pissed off the oil and gas sector, then he ran off and Allison "the closet liberal" Redford got in and she and her red tories went of a spending spree with taxpayer money, and then she got ran off and jim prentice came into power. Here's the real screwup happened:

Danielle smith was the leader of the wildrose party, and she tried to lead a bunch of wildrose defectors over to he PC party and basically tried to kill it with that move. Well, brian jean was nominated as leader around the same time Rachel notley did as the NDP. old jim got really cocky and basically said he was going to raise taxes and spending if he got re-elected and called an early election and was sure he had it in the bag because nobody was going to elect the NDP and brain jean and the wildrose are essentially neutered after Danielle's backstab.

What actually end up happening? Vote splitting.
NDP cleaned up quite nicely in all of the cities, while wildrose became the official opposition off the rural areas, and coming up in third was a decimated PC party, because everybody was sick of the PC's, and the wildrose was hurting from smith's betrayal, so there was vote splitting on what remaining support there was. Rachel Notley ran a pretty moderate platform, so people proest voted for the NDP just to get the PC party out, and the NDP won a majority.
 

Broadwing

kiwifarms.net
Here's what happened:
The progressive element of the progressive conservatives took over and put somebody like Ed stalmach in, and the Klein era conservatives plit off and formed the wildrose party.

So, Stalmach made a mess of things and tried jacking the royalty rates, and essentially pissed off the oil and gas sector, then he ran off and Allison "the closet liberal" Redford got in and she and her red tories went of a spending spree with taxpayer money, and then she got ran off and jim prentice came into power. Here's the real screwup happened:

Danielle smith was the leader of the wildrose party, and she tried to lead a bunch of wildrose defectors over to he PC party and basically tried to kill it with that move. Well, brian jean was nominated as leader around the same time Rachel notley did as the NDP. old jim got really cocky and basically said he was going to raise taxes and spending if he got re-elected and called an early election and was sure he had it in the bag because nobody was going to elect the NDP and brain jean and the wildrose are essentially neutered after Danielle's backstab.

What actually end up happening? Vote splitting.
NDP cleaned up quite nicely in all of the cities, while wildrose became the official opposition off the rural areas, and coming up in third was a decimated PC party, because everybody was sick of the PC's, and the wildrose was hurting from smith's betrayal, so there was vote splitting on what remaining support there was. Rachel Notley ran a pretty moderate platform, so people proest voted for the NDP just to get the PC party out, and the NDP won a majority.
Geez, even more drama than I imagined when I first heard about the splitup years ago. Ah, 'third party' infighting.
 
Reactions: Apoth42

Lou Wrong

Butthurt about Buddyloids
kiwifarms.net
I should note that that "red tory" was the hand picked candidate of the teacher's unions and won what I believe was a very close multi-candidate primary, definitely not the choice of most PCs.
 

JosephTX

Tex. Penal Code § 9.42(b) (1994) Enthusiast
kiwifarms.net
Here's what happened:
The progressive element of the progressive conservatives took over and put somebody like Ed stalmach in, and the Klein era conservatives plit off and formed the wildrose party.

So, Stalmach made a mess of things and tried jacking the royalty rates, and essentially pissed off the oil and gas sector, then he ran off and Allison "the closet liberal" Redford got in and she and her red tories went of a spending spree with taxpayer money, and then she got ran off and jim prentice came into power. Here's the real screwup happened:

Danielle smith was the leader of the wildrose party, and she tried to lead a bunch of wildrose defectors over to he PC party and basically tried to kill it with that move. Well, brian jean was nominated as leader around the same time Rachel notley did as the NDP. old jim got really cocky and basically said he was going to raise taxes and spending if he got re-elected and called an early election and was sure he had it in the bag because nobody was going to elect the NDP and brain jean and the wildrose are essentially neutered after Danielle's backstab.

What actually end up happening? Vote splitting.
NDP cleaned up quite nicely in all of the cities, while wildrose became the official opposition off the rural areas, and coming up in third was a decimated PC party, because everybody was sick of the PC's, and the wildrose was hurting from smith's betrayal, so there was vote splitting on what remaining support there was. Rachel Notley ran a pretty moderate platform, so people proest voted for the NDP just to get the PC party out, and the NDP won a majority.
So basically that was such an autistic shitshow I can't even comprehend it
 
Reactions: Apoth42

din365

kiwifarms.net
So basically that was such an autistic shitshow I can't even comprehend it
Sure. go with that I guess. lol!

So basically PC's went progressive and pissed everybody off, wildrose was backstabbed, and the NDP ran a moderate platform and shit just lined up for them.
 
Reactions: Apoth42

Glad I couldn't help

Now with edge anime avatar
kiwifarms.net
Somewhat unrelated, but it doesn't fit in own thread I think. Prince Edward Island, Canada's smallest province in both area and population, has called a general election for April 23. This election could be notable for two reasons.

1. Polls indicate that the Green Party could win. This would be a first non-Tory, non-Liberal government in PEI ever and the first Green Party elected ever in Canada.

Prince Edward Island’s Green leader keen to make electoral history
By Kevin BissettThe Canadian Press
Wed., March 27, 2019

CHARLOTTETOWN—Prince Edward Island’s Green leader is contemplating making history — as the party’s first Canadian premier.
Islanders will go to the polls April 23 in a provincial election announced late Tuesday.
Prince Edward Island Green Leader Peter Bevan-Baker speaks during a televised debate in Summerside, P.E.I., on Monday, April 27, 2015. The Green leader says he's keen to make history as his party's first Canadian premier.

Prince Edward Island Green Leader Peter Bevan-Baker speaks during a televised debate in Summerside, P.E.I., on Monday, April 27, 2015. The Green leader says he's keen to make history as his party's first Canadian premier. (John Morris / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Recent polls have put the Greens out in front, and leader Peter Bevan-Baker believes his party can win a province that has only ever been governed by the Liberals or Tories.
“That possibility is there. Emotionally, politically and intellectually, I feel like I’m ready for that challenge, in a way that I wasn’t perhaps a year ago,” he said.
“This could be a truly historic moment not only in Canadian politics but for the future of our grandchildren.”
Bevan-Baker, 56, grew up in Scotland and immigrated to Canada in 1985, living in Newfoundland and then Ontario before settling in Prince Edward Island in 2003. He became a Canadian citizen in 1992.
A dentist by profession, he became his party’s first member of the P.E.I. legislature in 2015, following nine unsuccessful bids provincially and nationally for the party.
Since then, the Greens captured a second seat on the Island, and have been successful in getting members elected in other provinces, including three during last year’s New Brunswick election.
Bevan-Baker — who celebrated Tuesday’s election call by playing “First Call” on his trumpet at a nomination meeting — said he believes the time for the Green party has arrived.
“That sort of global movement away from conventional politics and unimaginative politicians, you see that expressed everywhere,” he said, citing recent elections in U.S. and Ontario as expressions of disgruntlement with conventional politics.

“I think what’s happening on P.E.I. is a local expression of that global phenomenon,” he said.
A Corporate Research Associates opinion poll released this month suggests the Greens had a healthy lead, followed by the Progressive Conservatives, who picked a new leader, Dennis King, in February.
The Liberals were in third place, the poll suggests.
Bevan-Baker said that both delights and surprises him. He said he has to accept the possibility of forming government.
“We’ve crafted a platform, that for perhaps the first time ever in Canada, a Green platform that might have to be implemented. You come at it with a different lens. You can’t be just aspirational and vague and uncosted. You have to have a detailed and costed platform, which we have,” he said.
But Liberal Premier Wade MacLauchlan has issued a caution about the Green party, saying the province’s future is too important to risk on uncertain expensive social experiments.
Bevan-Baker said he’s not sure what MacLauchlan is referring to, but believes it could be his suggestion that P.E.I. would be a good place for a pilot program for a universal basic income. He said that would be expensive at first, but pay off in the long run.
For his part, MacLauchlan used the first full day of the campaign to promise at least 3,500 new jobs over the next four years.
He said that’s in addition to the 5,000 full-time jobs added over the last four years.
“As I have said numerous times since I became premier, the creation of jobs and job choices for Islanders has to be the number one priority of government.”
“Our record in this field is strong. However, our present success is no reason to take the foot off the gas. Support for workers, for employers and for the next generations of workers needs to continue.”
The announcement includes a $4.5-million P.E.I. Worker Benefit to assist 12,600 low-income Islanders.
The Liberals would also spend $750 million on infrastructure programs to improve roads, bridges and schools, with a focus on job creation.
MacLauchlan said money would also be spent on a number of training programs, including new vocational facilities at Island high schools, and the small business tax rate would be reduced to 2.5 per cent by 2020.
Repeated calls requesting an interview with Progressive Conservative Leader Dennis King were not returned Wednesday.
Bevan-Baker said his party’s platform will be released in its entirety — likely next week.
While the parties have begun to pitch their issues, Don Desserud, a political scientist at the University of Prince Edward Island, said he believes the election will come down to personalities.
“It’s going to be an election based on the personalities of the leaders and people are going to vote according to whether they like or dislike the leaders of the parties,” Desserud said.
“The Progressive Conservatives are rising in the polls. The Liberals are falling in the polls and the Greens are staying quite steady high in the polls. I think it all has to do with the leaders and how well they’re liked,” he said.
The Island economy has been strong and the Conference Board of Canada recently said P.E.I. would lead the country in economic growth for the year ahead.
Desserud said voters blame the government when the economy is bad, but unfortunately for the Liberals, they don’t often credit the government with the economy is good.
“The Green party has been prudent in the way in which they have presented themselves and their policies and have appealed to the small ‘c’ conservatism of the Island. That’s worked really well for them, but I think right now they’re benefiting from the fact they are the alternative,” Desserud said.
708305


2. Concurrent with this election is a referendum on changing the electoral system. Currently, PEI uses Single plurality/First-past-the-post like almost everybody else in North America, the UK Parliament and India. The new referendum would change the system to Mixed Member Proportional, the same system (roughly) used in Germany, Scotland/Wales/London and New Zealand.

Brief explanation: Some proportion of seats is elected with FPTP in single districts. In addition of voting of the district member, there is second parallel vote on party lists. The proportions on this section vote is used to allocate the remainer of seats, "topping-up" the seat totals for parties which did not win any seats by disticts.

Note that is would be the third referendum on the electoral system: in 2005, a MMP proposal was decisively rejected and in 2016 a referendum held on voting system saw MMP win, but with a low percentage of votes cast, so the government did nothing.

Anyway, asking the same question as before: which party would you vote for? And how you vote in the referendum?
 

Zaryiu

kiwifarms.net
I voted United because my representative has always done her job well (she was Conservative brfore United was created) and where i voted it was very actitive )10 votes per hour before motpeople leave work) and the nearestsmall twon even more active (150 people per hour in the same time)
looks like people are taking this election really seriously )well after the traitors of the ndp fucked so many people over it makes sense)
 
Last edited:

Koby_Fish

The advice of the GALACTICALLY STUPID
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
1. Provincial parties are not necessarily related to their Federal ones. The NDP in Alberta isn't as lefty as it would be in BC, for example, and the NDP government in BC is actually at odds with the one in Alberta. The NDP in Alberta supports the pipeline, for example.

2. The Conservative Party ended up losing votes to the breakaway Conservative Wildrose party, splitting the vote enough to get the NDP in.
3. A bunch of NDP kids from British Columbia (and elsewhere, but mostly BC) are pulling a mass California and went to Alberta to get the jobs they couldn't get in BC, but then decide to stay and vote for the same garbage they always voted for in BC (which is overwhelmingly NDP).


New PEI poll from Mainstreet was just released. Greens 35.9%. Liberals 31,6%. PCs 27.5%. NDP 3.7%. This is more good news for the Greens as they are up just over 5% from the last Mainstreet poll conducted two months ago. Liberals are down 4% and PCs down 2%. NDP up 1%.
I guess this is what you get when you legalize Marijuana in PEI. Suddenly everybody loves the Green Party. Either that or the pollsters are smoking too much. Might be a TON of disgruntled NDP voters (or NDP leaning "independent" swing voters) though.
 

Army Burger

The Original Burger
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I guess this is what you get when you legalize Marijuana in PEI. Suddenly everybody loves the Green Party. Either that or the pollsters are smoking too much. Might be a TON of disgruntled NDP voters (or NDP leaning "independent" swing voters) though.
A fair amount of Green support has come from disappointed Liberal voters. The NDP's never really been in the position that the Greens currently find themselves in
 

Koby_Fish

The advice of the GALACTICALLY STUPID
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
New PEI poll from Mainstreet was just released. Greens 35.9%. Liberals 31,6%. PCs 27.5%. NDP 3.7%. This is more good news for the Greens as they are up just over 5% from the last Mainstreet poll conducted two months ago. Liberals are down 4% and PCs down 2%. NDP up 1%.
A fair amount of Green support has come from disappointed Liberal voters. The NDP's never really been in the position that the Greens currently find themselves in
Sounds about right, given how low the Liberals' numbers are in that poll (not to mention the NDP, but then again the NDP wasn't historically that popular throughout much of Atlantic Canada). But I'm guessing it's the habitual Liberal (either actual Liberals or Swing) voters that wouldn't have been able to bring themselves to vote Conservative instead - something something Stop Harper - and they're pissed enough at the NDP that their 'only' option is the Greens.

The other option is that the pollsters want to make the Greens look more viable than they actually are by sampling a hippie commune. Because reasons.
 
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